Peachtree Woodworking Buffing System, aka Beall 3 in 1

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EdM

Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2018
Messages
89
Location
Long Island, N.Y., ETA Southeast Florida !
I recently purchased the Beall buffing system repackaged for Peachtree Woodworking, and hope to install it today.
I've read a few reviews that indicate that the MT2 end of the one piece allthread rod, which is lightly threaded on this kit for some reason, may damage the headstock's MT2 receiver.
Has anyone here had, or heard of, any issues with this ?
Is there an alternate method to drive the wheels ?
I certainly l don't want to damage my lathe !

Thanks !
EdM
 
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rsieracki

Active Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Messages
124
Location
Illinois
the genuine Beall is great and well made... the knock off that PSI and others sell is allthread that will ruin a MT2 taper
 

Lucky2

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Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
788
Location
New Brunswick/ Canada
The above statement is rather strong and improper. Yes, the P.S.I.knock buffing system "can" ruin your MT2 taper, it does not necessarily mean that all of them do so. It's a case of buyer beware, and of how much of a risk you might be willing to take to save a few bucks.

Len
 

mmayo

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Joined
Jan 12, 2013
Messages
1,087
Location
Tehachapi, CA
I am fortunate to have selected the Beale and it did not damage the headstock. Any MT2 left in place for a long time may cause issues as the metals are not exactly the same. Mine lives on an older mini lathe, but I clean to hole in the headstock and wipe the Beale MT2 with a light oil every few months. I’m happy and buff every pen, seam ripper, bottle stopper and razor on it.
 

Edward Cypher

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Joined
Feb 8, 2011
Messages
1,892
Location
Denver, Colorado
I think it is a Ron Brown Knock off

If it is the one I bought from Peachtree it is made by Ron Brown in China somewhere and the all thread MT 2 was very roughly machined and I could see how it could really mess up your MT2 on the headstock side. I also have beall's and they are not anywhere near the same except in name.
I took my peachtree one to a machine shop and they were able to smooth out the all thread and it is fine and does work like the Beall now.


Thanks for the replies...
I believe that what I've received is a genuine Beall system, repackaged by Peachtree Woodworking for resale....
I will certainly check with them before proceeding....

EdM
 

moke

Active Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2009
Messages
916
Location
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
I have a Beall and have had for 6 or 7 years now. It also has it's own mini lathe. I have not used MM since then. It is much quicker than MM, but gives a great polish easily, and you have to be careful to get all the deep scratches out before "calling it done".

Do not buff with the bushings still on the mandrel, any metal can darken the wheels. That darkness can be transferred to some materials. I have several old mandrels with delrin bushings, that I use for "finishing". I buff, then put it back on my regular lathe and use plastic polish and finally some Ren wax....being careful to not take off all the wax I just put on.

Also some of the acrylic blanks have what I can only describe as the winding string pattern. https://www.pennstateind.com/store/WXLB9926.html
Buffing raises that pattern slightly, so you can see it. It can look like scratches, but if you look closely, it is actually that pattern. I have found that minimal buffing of those, works best. I sand those to 1200, even 2000 sometimes, then quickly buff to shine. Otherwise I go from 600 to buffing.

That is probably more than you needed to know, just be aware there is a slight learning curve. I have tried other buffs on the Beall, always returning to the Beall ones. Also be aware that new buffs will cover you in little strings, until the get worn in. I have found this to be "normal".
 
Last edited:

RVA_Tyndall

Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2019
Messages
93
I have a Beall and have had for 6 or 7 years now. It also has it's own mini lathe. I have not used MM since then. It is much quicker than MM, but gives a great polish easily, and you have to be careful to get all the deep scratches out before "calling it done".



Do not buff with the bushings still on the mandrel, any metal can darken the wheels. That darkness can be transferred to some materials. I have several old mandrels with delrin bushings, that I use for "finishing". I buff, then put it back on my regular lathe and use plastic polish and finally some Ren wax....being careful to not take off all the wax I just put on.



Also some of the acrylic blanks have what I can only describe as the winding string pattern. https://www.pennstateind.com/store/WXLB9926.html

Buffing raises that pattern slightly, so you can see it. It can look like scratches, but if you look closely, it is actually that pattern. I have found that minimal buffing of those, works best. I sand those to 1200, even 2000 sometimes, then quickly buff to shine. Otherwise I go from 600 to buffing.



That is probably more than you needed to know, just be aware there is a slight learning curve. I have tried other buffs on the Beall, always returning to the Beall ones. Also be aware that new buffs will cover you in little strings, until the get worn in. I have found this to be "normal".


I have been buffing after using MM, but now realize that I am probably stepping backward in “grits” by doing this.


https://m.facebook.com/?_rdr#!/rvatyndall/
 
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