I know this has been done. . .

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MDWine

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. . . and I've seen the thread, but for the life of me I cannot find it now.

I want to take my acrylic/plastic/resin/etc cutoffs and get them to smaller pieces, then cast them into blanks.
Not technically difficult, but I wonder the best way to make my cutoffs smaller?
I want the individual pieces in the 1/8" range... kinda small compared to what I have seen before.
I'm thinking start with a hammer, and maybe that's all I need?
What about an electric mixer kind of machine? Maybe that would make things too small and/or dusty?

So I am polling the IAP collective for thoughts and ideas on the topic...

(the IAP BORG... all your blanks am belong to us) lol
 
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turncrazy43

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Not done it myself, but some have used the hammer method to break the cut offs into smaller pieces and then place them into a mold with a single color resin. I've seen it done with a white resin. I suppose you could do it with any other color you want. If you have a fine tooth chop saw you could cut the cut offs into small slices and then snap them off with pliers to get smaller irregular pieces. I will wait to see what others may offer as I have lots of cut offs sitting in boxes with no place to go.
Turncrazy43
 

Gary Beasley

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If you are particular about chunk size you might want to use a screen to sift the particles then put the leftovers back through the crushing process till you get what you want. A somewhat finer screen can separate the dust from the desired size too.
 

howsitwork

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re the blender idea I suppose it depends on how fast you can run when the wife spots you ! šŸ˜‰

Should work but for consistent sizes you might want a garden sieve to run stuff through. i wouā€do use a bandsaw and accept the losses from the blade curf. Hold the pieces in a wooden clothes peg NOT your finger though and have the hpguard set really close to the pieces. If you cut a piece of hard cardboard and tape it in place half cut it will stop the segments getting drawn i to the blade orifice.
 

MDWine

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Thanks everyone for your responses. I just may have to look for a used blender on the yard sale sites and give this a "whirl"... lol
This will be a winter project, I gotta turn some 'birdie houses' for Christmas!

THANKS!!
 
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