speed to micro mesh

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mark james

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Medina, Ohio
I don't bother to adjust the belt after final turning. After final turning, abranet at speed - 2400-3600; micromesh at the same speed. BUT, at this point you are not removing material, just removing scratches and polishing.

I do not use a lot of pressure, let the pads do their work on the scratches. I use water liberally, wipe of the slurry, next grit.

So, 2400-3600, whatever last turning speed I was at.
 

WriteON

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Lake Worth,Fl. / BlueBell, Pa.
Aside from speed....pressure and touch is everything. Do not press hard on the pad. Keep it wet. I use a spray bottle. I vary the speed. You'll know after a few finishes.
When I'm satisfied with the sanding...I finish with Novus 3,2,1.
 
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1080Wayne

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Brownfield, Alberta, Canada.
I don't bother to adjust the belt after final turning. After final turning, abranet at speed - 2400-3600; micromesh at the same speed. BUT, at this point you are not removing material, just removing scratches and polishing.

I do not use a lot of pressure, let the pads do their work on the scratches. I use water liberally, wipe of the slurry, next grit.

So, 2400-3600, whatever last turning speed I was at.

Uh Mark , the slurry you are removing is material (finish) that has been sanded off to reduce the barrel diameter by an amount about equal to twice the depth of the deepest scratch . It is only immaterial if that process hasn`t appreciably changed the match to the components . Polishing with wax temporarily hides scratches , but customers will probably find them , sooner or later .
 

jttheclockman

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I am guessing I am in the 1000 range. Bump it up a little after applying CA It becomes a guess. I too use water all the time. Do not spend too much time with them and finally add a polish. If i can not see scratches with the naked eye it is good enough for me. Have yet to see anyone walking around with a loop when buying any of my pens. :):):)
 

BURLMAN

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I mm at my last turning speed, using a very light touch, and only for a couple of passes before moving on to the next pad. I dry mm wood and wet mm acrylics, aluminite,etc. Question for those who wet mm all the time: does that not introduce moisture to a wood blank, thereby increasing the risk of a cloudy CA finish (assuming you use a CA finish)?
 

gtriever

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Paducah, Kentucky
I mm at my last turning speed, using a very light touch, and only for a couple of passes before moving on to the next pad. I dry mm wood and wet mm acrylics, aluminite,etc. Question for those who wet mm all the time: does that not introduce moisture to a wood blank, thereby increasing the risk of a cloudy CA finish (assuming you use a CA finish)?
Interesting point. I don't use Micro Mesh on wooden blanks; usually I don't go higher than 600 to 800 grit on a wooden blank unless it's something oily that doesn't like a finish on it. In that case I have grits in the 1000 - 2500 range that I use.

Speaking of grits, is anybody else hungry? :biggrin::biggrin:
 

Woodchipper

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Thanks but just had waffles for breakfast. My wife likes grit with sugar and a bit of milk.
Back to topic- I have never thought to guess the RPMs for MM. I have turned the headstock manually while sanding and using the MM.
 

Chief TomaToe

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I mm at my last turning speed, using a very light touch, and only for a couple of passes before moving on to the next pad. I dry mm wood and wet mm acrylics, aluminite,etc. Question for those who wet mm all the time: does that not introduce moisture to a wood blank, thereby increasing the risk of a cloudy CA finish (assuming you use a CA finish)?
I use a CA finish but I have never had this problem, and I wet sand with MM on everything. I think the key is after I sand the excess CA off the barrel ends, I'll douse a small piece of paper towel with thin CA and rub the barrel ends on the CA soaked paper towel. This ensures you can get your MM pads nice and wet without the excess water soaking into the wood.
 

jttheclockman

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I mm at my last turning speed, using a very light touch, and only for a couple of passes before moving on to the next pad. I dry mm wood and wet mm acrylics, aluminite,etc. Question for those who wet mm all the time: does that not introduce moisture to a wood blank, thereby increasing the risk of a cloudy CA finish (assuming you use a CA finish)?
Not for me. You are polishing the CA finish. Have to make sure to seal the ends. That is the key. We are not talking drowning the blank either. I just keep the pads in water and take out for use.
 

BURLMAN

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I mm at my last turning speed, using a very light touch, and only for a couple of passes before moving on to the next pad. I dry mm wood and wet mm acrylics, aluminite,etc. Question for those who wet mm all the time: does that not introduce moisture to a wood blank, thereby increasing the risk of a cloudy CA finish (assuming you use a CA finish)?
Not for me. You are polishing the CA finish. Have to make sure to seal the ends. That is the key. We are not talking drowning the blank either. I just keep the pads in water and take out for use.
Ah, I see. You wet MM after you've applied the CA finish. I do the same. Before applying the finish I dry MM through 12,000 and then clean with acetone. Maybe a little overkill, but I use it as a selling point.
 
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jttheclockman

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I mm at my last turning speed, using a very light touch, and only for a couple of passes before moving on to the next pad. I dry mm wood and wet mm acrylics, aluminite,etc. Question for those who wet mm all the time: does that not introduce moisture to a wood blank, thereby increasing the risk of a cloudy CA finish (assuming you use a CA finish)?
Not for me. You are polishing the CA finish. Have to make sure to seal the ends. That is the key. We are not talking drowning the blank either. I just keep the pads in water and take out for use.
What about if you are turning a cross cut blank? Would not the water seep in just as CA does on the ends of a straight grained blank?

Why would it?? You are sealing the ends and you have the entire blank covered in CA. You are polishing the CA, not the wood. You are sealing the ends with CA. I like to do the CA finish and then after I sanded to what ever grit just before MM I dip ends of tube in drop of CA I put on piece of wax paper. I do this also if I use automotive sand paper before the MM Because I wet sand with that paper too. I never had one blank cloudy up on me since I have been doing this. Call me lucky or what but my answer would be no to your question.
 

jttheclockman

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I mm at my last turning speed, using a very light touch, and only for a couple of passes before moving on to the next pad. I dry mm wood and wet mm acrylics, aluminite,etc. Question for those who wet mm all the time: does that not introduce moisture to a wood blank, thereby increasing the risk of a cloudy CA finish (assuming you use a CA finish)?
Not for me. You are polishing the CA finish. Have to make sure to seal the ends. That is the key. We are not talking drowning the blank either. I just keep the pads in water and take out for use.
Ah, I see. You wet MM after you've applied the CA finish. I do the same. Before applying the finish I dry MM through 12,000 and then clean with acetone. Maybe a little overkill, but I use it as a selling point.

OK I see you edited as I was typing. Yes that is what I do. I do have to say that is overkill and extra work that is not needed before you apply CA. I sand to 600 grit and stop on woods if I sand at all. Many times right from skew to finish. This is just my opinion.:):)
 

BURLMAN

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We’ve strayed a bit off topic here. Concede your point about stopping at 600 grit for a CA finish. For wood 7mm pens I always apply a friction polish (Pens Plus for example). When doing those I think it necessary to dry mm to 12000 before applying the polish.As an aside, I’ve started using Odie’s Oil as a friction polish. My results on that are subjects for another thread.
 

jttheclockman

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We’ve strayed a bit off topic here. Concede your point about stopping at 600 grit for a CA finish. For wood 7mm pens I always apply a friction polish (Pens Plus for example). When doing those I think it necessary to dry mm to 12000 before applying the polish.As an aside, I’ve started using Odie’s Oil as a friction polish. My results on that are subjects for another thread.
I will concede to your friction polish thing. I never done one. :):)
 

brailsmt

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Dec 6, 2018
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Kansas City, MO, USA
I use the same speed I sand with up until 4000. That's about 300-600. Once I hit 6000 and above I figure it is more polishing than anything, so I bump up the speed to max rpm, about 1400 for my current belt position.
 
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