Kitless Fountain pens from South Africa

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Tiaan Burger

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2015
Messages
15
Location
Pretoria
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About seven years ago my best friend came to me and said he wants to make luxury pens. I told him I have no idea how to go about doing it.
About three years ago I made a number of oblique pen holders, but sales petered out and I lost interest.
In September I decided to have a go at making a ball point pen to take a Parker refill. The first looked good, except the cap did not stay put. I looked at pen kits, but decided against using them. My next attempt was a bit better, and then I started doing serious research. Much of what I now know came from this forum.
By the first week of October I had made a Japanese style threading tool to cut double start threads and I called my friend: "Remember when you asked if it was possible to make luxury pens? How would you like to go into business with me, making pens?"
I make the pens, he does the photography, graphic design, and is doing the urushi lacquering on some of our products.

We had to overcome some obstacles: There is no local supply of nibs, feeds or nib units, so I had to quickly learn how to make titanium nibs, how a feed works, and then how to make a feed that works. By the fifth attempt at making feeds I solved all the issues.
I can now make fine, medium and broad nibs in stub or flexible.
Materials is still a problem, so our first lot is made of an industrial polymer, and I am also working through my limited supply of acrylace, dymondwood and suitable hardwoods. I found a supplier of ebonite, the first lot should arrive in a week or two.

Thank you for looking, questions and comments welcome!

Tiaan Burger
 
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Tiaan Burger

Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2015
Messages
15
Location
Pretoria
Thank you all for the positive feedback!

Nice work. Way beyond what most even dream of. If you are ever inclined I'd like to see pictures of how you make the nibs and feeds.
I looked at this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xkOETcaVSk&index=28&list=PLiIZr8XyIsO51jZKNuhwIyzvjtT-XPhha&t=0s and basically followed along.
Two things I do not do though: I do not solder on a tip, and I don't forge the nib blank to thickness. I adapted some steps according to my available tools.
A large vocabulary of curses is also handy.
 

TonyL

Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2014
Messages
6,264
Location
Alpharetta, GA 30004
View attachment 181662 View attachment 181663 View attachment 181664

About seven years ago my best friend came to me and said he wants to make luxury pens. I told him I have no idea how to go about doing it.
About three years ago I made a number of oblique pen holders, but sales petered out and I lost interest.
In September I decided to have a go at making a ball point pen to take a Parker refill. The first looked good, except the cap did not stay put. I looked at pen kits, but decided against using them. My next attempt was a bit better, and then I started doing serious research. Much of what I now know came from this forum.
By the first week of October I had made a Japanese style threading tool to cut double start threads and I called my friend: "Remember when you asked if it was possible to make luxury pens? How would you like to go into business with me, making pens?"
I make the pens, he does the photography, graphic design, and is doing the urushi lacquering on some of our products.

We had to overcome some obstacles: There is no local supply of nibs, feeds or nib units, so I had to quickly learn how to make titanium nibs, how a feed works, and then how to make a feed that works. By the fifth attempt at making feeds I solved all the issues.
I can now make fine, medium and broad nibs in stub or flexible.
Materials is still a problem, so our first lot is made of an industrial polymer, and I am also working through my limited supply of acrylace, dymondwood and suitable hardwoods. I found a supplier of ebonite, the first lot should arrive in a week or two.

Thank you for looking, questions and comments welcome!

Tiaan Burger
Outstanding workmanship and beauty. Are these made on a wood lathe?
 

krAiki

Member
Joined
May 17, 2019
Messages
6
View attachment 181662 View attachment 181663 View attachment 181664

About seven years ago my best friend came to me and said he wants to make luxury pens. I told him I have no idea how to go about doing it.
About three years ago I made a number of oblique pen holders, but sales petered out and I lost interest.
In September I decided to have a go at making a ball point pen to take a Parker refill. The first looked good, except the cap did not stay put. I looked at pen kits, but decided against using them. My next attempt was a bit better, and then I started doing serious research. Much of what I now know came from this forum.
By the first week of October I had made a Japanese style threading tool to cut double start threads and I called my friend: "Remember when you asked if it was possible to make luxury pens? How would you like to go into business with me, making pens?"
I make the pens, he does the photography, graphic design, and is doing the urushi lacquering on some of our products.

We had to overcome some obstacles: There is no local supply of nibs, feeds or nib units, so I had to quickly learn how to make titanium nibs, how a feed works, and then how to make a feed that works. By the fifth attempt at making feeds I solved all the issues.
I can now make fine, medium and broad nibs in stub or flexible.
Materials is still a problem, so our first lot is made of an industrial polymer, and I am also working through my limited supply of acrylace, dymondwood and suitable hardwoods. I found a supplier of ebonite, the first lot should arrive in a week or two.

Thank you for looking, questions and comments welcome!

Tiaan Burger
Well-done Tiaan, gaan groot of gaan huistoe!
 
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