ULTIMATE PEN SEGMENTING SLED

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GDIS46

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I have been wanting to get into segmenting but quickly realized you need a good table saw sled to do that. So I searched for as many ideas as I could and have come up with a basic design that will accomodate 0° vertical cuts for trimming blank width, 90° horizontal cuts for cutting blanks to the correct length, 30°, 45°, & 60° cuts for segmenting. It utilizes different module jigs for each cut. With this design the saw blade will always push the blank into the fence and against the stop. All jigs have horizontal toggle clamps to safely hold the material while cutting.

Please take a look at it and tell me what you think. Did I miss anything?
 

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TonyL

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Thank you for sharing this. I built my own from a design that another member created. The only thing I don't see, but may very well be there are two zero clearance rails that fit snugly into the groves of my saw table. I also added a block of wood that is attached to the rear fence that serves as somewhat of a safety. I must add that I am not anywhere near the wood worker that you folks are. I basically copied someone else's design. I did see that Rockler had one on sale last week.
 

jttheclockman

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I love jigs and made many and will continue to make them as needed. I looked at your diagram a couple times and have to say I do not understand it at all. I can not for the life of me figure out where the stock goes and where the jig portion goes. I am looking at the tracks and looks like you have the stock up against the track which is a no-no. I know I am missing something but if you are using this as a plan to make these for sale better plans with better detail are needed. Would like to see something with more detail and description if possible. Show where the blade is in relation to things. Show a blank on the jig. I could not make any more suggestions because I do not understand it. Sorry.

I too own 2 Dubby sleds but still made dedicated sleds for segmenting pen blanks. Cutting blanks to length does not require special sleds. Just a miter gauge.
 

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gtriever

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After looking at this closely, IMO you need to redesign your angle templates. As JT said, the t-track needs to be recessed into the template ; also, the clamps need to be relocated so you can clamp short pieces closer to the blade.

EDIT: Looking at it again, if the t-track is top-mounted along the edge of the angled templates it would work. Personally, for greater support I'd still prefer to see it recessed about an inch or so back from the edge of the templates.
 
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GDIS46

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1. The only thing I don't see, but may very well be there are two zero clearance rails that fit snugly into the groves of my saw table.

2. I also added a block of wood that is attached to the rear fence that serves as somewhat of a safety.
Thanks for your input.

1.My specs call for two Incra 18" adjustable rails. This version of the drawing didn't show them but the newest version does. I would add adjustment access holes in the sled base for adjusting.

2. Good point. I thought about the safety block but 90°, 60°, 45°, and 30° cuts are made in the middle of the sled so the blade never gets to the back fence. The only cut that doesn't is 0° blank width trimming. So I could add a notch in that jig to bring the working area back in the middle of the sled or add a safety block.
 

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GDIS46

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1. I looked at your diagram a couple times and have to say I do not understand it at all. I can not for the life of me figure out where the stock goes and where the jig portion goes.

2. I am looking at the tracks and looks like you have the stock up against the track which is a no-no.

3. I know I am missing something but if you are using this as a plan to make these for sale better plans with better detail are needed.

4.Would like to see something with more detail and description if possible. Show where the blade is in relation to things. Show a blank on the jig.

5. Cutting blanks to length does not require special sleds. Just a miter gauge.
Thanks for your input.

1. That is what I need to hear. This is a preliminary concept diagram.

2. I don't understand why that is a no-no.

3. This is a preliminary drawing which will progress as I get more feedback.

4. I will post some pictures when I get it built in different configurations.

5. Perhaps true but I wanted a single sled that would do all my cuts and using a sled is safer than using a miter gauge. My sled has hold downs so your fingers are not close to the blade.
 

GDIS46

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1. As JT said, the t-track needs to be recessed into the template;

2. also, the clamps need to be relocated so you can clamp short pieces closer to the blade.

3. Looking at it again, if the t-track is top-mounted along the edge of the angled templates it would work. Personally, for greater support I'd still prefer to see it recessed about an inch or so back from the edge of the templates.
Thanks for your feed-back.

1. They are recessed into the 3/4" jigs but this preliminary drawing doesn't show it.

2. Agree. I will do that.

3. I will experiment with a couple of different configurations. I was thinking of recessing a couple of horizontal mounting holes for additional support. Also, epoxying the rail to the jig might add additional support.

Note: I don't have an image of the horizontal toggle clamp with a transparent background so this looks a little kludgy.
 

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GDIS46

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I love jigs and made many and will continue to make them as needed. I looked at your diagram a couple times and have to say I do not understand it at all. I can not for the life of me figure out where the stock goes and where the jig portion goes. I am looking at the tracks and looks like you have the stock up against the track which is a no-no. I know I am missing something but if you are using this as a plan to make these for sale better plans with better detail are needed. Would like to see something with more detail and description if possible. Show where the blade is in relation to things. Show a blank on the jig. I could not make any more suggestions because I do not understand it. Sorry.

I too own 2 Dubby sleds but still made dedicated sleds for segmenting pen blanks. Cutting blanks to length does not require special sleds. Just a miter gauge.
================================================================================================

Per your request, here are a couple of drawings showing a vertical cut (page 2) and a horizontal cut (page 3). If you want to make an angle cut then one of the desired angle jigs fit on the left side of the sled replacing the horizontal jig. The vertical jig, on the right side of the sled, just gets slid to the right out of the way. It could be removed but there is no need. Let me know if you have any further questions.

================================================================================================
 

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Some observations:
1) With the vertical cut, the sled is nearly sliced in half. The only support holding the halves of the 1/2" birch together are the end fences. I think you will have to worry about flexing and warping.
2) When making the horizontal cut, the vertical template will need to be moved way back to prevent the cut off piece from potentially jamming against the template.
3) I assume this sled only fits one model or make of table saw since the runners are not adjustable.
 

jttheclockman

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I love jigs and made many and will continue to make them as needed. I looked at your diagram a couple times and have to say I do not understand it at all. I can not for the life of me figure out where the stock goes and where the jig portion goes. I am looking at the tracks and looks like you have the stock up against the track which is a no-no. I know I am missing something but if you are using this as a plan to make these for sale better plans with better detail are needed. Would like to see something with more detail and description if possible. Show where the blade is in relation to things. Show a blank on the jig. I could not make any more suggestions because I do not understand it. Sorry.

I too own 2 Dubby sleds but still made dedicated sleds for segmenting pen blanks. Cutting blanks to length does not require special sleds. Just a miter gauge.
================================================================================================

Per your request, here are a couple of drawings showing a vertical cut (page 2) and a horizontal cut (page 3). If you want to make an angle cut then one of the desired angle jigs fit on the left side of the sled replacing the horizontal jig. The vertical jig, on the right side of the sled, just gets slid to the right out of the way. It could be removed but there is no need. Let me know if you have any further questions.

================================================================================================

hello Gary

I see you are determined down this path. OK first off I do not see a need for that pink cut off part of the sled. You have to determine what side of the blade you want to make your cuts. Being it is a sled it does not matter just where you put your jigs. That piece that you have to make the 90 degree cutoffs just make that square to your blade so that it is 90 degrees for the cutoffs and 0 degrees for the slicing. Now recess a track in the top of this block holding back about 1" so that you can use a stop block and or just a clamp. They make both that ride in tracks. The reason I said you never ever run stock against a track is you are both counting they were manufactured to extreme tolerances and also when clamping something in them can distort the edge cause an inaccurate edge. Why take that chance. The more possible flaws you take out of the jig the better you are. Thus the reason for a jig in the first place.

You need to make the front and back rails about 4 " high to give rigidity to the jig. Remember you are cutting at least 1-1/2" deep into those rails with the thickness of material. I would make the back rail thick so that you can not push the blade through it when cutting or make a guard over the blade exit slot to protect yourself because sometimes the mind lapses and we forget the blade exiting that back rail and if that is where you set your hands up it could be a problem.

Next all those preset angles all all made predicating on a few things and that is your blade is set the same all the time it is used. There is no play in the rails that slide in the miter slots, and that the jig itself stays true and does not warp. The angles need to be cut after the back rail is set on the jig and are now cut in reference to that rail. It will take some exact measuring when doing this. You can not cut the angles using a miter gauge and then attach to the sled unless you do all cutting and marking off of the blade. That is the only true constant when making any sled. And again with those angle pieces I would use a track dadoed into the block about 1" in and use the same type clamps and stop blocks. The bottom track needs to be cut into the sled to accommodate the sliding bolt setup you are thinking.

The comparison to the dubby sled is an accurate one because it is doing similar to what you are attempting accept that it has tracks built into the top and side of the adjustable fence. yes it does not have a platform on both sides of the blade but one can be put there very easily. I have done this many times. The advantage of a dubby cutoff sled is it is infinite in adjustability with any angle you can think off. Plus you can do compound cutting without messing up the jig.

Not sure if I was clear on my suggestions but good luck as you move forward.
 
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GDIS46

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Some observations:
1) With the vertical cut, the sled is nearly sliced in half. The only support holding the halves of the 1/2" birch together are the end fences. I think you will have to worry about flexing and warping.
2) When making the horizontal cut, the vertical template will need to be moved way back to prevent the cut off piece from potentially jamming against the template.
3) I assume this sled only fits one model or make of table saw since the runners are not adjustable.
Thank you for your feedback.

1. Yes, the sled is cut in half as most sleds for traditional woodworking are. Perhaps the sled base should be increased to 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood but with 3/4" thick jigs, it limits the effective blade cutting height.

2. The vertical jig can be totally removed from the sled if clearance is a concern when doing other cuts.

3. I am not making it for resale so I don't care if it will transport from one saw to the next. If anyone wants to make one, they would make it for their particular saw. But that brings up another question. Are table saw runners standardized? I don't know.
 

jttheclockman

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Some observations:
1) With the vertical cut, the sled is nearly sliced in half. The only support holding the halves of the 1/2" birch together are the end fences. I think you will have to worry about flexing and warping.
2) When making the horizontal cut, the vertical template will need to be moved way back to prevent the cut off piece from potentially jamming against the template.
3) I assume this sled only fits one model or make of table saw since the runners are not adjustable.
Thank you for your feedback.

1. Yes, the sled is cut in half as most sleds for traditional woodworking are. Perhaps the sled base should be increased to 3/4" Baltic Birch plywood but with 3/4" thick jigs, it limits the effective blade cutting height.

2. The vertical jig can be totally removed from the sled if clearance is a concern when doing other cuts.

3. I am not making it for resale so I don't care if it will transport from one saw to the next. If anyone wants to make one, they would make it for their particular saw. But that brings up another question. Are table saw runners standardized? I don't know.

The answer to this question is no. The larger saws on the market are 3/4" wide . slots Depth could vary. Table top models and micro saws all could be different. Makes no difference because as I said each sled must be made off the blade's axis. The back fence needs to be 90 degrees to the side of the blade and all jigs need to work off that. You can not use the miter slots as your bench mark. This goes for any type saw including bandsaws.

The base of the sled needs to be 3/4" for stability and for allowing those tracks underneath for the hold down bolts you show. When you say depth of cut is a concern then you are not working with a 10" blade. If you are working with a 10" full size saw and using a 7-1/4" blade for thinness, they do make thin 10" saw blades too.

I believe there are examples of this type sleds in the library here. You may want to check it out or do a google search for other examples and it may inspire you more so. Good luck.
 

gtriever

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If you already know this, my apologies in advance. - - Most, but not all miter slots are 3/4 inch wide by approx 3/8 deep. Measure yours to determine the size of the runner(s). The blade should be aligned to the miter slot and then the front and rear fences are aligned perpendicular to that.
A 3/4 base will leave you plenty of blade height for pen segmenting cuts. Unlike some, I make my sleds from 3/4 MDF instead of plywood since MDF is less likely to deform.

Good luck with your project, and post pics when it's finished!
 

Bryguy

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I'd add that given the size of the pieces we work with a sled is a must. A friend of mine lost all the fingers of his left hand last week (they were able to reattach them) on his table saw. Table saws are the most dangerous of the equipment we work with and every precaution should be taken. Hands should never, ever get near the blade.
 

jttheclockman

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I'd add that given the size of the pieces we work with a sled is a must. A friend of mine lost all the fingers of his left hand last week (they were able to reattach them) on his table saw. Table saws are the most dangerous of the equipment we work with and every precaution should be taken. Hands should never, ever get near the blade.
Sorry to read this. I will say this and I always disagree with this statement that the tablesaw is the most dangerous tool in the shop. I believe it is the operator that is the most dangerous. All machines are dangerous and having the knowledge to operate them properly and safely is a must. Tablesaws get the bad rap because they probably are the most common tool in a woodworking shop. But I believe the more dangerous tool is a router. That bit spins at a higher rate than a blade and is exposed alot more in the operations it is asked to perform than a tablesaw blade if a guard is not used. Weather set up in a table or free hand the power to do instant harm is tremendous. Again if wood is fed into the bit the wrong way or not secured properly can be very harmful and there are alot more bits and operations to choose from to use a router. But more people use a tablesaw than routers.

With that said having a working knowledge and being aware of every move with each operation of tool is paramount when it comes to shop safety. Do not work with tools when in a hurry, do not become complacent, do not work with tools when tired and use and follow all safety precautions when working with any tools in the shop. Work safe and work smart.
 

jttheclockman

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After reading all the comments it is clear to me that if you ask two woodworkers a question, you get four answers. LOL
I think in this case he is looking for suggestions to improve his idea. Will it work yes if he takes some of mine and others recommendations into his thought process. Is there a better way, well there are other ways and other sleds that maybe more economical in the long run and more versatile such as the Dubby sled. I have 2 sets of those and I still made dedicated sleds for some of the pen work we do. Making jigs can be half the fun sometimes.:)
 

moke

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I have been following this thread and I like the concept. Repeatable angular cuts with interchangeable inserts.....kind of cool.

I agree with a lot of what has been said.....
1. After hearing of the terrible accident, I can't help but believe a sled would have maybe helped. Accidents are primarily caused by kick backs which a TS is famous for. I too, have friend that lost three finger due to kickbacks. But I agree with JT...my shop has many dangerous tools, the one that scares me the most is a jointer. It would not only cut off your fingers but grind them into hamburger. IMHO a sled is a huge safety plus. Maybe even put a guard where the blade would emerge.

2. The t tracks are a good idea, but MUST be kept clean from build up of saw dust other wise your accuracy is gone. Please pull them back at 1/4 from the blade....as a saw stop owner that looks like money waiting to be thrown away on a new cartridge and blade.

3. A blank is relatively the same size....why not put the hold down on the opposite side? On the longer angles it will help with control and holding power.

4. I own a Dubby....have for years....it's a nice sled but nothing like this. It may perform similarly but not even close in design.

5. It looks huge....if it is dedicated to pen blanks why do you need so much space.

6. I like the repeatabity with insert idea, but it is imperative that the insert nestle into exactly the same place EVERY time, otherwise your repeatablity has gone out the window.

7. Do I understand this is based off of a Rockler jig as a base? Why not build your own. Search for William Ng on you tube and look at his sleds and reduce the size...As we all know Rockler doesn't give anything away for cheap! William Ng has some excellent ideas that have been tested to be correct by lots and lots of woodworkers.

Like I said I think the idea has some merit....and I agree with what has been said, there are multiple sleds out there that are very well designed and in use I might add.

This was posted many moons ago, by an awesome penmaker. Somewhere along the line, it was suggested to use angle guides for holding the pieces better, I have been using that modifaction for a long time.
http://www.penturners.org/forum/f30/mini-sled-39234/

I would take a photo of mine, but my wife is having a two weekend garage sale starting Thursday and any hope of getting to it is long since dashed!

Just my .02!
 
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Chris Labedz

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Personal preference I would make the base out of 3/4" and the jigs out of 1/2". If I see correctly this would give your knobs more securing pressure when tightening into 3/4" base. Look forward to see what else you come up with.
 

GDIS46

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If you already know this, my apologies in advance. - - Most, but not all miter slots are 3/4 inch wide by approx 3/8 deep. Measure yours to determine the size of the runner(s). The blade should be aligned to the miter slot and then the front and rear fences are aligned perpendicular to that.
A 3/4 base will leave you plenty of blade height for pen segmenting cuts. Unlike some, I make my sleds from 3/4 MDF instead of plywood since MDF is less likely to deform.

Good luck with your project, and post pics when it's finished!
I have a 10" JET Cabinet saw and am using two 18" adjustable Incra miter slot runners for this project. I was considering using MDF for the base but when I thought I should try to make it thinner for more blade height, I chose 1/2" baltic birch plywood for the base. I am now reconsidering using a 3/4" base per upon your input. I have never had baltic birch plywood deform in over 40 years of woodworking so I will probably stick with that.
 

GDIS46

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After reading all the comments it is clear to me that if you ask two woodworkers a question, you get four answers. LOL
I think in this case he is looking for suggestions to improve his idea. Will it work yes if he takes some of mine and others recommendations into his thought process. Is there a better way, well there are other ways and other sleds that maybe more economical in the long run and more versatile such as the Dubby sled. I have 2 sets of those and I still made dedicated sleds for some of the pen work we do. Making jigs can be half the fun sometimes.:)
How about posting some pictures of segmented pens you have made with your dubby sled? I would love to see what it can do.
 

GDIS46

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1. Maybe even put a guard where the blade would emerge.

2. Please pull them back at 1/4 from the blade.

3. why not put the hold down on the opposite side?

4. I own a Dubby....It may perform similarly but not even close in design.

5. It looks huge....if it is dedicated to pen blanks why do you need so much space.

6. I like the repeatability with insert idea, but it is imperative that the insert nestle into exactly the same place EVERY time, otherwise your repeatablity has gone out the window.

7. Do I understand this is based off of a Rockler jig as a base? Why not build your own.

8. Search for William Ng on you tube and look at his sleds and reduce the size.
Thanks for the excellent feedback, Mike, from an old Iowa City boy.

1. There is a blade guard on the current version. See page 1 drawing.

2. I thought the rail should provide a zero clearance to avoid chip out. It is insulated electronically from the saw base. Will reconsider your suggestion.

3. Hold-downs on the opposite side would have to be secured to the sled, not on the jig. That limits the sled from being used for general purpose without jigs.

4. Thank you. The dubby isn't repeatable based upon a fixed reference point.

5. As the spec says, it is 16" x 20" so that is a medium size sled. I could make it smaller but that would limit it for general purpose woodworking. Will consider for final version.

6. I think the jigs are pretty much fixed when screwed down but maybe I should add some brass reference pins so it is 100% in the same spot every time.

7. It is not based on the Rockler mini-sled. It is built from scratch.

8. If you read the text on page 1 of the current drawing, you will see it references William Ng and his 5 cut method for aligning the rear fence.

Here are the latest versions of the plans which are now up to 3 pages:
 

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GDIS46

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Personal preference I would make the base out of 3/4" and the jigs out of 1/2". If I see correctly this would give your knobs more securing pressure when tightening into 3/4" base. Look forward to see what else you come up with.
Based upon previous input, I am changing the sled's base spec to 3/4" but will retain 3/4" jig spec. The jigs need to be 3/4" for adequate support of the t-track.

FYI: my first design was a similar sled with a dubby style arm on the left with a digital readout for repeatability. The only jig it would have used was the one on the right for vertical trim cuts. I thought this fixed jig idea would be a better.
 

jttheclockman

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After reading all the comments it is clear to me that if you ask two woodworkers a question, you get four answers. LOL
I think in this case he is looking for suggestions to improve his idea. Will it work yes if he takes some of mine and others recommendations into his thought process. Is there a better way, well there are other ways and other sleds that maybe more economical in the long run and more versatile such as the Dubby sled. I have 2 sets of those and I still made dedicated sleds for some of the pen work we do. Making jigs can be half the fun sometimes.:)
How about posting some pictures of segmented pens you have made with your dubby sled? I would love to see what it can do.
Hello Gary

I do not use my Dubby sled to make segmented pens. I use it for picture frames and also boxes especially when doing more than a 4 sided project. As I said I have made dedicated sleds for doing pen segments. I have shown you one which is a 45 degree. I have a 60 degree and a 22.5. I can make them to any degree I feel a need for.

Basically what you are making is a wedgie sled. there are many on the market and can use 2 different approaches. They can ride in the miter tracks as yours does or it can ride against the fence. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Just a matter of choice. The Dubby sled that is being mentioned is a variable sled in that it does not need fixed fences such as mine or yours. I really do not want to take the time and write up another whole explanation of what can be done. But if you were to make a variable fence instead of the fixed angles portions you can make your sled more valuable and just as easy to use. I use machinist squares and draftsman angles to get me all angles in my shop and you can do the same and eliminate those angled sleds. Place the draftsman angle against blade and you now have correct angle to set your sliding fence. That is how a dubby sled can be set as well or you can use the steel guage on the side of the sled if you tune it in just right.

I bring this up because with each angle portion you add you can add error to your set up. If you make an adjustable fence or a swinging fence once it is set there is no more errors. Use the fixed angle finders and lock it down. Have all your stop blocks and hold down clamps attached to the fence. I am not discouraging you at all. You are trying to build a sled that will help you in the long run and I commend you for it. keep at it. Just look around what others have done and maybe take some of their ideas and combine with yours. Good luck.

Again as I said I made dedicated sleds for segmenting pens as well as I segment on my lathe using a router.
 

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GDIS46

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1. Makes no difference because as I said each sled must be made off the blade's axis. The back fence needs to be 90 degrees to the side of the blade and all jigs need to work off that. You can not use the miter slots as your bench mark. This goes for any type saw including bandsaws.

2. The base of the sled needs to be 3/4" for stability and for allowing those tracks underneath for the hold down bolts you show. When you say depth of cut is a concern then you are not working with a 10" blade. If you are working with a 10" full size saw and using a 7-1/4" blade for thinness, they do make thin 10" saw blades too.

3. I believe there are examples of this type sleds in the library here. You may want to check it out or do a google search for other examples and it may inspire you more so. Good luck.
===============================================

Thanks for your input.

1. I was taught a little different than that. The miter slot is the primary reference point to which all others are referenced because it is non-adjustable.
....a. The blade is first adjusted to be parallel with the miter slot.
....b. The fence is adjusted to be parallel with the miter slot (and blade).
....c. The miter gauge is then squared to the miter slot (for 90° cuts).
....d. All jigs are referenced off the miter slot and by doing so are square to the blade.

2. The sled base is now at 3/4".

3. I looked in the library and did not find much there regarding jigs.
 
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jttheclockman

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1. Makes no difference because as I said each sled must be made off the blade's axis. The back fence needs to be 90 degrees to the side of the blade and all jigs need to work off that. You can not use the miter slots as your bench mark. This goes for any type saw including bandsaws.

2. The base of the sled needs to be 3/4" for stability and for allowing those tracks underneath for the hold down bolts you show. When you say depth of cut is a concern then you are not working with a 10" blade. If you are working with a 10" full size saw and using a 7-1/4" blade for thinness, they do make thin 10" saw blades too.

3. I believe there are examples of this type sleds in the library here. You may want to check it out or do a google search for other examples and it may inspire you more so. Good luck.
===============================================

Thanks for your input.

1. I was taught a little different than that. The miter slot is the primary reference point to which all others are referenced because it is non-adjustable.
....a. The blade is adjusted to be parallel with the miter slot.
....b. The fence is adjusted to be parallel with the miter slot (and blade).
....c. The miter gauge is then squared to the miter slot (for 90° cuts).
....d. All jigs are referenced off the miter slot and by doing so are square to the blade.

2. The sled base is now at 3/4".

3. I looked in the library and did not find much there regarding jigs.

Yes and no

Yes a miter slot is not adjustable and it is the most true reference point on the saw. But the blade is adjusted to the miter slot to the best of its ability. ( I defy you to get dead on on any saw) This is usually done one of 2 ways. Adjust the table top to the fixed blade or adjust the trunions ( blade setup)to the table top. Now you have to rely on the slots being true to each other and true the length of the saw top. All good quality saws are proven so. Now the fence is adjusted to the blade and not the miter slots. The miter gauge is adjusted to the blade not the miter slots. All jigs are referenced off the blade. Unless that blade moves and unless you check it from time to time you do not know.

If you lay a machinist square (most accurate) or a draftsman angle against the flat of a blade (not touching any teeth) there is no truer reference point unless your blade is warped or bent (then you have a bigger problem) You are now referencing off the blade which is doing the cutting. Whenever I set my miter gauge I always am changinging angles so I just use a machinist square to reset and do not rely on the gauge marks. I from time to time check measurements against the blade both ends to check fence.

When making a jig, what is the first thing you do?? Lay the sled base down on some runners. Now cut your slot in the base or cut the base off if making a one sided base. You add that back fence 90 degrees to the slot cut in the base or what I do is just again lay a machinist square against the flat of the blade and square that back fence. The front fence does not matter unless you are using for reference for something. Then you do the same as back fence. You never secure your wood against the front fence because of the direction the blade spins. It will lift the piece. Now any other guides or jigs you build can be referenced off the blade. (even if that blade is mm out the sled is built to to the blade not the miter slots)

Hope this makes sense.

As an example, look at my sled. I could have layed that base wood on any angle and it would not make a difference. because when I cut the slot in the base wood that became the reference point or benchmark where I place my fences. Using a 45 degree draftsman angle off the slot (or blade) gave me the exact place to secure my fences.

Here is another quick jig I made to cut slivers for segmenting pens. This one is built off my miter gauge but again is reference off the blade for accurracy.
 

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GDIS46

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I use the MasterGage SB-1 SuperBar and MasterPlate to adjust my blade (tunions) to the miter slot and it is now pretty much dead-on. Also it can be used to check the fence to see if it is in adjustment. Which reminds me that I should probably recheck this again since it has been a year since I last did it.

The body of the MasterGage SB-1 SuperBar, with its unique patent pending adjustment system, assures glass smooth motion in the full length of table saw miter slot. The SuperBar has an on-board dial Indicator that gives you machine shop accuracy to 1/1000 of an inch. Now you can make dangerous misalignment visible and accurately set the 10 critical table saw adjustments required for maximum saw performance. The package comes with complete instructions, plus free technical support from the manufacturer. For maximum results, use the MasterPlate with the SuperBar. (Shown with Master Plate G7582). Has an on-board precision dial indicator that reads to one thousandths [1/1000] of an inch Dial indicator extensions allow the SuperBar to fit most table saws. SuperBar has both coarse and fine adjustments that insure smooth, accurate motion along the full length of the miter slot. The SuperBar "outrigger rods" ride on the saw table surface.
 

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jttheclockman

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I use the MasterGage SB-1 SuperBar and MasterPlate to adjust my blade (tunions) to the miter slot and it is now pretty much dead-on. Also it can be used to check the fence to see if it is in adjustment. Which reminds me that I should probably recheck this again since it has been a year since I last did it.

The body of the MasterGage SB-1 SuperBar, with its unique patent pending adjustment system, assures glass smooth motion in the full length of table saw miter slot. The SuperBar has an on-board dial Indicator that gives you machine shop accuracy to 1/1000 of an inch. Now you can make dangerous misalignment visible and accurately set the 10 critical table saw adjustments required for maximum saw performance. The package comes with complete instructions, plus free technical support from the manufacturer. For maximum results, use the MasterPlate with the SuperBar. (Shown with Master Plate G7582). Has an on-board precision dial indicator that reads to one thousandths [1/1000] of an inch Dial indicator extensions allow the SuperBar to fit most table saws. SuperBar has both coarse and fine adjustments that insure smooth, accurate motion along the full length of the miter slot. The SuperBar "outrigger rods" ride on the saw table surface.

And they are all pretty tools.

I have the A-Line-It by in-line industries system that I have used to set my tablesaw, it also checks drill press, router, lathe runout, set blades on jointer.
A-LINE-IT System - In-Line Industries - Woodworking Tools & Tips

I also have the Exact Cuts system for my tablesaw. They all are collecting dust in the cabinet. Very rare occasion I will check a tool.

I mean no disrespect to you and you use whatever tools you need to make adjustments. But when setting a fence for a rip cut do you pull that tool out or do you use a rule?? As long as the front tooth and rear tooth are at least equal or a smidge further in the rear the fence is parallel to the blade. Has to be. The miter gauge. I never go by the marks or presets on a miter gauge. Have my square up against the side of the blade and that miter has to be 90 degrees to the blade. has to be. No fancy tools. Same with setting angles. I have recently bought a digital angle finder and have run it through a few tests and it is dead on set to my blade.

As I said blade set to miter slot, fence and miter gauge set to blade No other way is accurate. You said yourself "pretty much dead on" In woodworking that is close enough for we are working with material that moves on its own anyway. The idea is to and brings us back to why you are making the sled, ease of making cuts that are not basic and repeatability. How you make that sled will all come off that blade. You may not want to admit it but that is what has to be if you want accuracy. Good luck. I am done with this conversation. I have given you all my input and wish you well.
 

Woodchipper

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My dilemma is I have a Bosch BT3000 table saw that has no miter slots. Trying how to make something to cut angles for segmenting pens, etc.
 

jttheclockman

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My dilemma is I have a Bosch BT3000 table saw that has no miter slots. Trying how to make something to cut angles for segmenting pens, etc.
Are you sure that is not a Ryobi saw?? I have never seen a table saw without miter slots.

Does it have extension wings on it for a router or any extension wings on it??

My suggestion without seeing it and hope you post a photo, would be to make a sled that has the runners on the side of the table. In other words the sled stays flat on the table top and there are hardwood or aluminum runners under the table and ride on the sides of the top if there is no obstructions. Again really would need to see this saw. I could not find it when I googled it.


What is the top made of?? Could it be possible to router a couple slots in the top if it is a composite material and not steel?? Again need to see but gave you a couple suggestions to start with. If it has a fence it is possible to build off that too. More involved but possible.
 
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GDIS46

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My dilemma is I have a Bosch BT3000 table saw that has no miter slots. Trying how to make something to cut angles for segmenting pens, etc.
The Bosch portable does not come in a model BT3000 and all Bosch models have miter slots so I assume you are referring to the Ryobie BT3000. That is a very unusual configuration. It looks like the table splits and miter slots can be inserted. Is that correct?
 

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GDIS46

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Getting ready to make the sled now that I think I have all the issues ironed out. Only an actual usage will tell for sure.

But I have a question:
Should I make a prototype out of MDF or go straight for Baltic Birch plywood?
 
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jttheclockman

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Getting ready to make the sled now that I think I have all the issues ironed out. Only an actual usage will tell for sure.

But I have a question:
Should I make a prototype out of MDF or go straight for Baltic Birch plywood?

Why would you need a prototype??? You will not get the same results with MDF. no way to screw things in without inserts.

I have a question for you----- how are you making the angles that are the main part of the sled and how are you cutting them???
 
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