What is This Wood?

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vtgaryw

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Messages
594
Location
Milton, VT
OK, I usually try not to post these, but..

Yesterday, I was doing a pen turning demo at my local Artist's Guild as part of a statewide Open Studios event. I had a blast. At the end of the day, a fellow from the local community I didn't know stopped by and told me he was a bowl turner and that he had an interesting piece of wood he couldn't use. He went home and brought it to me just as I was cleaning up. What a great community turners are!

Anyways, he said he rescued it from his firewood pile. This is northwestern Vermont, he was thinking maybe red elm? It's a very heavy dense piece. Very dry, no odor. Couldn't find a similar picture in any of the wood databases.
 

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1080Wayne

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Joined
Feb 5, 2006
Messages
2,619
Location
Brownfield, Alberta, Canada.
Think you will have to sand down a piece of end grain and look at it under 8-10 power magnification to be sure . Red elm (slippery elm) has earlywood that is 2-6 pores wide , American elm has 1 row of large earlywood pores , winged elm an intermittent row of very small pores . All three have the characteristic elm latewood pores in wavy bands . The heartwood of red elm may fluoresce dim yellow green .

All of this taken from `Identifying wood` by R Bruce Hoadley .
 
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