Carbide tools

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campzeke

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Jun 28, 2015
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Being fairly new to turning I wanted to try using the carbide tools but didn't want to turn loose of the cash and opted to try making my own. Here are a few photos of what I came up with. Total cost for both tools is less than $40.

24 inches of 1/2' 1018 steel bar stock
2 3/4" copper pipe couplers
Carbide cutters (from Captain Eddie)
10-24 tap and drill bit
A little shop time, some elbow grease and quart of "Want To".

I guess the bottom line is anyone can make these and I can't see the $70-80 commercial made tools working any better.

C&C Welcome. ....
 

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stonepecker

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Oct 29, 2012
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central Minnesota
They look as good as anything else I have seen.
Commerical or home-made....... it is what you do with it that counts.

Now lets see you post a few pictures of the pens you made.
Congrats on your new tools.
 

low_48

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Jul 1, 2004
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Peoria, IL, USA.
I would be curious if you get any rotation of the cutters during use. The production tools use a tapered shank screw, and a fairly close shoulder on the square cutter, to eliminate rotation. Let us know how they work, thanks.
 

chrisb1963

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Jun 18, 2015
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greenup,il
carbide

i have the exact tools love them did i say i love them , the round one is almost to agresssive but the square is perfect round is roughing tool really sharp tools about all i use..
 

magpens

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Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Nice going !!!!

What is the correct technical specification for the screws you used , please ?

Do you get those from Cap'n Eddie ?
 
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campzeke

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Jun 28, 2015
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Tampa, FL
I have not had any problems with cutter rotation during use but I did make sure I tightened them securely before I tried to use them. The screws I used came with the cutters I purchased from Captain Eddy.

I have used the tools on wood, acrylic and deer antler. Performance on wood was ok..... jury is still out. Acrylic was so so, they seem to chip the material away rather than cut. Deer antler cut like butter. I have only turned 1 of each and will keep working with them. I suspect they are like any new tool, you have to learn how it works best for your application then use it where it works best for you.

Thanks to everyone for your compliments and feedback. The tools and my turning are both a work in progress.

Merry Christmas
Campzeke
 

wingnut720

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Aug 7, 2014
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Mechanicsville, VA
Great Job!!!

Campzeke...your chisels look GREAT!!! I, too, decided to make my own carbide chisels due to the $$$ demanded for the "store bought" ones. I made three mid-size chisels using 3/8" bar stock and the name brand cutters available at Woodcraft. I am now in the process of making four "full-size" chisels out of the 1/2" bar stock. I shopped around, and after considering several outlets, went to "AZ Carbide" for my cutters. They are beautiful and the price was great. I know Capt. Eddie offers cutters, but in the future if you need to shop, check out azcarbide.com I think you will be very impressed with the cutters Dale has to offer. Blessings, Alvin P
 

qquake

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Feb 8, 2004
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Northern California
Resurrecting an old thread here. I have the small EWT carbide cutter, but would like the bigger one. I too don't want to pay the prices for their large handles, and have decided to try making my own. I'll be using 15mm radius cutters from AZ Carbide. Can you tell me how you cut the "notch" in the front of your bars?
 

campzeke

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Jun 28, 2015
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Resurrecting an old thread here. I have the small EWT carbide cutter, but would like the bigger one. I too don't want to pay the prices for their large handles, and have decided to try making my own. I'll be using 15mm radius cutters from AZ Carbide. Can you tell me how you cut the "notch" in the front of your bars?
To notch the bars I started by figuring out where I wanted the mounting hole. I then drilled and tapped the mounting hole. Then I marked the back side of the notch and carefully cut along the line with a hack saw to the depth of the notch. I then ground the recess on my bench grinder and finished smoothing with a file. I also counter sunk the mounting hole slightly to make sure there were no burrs. BE CAREFUL to make sure you get the area where the carbide sits as flat as possible. if that area is not flat, you could crack the carbide cutter when you tighten the screw. It takes a little time and effort but in my opinion it is time well spent.

That said, I am not sure you even need to recess the cutter. The recess does offer some protection for the cutter but other than that I think it is more a matter of aesthetics than anything else.

I use my homemade carbide tools almost every day and love them. There is just something about using a tool I made to make something else. Making my own jigs, fixtures and tools is one of the most enjoyable parts of this awesome hobby.
 

qquake

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Joined
Feb 8, 2004
Messages
2,632
Location
Northern California
Resurrecting an old thread here. I have the small EWT carbide cutter, but would like the bigger one. I too don't want to pay the prices for their large handles, and have decided to try making my own. I'll be using 15mm radius cutters from AZ Carbide. Can you tell me how you cut the "notch" in the front of your bars?
To notch the bars I started by figuring out where I wanted the mounting hole. I then drilled and tapped the mounting hole. Then I marked the back side of the notch and carefully cut along the line with a hack saw to the depth of the notch. I then ground the recess on my bench grinder and finished smoothing with a file. I also counter sunk the mounting hole slightly to make sure there were no burrs. BE CAREFUL to make sure you get the area where the carbide sits as flat as possible. if that area is not flat, you could crack the carbide cutter when you tighten the screw. It takes a little time and effort but in my opinion it is time well spent.

That said, I am not sure you even need to recess the cutter. The recess does offer some protection for the cutter but other than that I think it is more a matter of aesthetics than anything else.

I use my homemade carbide tools almost every day and love them. There is just something about using a tool I made to make something else. Making my own jigs, fixtures and tools is one of the most enjoyable parts of this awesome hobby.
I definitely want the notch, to protect the back edge of the insert. And also to help keeping my thumb from getting cut. I have a habit or rubbing the chisel to remove the dust.
 
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