Gorilla Glue question

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Warren White

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Perhaps this is one of the imponderables of the world, but I will ask anyway.

How does one know (other than the obvious "my brass tube just fell out of the blank" experience) when is it a good idea to just throw out the remains of a bottle of Gorilla Glue and buy another one?

I really like to use the white Gorilla Glue to glue the brass tubes in both wood and acrylic, but the last time I had this little nagging concern that it might be time to bite the bullet and buy another tube.

Any thoughts/practices?
 
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Warren White

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According to the label...

... "Bonds: Wood, stone, metal, ceramic, glass and more!"

I have had nothing but success using it for both wood and acrylic pens. It is my go-to glue, after having some issues with CA (my fault, I am sure), and epoxy (messy and it does go bad after a while).

Thanks for the inquiry, though.
 

mark james

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I typically use 2-part epoxy, but the question remains.

I have bought a set (2 - 8 oz tubes) in December for the past 4 years. I have used a black magic marker and written the date bought, on the tubes. I have then bought a xmas stocking stuffer for MYSELF the past 3 years (evil Santa doesn't think of epoxy). Typically I am almost done with the epoxy after 12 months.

So, I replace annually. But I will also say that I have gone 18 months before opening a new set, as I was lazy the year prior. I just shifted my annual replacement dates.
 

PenPal

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Hi mate I have used the white when I accidentally bought it one time not knowing it existed wanting the original poly. I am back on the poly now.

As I glue up with the ply I use an elastic band end for end to ensure the brass does not pop out from the blank ,this happened to me once. I never use water as some do with this glue. IMHO it sticks like tar to a tomcat,never had a failure with both types.

My white stuff seems to last for ever or at least a long time.

Adopting my wifes method of opening the bottle ,not squeezing it out but using a skinny paddle pop stick I apply the glue to the inside of the blank and on the brass.

Messy but I use a potato plug one end thinking of using one both ends always using vynal gloves.

Kind regards Peter.
 

leehljp

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... "Bonds: Wood, stone, metal, ceramic, glass and more!"

. . . after having some issues with CA (my fault, I am sure), and epoxy (messy and it does go bad after a while).

Thanks for the inquiry, though.
If you think epoxy is messy, then stay away from Gorilla polyurethane! :biggrin:

Please give us a report on the white glue for pen making. The primary glues for general pen making are: CA, Epoxy and polyurethane (the expanding foam).
 

monophoto

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I get rid of mine when it becomes thick and hard to "pour".[/QUOT.

Ageee

I generally purchase glues in large containers for economy. But with polyethylene glues, my experience is that I don’t use it often enough, and it typically goes bad before I finish the bottle. So I choose to buy only small bottles.

There is now a white version of Gorilla-brand polyurethane glue. So far, I can’t see any difference compared with the original version other than the color.
 
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Woodchipper

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FWIW, Gorilla glue expands when curing. FWIW, custom fishing rod builders, including me, don't use it as it becomes a mess to clean up the ooze.
 

TonyL

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I can't answer for gorilla glue, but i have had the clear part of Mercury's epoxy congeal/get lumpy. Twice I mixed it with the light amber part (hardener) and tested it on a paper plate. It hardened fine. I did use it to glue several tubes after performing this test and it appears to work fine. In fact, after stirring it around with the clear part, it turned into the same consistency as the fresh looking stuff. I don't like risking things though. I am going to call Mercury and see what they say. Maybe they will replace the part.

It was definitely too think to squeeze out. I had to scoop it out with a wooden stick.
 
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Warren White

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Thank you all!

All of the responses have been greatly appreciated. Hi to my dear friend Peter, who uses a similar glue and procedure as I do.

Terry's, Lou's and Louie's responses that they get rid of glue when it is too thick and hard to pour really hit a chord with me. That is when my first inkling that a problem might surface. I also liked Mark's suggestion of dating and getting rid of it after a year. When I was using epoxy, I bought a 8 ounce bottles of T-88 because it was very strong. I don't know what I was thinking! I wouldn't use that up in 3 lifetimes...

Hank wanted a report of my use of White Gorilla Glue. I scuff the tubes, and I do use just the lightest amount of water inside the blanks; applied with a LIGHTLY moistened q-tip. Careful here with some wood blanks, because depending on the species, they can swell up to the point you have to redrill! I have experienced that only once, but once was enough!

I plug both ends of the tube with Plumber's Putty which has been flattened out on a piece of waxed paper. Supplies on hand before I begin: two popsicle sticks to clean off the ends of the tubes; a spare tube to move the glued tube where I want it inside the blank; roll of blue tape to go around the glued up blank a couple of times end to end; nitrile gloves; a couple of paper towels to clean up the mess; another piece of waxed paper to set the glued up blanks on when they are done.

The glue is applied in two lines down 3/4 of the tube and the tube is put into the blank. When it it a 2 piece blank, I start on the end opposite of where the two should match up. Twist, in and out, twist, in and out, then remove it and apply glue to the remaining side and put it in the opposite end. Same twist, in and out, etc.

I cut my blanks about 1/8" long on both ends, so I use a sacrificial tube to get just the right amount of blank on the matching end of the tubes to be able to sand down using Rick Herrell's Offset sanding jig (GREAT TOOL!!!). I wrap the blank with blue tape and let it set for several hours before I unwrap it and use an appropriately sized steel pin to push the Plumber's Putty out and clean up what is left behind with an exacto blade and round brush.

I have NEVER had a failure with this glue. I experience difficulties with CA (only once or twice) when I tried to glue the tube in when the acrylic blank was warm from drilling and the glue seized when the tube was half way in.

This is certainly more detail that anyone wanted, but I really appreciate the help I get on this forum, and if I have given anyone an idea, I am happy to do so.

I am off to buy a new small bottle of glue!
 

Dehn0045

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I think that there might be some confusion about "white" gorilla glue. The "white" is actually the clear liquid polyurethane glue, but it is called "white" because it is white when it dries.

FWIW - I like using gorilla glue for gluing tubes. I did have one time where the foaming expansion forced the tube out a little while it was drying, but it wasn't enough to cause a problem. It does foam up a lot, but I find it easier to clean from the inside of the tube compared to CA or epoxy.
 

Herb G

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When in doubt, throw it out.
Check the expiration date.
Every bottle of glue I've bought in the last 35 years had one.
If you can't read the code, call the people who made it & they will tell you.

Pretty simple, actually.

:wink:
 

PenPal

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Coincidence in the middle of preparing 12 Aussie Slimlines with a few American timbers. Tools I use for clean up before squaring the ends and turning. Tools used old reamer for first entry,then step drill I have been using for at least 30 yrs snug fit in tubes,then the craft knife.

The Original Poly Gue used.

Kind regards Peter.
 

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bsshog40

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I used the clear gorilla glue for all the pens that I segmented and any other wood I was gluing together. I've never had a problem with it. I even used it on one of my acrylic pens where I had to paint the tube and used it to glue the tube in. No problem there either.
 
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