Rhinoplastic versus Inlace Acrylester

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magpens

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Feb 2, 2011
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Wondering about the distinguishing characteristics of Rhinoplastic and Inlace Acrylester.

I have used both of these successfully but don't remember anything particularly distinguishing other than that both are very hard and require care in turning ... both prone to chipping particularly in the early stages of turning a square cross-section to round. . After that, with light cuts, both produce nice pens fairly readily.

They both polish up beautifully, resulting in gorgeous pens.

I know that the world of "plastics" is vast, and I know virtually nothing about the varieties of materials that get lumped under this term.

Would appreciate comments comparing and contrasting these two materials, please.
 
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penicillin

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Feb 27, 2019
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Wondering about the distinguishing characteristics of Rhinoplastic and Inlace Acrylester.

I have used both of these successfully but don't remember anything particularly distinguishing other than that both are very hard and require care in turning ... both prone to chipping particularly in the early stages of turning a square cross-section to round. . After that, with light cuts, both produce nice pens fairly readily.

They both polish up beautifully, resulting in gorgeous pens.

I know that the world of "plastics" is vast, and I know virtually nothing about the varieties of materials that get lumped under this term.

Would appreciate comments comparing and contrasting these two materials, please.
I have not tried Rhinoplastic, but I have tried Inlace Acrylester. I wonder whether turning cinder block would be much different. At least it finishes beautifully.

You commented about chipping while roughing the square blank to a cylinder. After the blanks are ready for turning, I take one more step. I put the blank in a clamp end-to-end. I hold the clamp and use it to press the "corner edges" of the blank against a belt sander to round or "soften" them. I also rotate them slightly as I press to make them rounder.

If you soften the corner edges of your blanks, it is much easier on your turning tools, and you are less likely to crack or damage the blank. If you try the belt sander technique that I suggested, keep the following in mind:

* Heat is bad for plastics. Keep your "touches" brief to avoid damaging the blank from heat.

* The belt sander can be messy. Inlace Acrylester is the messiest. You get an incredibly fine dust that settles on everything and does not brush off easily. After the first time, I now do the belt sanding outside. It is better than clogging my shop vac filter.

There are other techniques for softening the corner edges of your blank. Some people use a roundover bit in a router table to round the blank to a cylinder quickly.
 
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1080Wayne

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Feb 5, 2006
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Brownfield, Alberta, Canada.
Haven`t tried Rhinoplastic either , but am at the point where I automatically round all plastic and cross cut wood on 80 grit disc sander , with 1 micron filter in attached shop vac . Doesn`t catch all of the dust , depending on how much of the disc is being used , so usually have good dust mask as well .
 

MRDucks2

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Jul 17, 2017
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Franklin, IN
I have turned both and find them pretty similar. I know WoodTurningz just north of Indy owns the Inlace Acrylester formula/brand/what ever you call it. Reading somewhere, it was described as being an over catalyzed PR. Similar description for Rhino Plastic.

We tried an experiment in my shop varying the ME in PR by 4x for the same amount of resin and after turning, found very little difference in the final product. So, didn’t come across any secrets there, other than the obvious difference in cure times.


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Wagner11

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Jul 8, 2017
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Indiana
They are both polyester resin. I find rhinoplastic to be easier to turn than inlace but I don't actually have difficulty with either one.

It makes sense that inlace would be over catalyzed as that apparently makes the rain more brittle. I've not seen that happen myself but I've heard people say it does.

They do both polish beautifully.

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