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john l graham

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
74
Location
Molokai, Hawaii
Greetings to all of you. Years ago I left wood turning because of chronic asthma and a move to Hawaii. Well, my asthma is gone and found not to be aggravated by wood turning. I am now in a residence that is bigger than a breadbox and has a garage.
Newly purchased Rikon tools and equipment has me back to turning pens. A plus, there are many wood species here that I like to turn. Also, axis deer antler is plentiful.
Here is my first pen off of the new Rikon lathe. CSUSA chrome cigar from Koa wood blank. CA finish.
 

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MPVic

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
405
Location
Hamilton, ON, Canada
John:
Certainly looks like you haven't forgotten a thing, your craft is beautiful. Thanks for sharing.
Just out of curiosity, what might be the most native tree species?
 

john l graham

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
74
Location
Molokai, Hawaii
John:
Certainly looks like you haven't forgotten a thing, your craft is beautiful. Thanks for sharing.
Just out of curiosity, what might be the most native tree species?
I am still learning about Hawaiian trees and wood types. The ancient royalty used Kou wood and secondly Milo wood to make their calabash bowls for food. Koa, acacia Koa, is the most known native wood. Ohio trees are also considered native and in danger of being wiped out. They are very important to the local ecosystem.
I am sure there are others but most can be found throughout the Polynesian Islands. Many were brought here from Australia as well.
 

john l graham

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
74
Location
Molokai, Hawaii
I am still learning about Hawaiian trees and wood types. The ancient royalty used Kou wood and secondly Milo wood to make their calabash bowls for food. Koa, acacia Koa, is the most known native wood. Ohio trees are also considered native and in danger of being wiped out. They are very important to the local ecosystem.
I am sure there are others but most can be found throughout the Polynesian Islands. Many were brought here from Australia as well.
Ohia not ohio.
 

Wmcullen

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
96
Location
Fairfax, Virginia
Beautiful pen and fascinating thread. Today I’ve learned about Hawaiian trees. (And had to look up what a “swagman” is.... from Peter’s post earlier.) Just another day of discovery on IAP!
 

hewunch

Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2008
Messages
4,461
Location
Albany, GA
Greetings to all of you. Years ago I left wood turning because of chronic asthma and a move to Hawaii. Well, my asthma is gone and found not to be aggravated by wood turning. I am now in a residence that is bigger than a breadbox and has a garage.
Newly purchased Rikon tools and equipment has me back to turning pens. A plus, there are many wood species here that I like to turn. Also, axis deer antler is plentiful.
Here is my first pen off of the new Rikon lathe. CSUSA chrome cigar from Koa wood blank. CA finish.
Glad to see you back. Beautiful as always
 

howsitwork

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2016
Messages
1,285
Location
Thirsk
Nice work and glad to hear your health has improved.

Now IS the time to invest in a decent filtered air helmet to keep it like that ! Would love to try out some of that timber for its magnificent grain.
 
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