homemade wolverine style grinding jig question...

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glycerine

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I'm making a grinding jig similar to the Wolverine. I have some ideas on how to make the base, but wanted to hear what others have done or even see some close-ups of how the actual wolverine base works.
I made my V-arm with the square tubing oriented so that the hole in the base will be diamond shaped and not square. I believe this is how the original Wolverine jig is positioned...
 
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hughbie

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i looked at others pics of their 'wolferine' jigs and came up with this with no drawings or measurements....put the grinder on top of some 3/4 plywood......and a strip of 3/4 ply about 4-5 inches away parrelle and then a sliding piece with with a v-block to hold your tools....then add a cross piece for the skew....

be inventive....you can do it!:biggrin:
 

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hughbie

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rob, i use a 6" grinder and that's what is in the picture...works fine for me. i am told and can see the reasoning....the 8" would be better, less inward curve on the grind.....suddenly, i can't remember the tech term....but my grinder is mounted on my work table.....and it doesn't take but a second to dress the edge when needed....

notice the penciled in marking on the slider piece. match the angle on each tool and draw a line so you can return the setup to each piece...i love it and besides the cost of the grinder and the handle for tightening....the rest was from scraps.
 

lorbay

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rob, i use a 6" grinder and that's what is in the picture...works fine for me. i am told and can see the reasoning....the 8" would be better, less inward curve on the grind.....suddenly, i can't remember the tech term....but my grinder is mounted on my work table.....and it doesn't take but a second to dress the edge when needed....

notice the penciled in marking on the slider piece. match the angle on each tool and draw a line so you can return the setup to each piece...i love it and besides the cost of the grinder and the handle for tightening....the rest was from scraps.
Check this out regarding 8" wheels.


  • Sharpening turning tools.






    Lin.
 

rjwolfe3

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i looked at others pics of their 'wolferine' jigs and came up with this with no drawings or measurements....put the grinder on top of some 3/4 plywood......and a strip of 3/4 ply about 4-5 inches away parrelle and then a sliding piece with with a v-block to hold your tools....then add a cross piece for the skew....

be inventive....you can do it!:biggrin:


ok I build something like this last night. I didn't have dimensions, so I winged it. Now what is the best method to sharpen the different tools? I know you use the two on the sides to do the skew but what about a bowl gouge or a round nose scraper?
 

KenV

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"And I keep wondering why I can't raise it up and put 8 inch wheels on it!?!?! motor not strong enough? "

If you have ever been around a grinding when when it comes apart -- you would know why wheel guards are included. And putting bigger wheels on will not fit inside the guards. And the surface speed at a 4 inch redius is lots larger than it is at a 3 inch radius.

See the note under Roy's signature for this idea!!!
 

glycerine

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Nope, never been around one that has come apart. This is my first grinder... I wasn't thinking about the guards not being large enough because I've already taken mine off.
 

hughbie

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here are a couple of pics on how to sharpen your gouge on this setup...or at least the way i do it.
it only takes a light touch......don't let the gouge drop into the wheel.
the butt of the handle sits in the center 'v' notch on the adjustable slide.
you set the distance till the wheel 'matches' the angle on the gouge
 

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rjwolfe3

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here are a couple of pics on how to sharpen your gouge on this setup...or at least the way i do it.
it only takes a light touch......don't let the gouge drop into the wheel.
the butt of the handle sits in the center 'v' notch on the adjustable slide.
you set the distance till the wheel 'matches' the angle on the gouge


Woot thanks, that is what I figured but I wanted to make sure. I am still trying to repair my skew from when I was sharpening it by hand, lol.
 

Lenny

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This site has a jig sort of like you are talking about. Nice sight.

http://www.aroundthewoods.com/

Yes, Darrell has been a long time contributor to rec.woodturning on usenet. He and many of the other regulars there were a great help to me a few years ago when I got back into turning. I followed the instructions on his site and made an Oland tool and it works great!
I would encourage everyone to check out his site! :)
 

bitshird

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About the only thing you can't do with a jig like that is a finger nail grind. But if you have a basic sharpening jig like these then just buy the Wolverine Varigrind accessory, it will work just fine in a home made jig.
 

gketell

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I'm making a grinding jig similar to the Wolverine. I have some ideas on how to make the base, but wanted to hear what others have done or even see some close-ups of how the actual wolverine base works.
I made my V-arm with the square tubing oriented so that the hole in the base will be diamond shaped and not square. I believe this is how the original Wolverine jig is positioned...

They have a "diamond" shaped hole for your rod welded to a rectangular shaped section where the clamp mechanism lives. There is a hole between the two rods and a v-shaped block goes between them. Then an eccentric lever lives in the rectangular rod and pushes on the v-shaped block which clamps your sliding rod into the diamond rod.

From the front:
attachment.jpg


From the back, a close up of the eccentric mechanism and clamp-block:
attachment.jpg


And the clamp-block in the diamond hole:
attachment.jpg


Have fun!
 

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glycerine

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They have a "diamond" shaped hole for your rod welded to a rectangular shaped section where the clamp mechanism lives. There is a hole between the two rods and a v-shaped block goes between them. Then an eccentric lever lives in the rectangular rod and pushes on the v-shaped block which clamps your sliding rod into the diamond rod.

Have fun!

Perfect! Thank you!!!
 

hughbie

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well, my tool isn't that big.....no comments please......
there is a video on you tube....showing a guy with this type of setup and he used the side of the wheel.....DON'T DO THAT....it's dangerous....
like was said earlier.....go side to side......very light pressure and it will come back to life...i can't sharpen freehand either....
 

Lenny

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here are a couple of pics on how to sharpen your gouge on this setup...or at least the way i do it.
it only takes a light touch......don't let the gouge drop into the wheel.
the butt of the handle sits in the center 'v' notch on the adjustable slide.
you set the distance till the wheel 'matches' the angle on the gouge
That's pretty much the setup I use as well. One thing I learned though (from one of Richard Raffin's videos) is to run the gouge forward at the end of the roll in order to better shape the edge (fingernail grind)...
ride it up the wheel so to speak.
I do need to add a similar setup for grinding my Skews.
 

glycerine

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so far...

Here's what I have so far. Just need to get someone to weld for me...
I have the regular v-arm, a skew attachment and the last pic is the beginning of an attachment for an "Ellsworth" type jig...
 

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jleiwig

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It might be worth your while to get one of those 99 buck jobbies from HF to weld it if you can't find someone to do it for you. I'm sure you could always resell it on craigslist without taking too big of a hit.
 

glycerine

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That's true, but I've never used a welder in my life. I guess the learning curve isn't that bad?
I haven't checked with any muffler shops yet either. I might try that first.
 

jleiwig

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That's true, but I've never used a welder in my life. I guess the learning curve isn't that bad?
I haven't checked with any muffler shops yet either. I might try that first.

Just like a gun. Point it where you want it to go and pull the trigger. check out youtube videos.
 

snyiper

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Go to a local welding supply house there is ususlly a board with local welders that will do small things. Or ask the guys in the shop they will toss you a few names as well. The guys welding exhaust may not get a great weld on thicker pieces.
 
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