wine stopper assembly question

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mdwilliams999

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Apr 18, 2011
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Glenville, NY
I just started to make wine stoppers and did't feel that the threaded connection between the acrylic top and the SS stopper was a good strong fit, so I decided to add a little CA inside the acrylic hole (which I used a tapping tool on and was on a threaded chuck).

After I screwed the two together and a few minutes went by, I started to get some CA leaking out onto the acrylic and SS stopper making a mess and ruining the stopper. I'm guessing that there was just enough air pressure in there, combined with maybe to much CA, and possibly not enough space left.

Does anyone have any suggestions to avoid this in the future? I'm concerned that just screwing it together may not be strong enough and may come loose and/or strip away the threads. Not a good thing if you are trying to sell them and this happens to a customer.

Mike
 
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ohiococonut

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May 8, 2011
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If you're using a 5/16" drill bit to drill the hole you shouldn't have a problem. The bit that came with my kit was the wrong size.
 

beck3906

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Aug 13, 2005
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Belton, TX 76513
I use a small amount of epxoy to keep mine together. I have more problems with folks unscrewing them thinking they are a pen and looking for the ink fill.
 

monophoto

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Your analysis of the problem is probably correct. But I would add one other factor - - -

I think you used too much glue. You don't need to glue the components together - instead, all you want to do is lock the threads. Put a drop (ONLY) of thick CA or epoxy on the threads inside the turned top so that screwing the stud into the hole spreads the glue on the threads. Don't try to fill the hole with glue. Polyurethane glue will work, but its tendency to foam and expand increases the risk of getting excess glue coming out of the joint.

Second, a trick that helps manage this problem is to undercut the top of the stopper a bit. I use a 3/4" forstner bit to cut a recess about 1/16" deep in the bottom of the blank before drilling the 5/16" hole that then is threaded at 3/8" x 16tpi. Later, when the finished stopper is assembled, the metal base fits into that recess. That means that the turning extends slightly and covers the joint between the turning and the metal base. If any glue squeezes out, it will be hidden in the recess.
 

nava1uni

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San Francisco, CA, USA.
Your analysis of the problem is probably correct. But I would add one other factor - - -

I think you used too much glue. You don't need to glue the components together - instead, all you want to do is lock the threads. Put a drop (ONLY) of thick CA or epoxy on the threads inside the turned top so that screwing the stud into the hole spreads the glue on the threads. Don't try to fill the hole with glue. Polyurethane glue will work, but its tendency to foam and expand increases the risk of getting excess glue coming out of the joint.

Second, a trick that helps manage this problem is to undercut the top of the stopper a bit. I use a 3/4" forstner bit to cut a recess about 1/16" deep in the bottom of the blank before drilling the 5/16" hole that then is threaded at 3/8" x 16tpi. Later, when the finished stopper is assembled, the metal base fits into that recess. That means that the turning extends slightly and covers the joint between the turning and the metal base. If any glue squeezes out, it will be hidden in the recess.
I do this but I also only put a little CA or epoxy only on the end of the stopper and then screw the two pieces together. The glue is spread along the threads with only a tiny, if any excess, and it is hidden. If you use epoxy and there is any squeeze out you can clean it up with a cloth wet with 70% alcohol and it will be just fine.
 
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