Polishing Compounds

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BryanMurphy

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Joined
Jun 15, 2020
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33
Location
Michigan, US
I was wondering what you all use to polish pens. Specifically things like Ebonite, diamondcast or resins.

For wood I am using Tripoli, White Diamond, and Carnuba Wax.
 
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carlmorrell

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Joined
May 14, 2013
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570
Location
Cary, NC
Forever, I used micro-mesh then Maguires Scratch-X. Regardless of CA finish over wood, plastics, or ebonite. (I have made quite a bit of ebonite). Sometimes, when I make a mistake, usually not sanding parallel to the body, I get all done and see scratches, more visible on dark surfaces. Last summer, I decided to get the 3-wheel buffing system from Penn-state, and have to admit it, but it seems to make everything pop a little more. So I think you are already on the right track!

Two observations I can not stress enough. Wet sanding will hide scratches. Make sure you dry off to see if there are any scratches before progressing finer. Second, I ALWAYS have on extra magnification. I love my Donegan glass visors. My opinion there is, if I can get the scratches out with magnification, they will not be seen without the magnifiers.
 

rixstix

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Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
169
Location
Canistota, SD USA.
From my picture framing days, polishing acrylic was always done using Novus 3-2-1 products; so that is what I use by old habit on acrylic and other resins. Never looked for anything better or easier.
 
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
609
Location
Fuquay Varina, NC
I did a few variations of the same thing for 10+ years... Then a friend of mine gave me a set of "Magic Juice" polishing liquids to try and it was a game changer.

In the past I'd wet sand with 800,1200,2000 work by way through the 6 or so grits of 3M polishing paper (You know it as Zona possibly) then use two different 3M polishing compounds. It worked but it was certainly a lot to go through.

After trying Magic Juice from Stadium blanks I'm hooked. I still do my 800,1200,2000 but then I just go through the 6 grits of the liquid abrasive using a microfiber towel with my blank on the lathe and it looks as good or better as anything I've taken to a buffer. Once I found out what he's rebottling it made a lot more sense. It's basically one of the best liquid abrasive products on the planet that runs $180 per "grit" in the full bottle form. Thankfully a little goes a long way and him rebottling it makes it a lot more approachable than having to spend $1k+ on a good liquid abrasive system.
 

henry1164

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Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
193
Location
Webster, NY
This only works when you have the blank turned/tooled to a smooth finish with no tool marks (i.e. use skew as final tool), no depressions, scratches, etc. and you can start sanding at 400 grit. With wood I sand to 1000 grit, clean with DNA (and let fully dry) followed by CA - most times I use thin only and about 8-9 coats. After CA has fully cured I sand from 600 grit to about 1500 grit. Then I use Dr. Kirk's Red/White/Blue at a high speed - about 2500. I know when it's working as I get some heat through the paper towel. With acrylic I sand to 2000 grit then use Dr. Kirk's as above. After Dr. Kirk's and keeping the speed the same I apply Meguair's PlastX also looking for the heat. Not having to use micro-mesh is a time saver, eliminates the need for water and gives an excellent result.
 

peytonstreet

Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2019
Messages
7
Location
Santa Cruz, CA
I did a few variations of the same thing for 10+ years... Then a friend of mine gave me a set of "Magic Juice" polishing liquids to try and it was a game changer.

In the past I'd wet sand with 800,1200,2000 work by way through the 6 or so grits of 3M polishing paper (You know it as Zona possibly) then use two different 3M polishing compounds. It worked but it was certainly a lot to go through.

After trying Magic Juice from Stadium blanks I'm hooked. I still do my 800,1200,2000 but then I just go through the 6 grits of the liquid abrasive using a microfiber towel with my blank on the lathe and it looks as good or better as anything I've taken to a buffer. Once I found out what he's rebottling it made a lot more sense. It's basically one of the best liquid abrasive products on the planet that runs $180 per "grit" in the full bottle form. Thankfully a little goes a long way and him rebottling it makes it a lot more approachable than having to spend $1k+ on a good liquid abrasive system.
Here here on the Magic Juice! I go thru the Abranet mesh sanding sheets up to 1,000 grit, then switch and polish with the 6 grades of Magic Juice. I don't even have to buff as the last grade of Magic Juice does better than Caswell fine and extra-fine compounds.
 
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