Dental pumice as a polish?

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farmer

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Jun 16, 2012
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I have tried tooth paste ,, I buy polishing creams ,but prefer a commercial buffing machine
 

WriteON

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Aug 21, 2013
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Pumice is generally … flower of pumice, Course, medium or fine. It works well but for fine scratches. Wound Just my opinion.. the mesh pads are the best. Pumice is best used with a 3-4” rag wheel or felt cones. Pumice is messy … it’s having sand thrown at your face. You do not want it in your eyes. Googles are a must but we use them regardless. If you want to try it start with medium or fine.
 

WriteON

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Boynton Beach ,Fl. - BlueBell, Pa.
Thanks. Pondered buying some online. Seems there are better ways to polish.
What are you polishing? I watched a few utubes… people using pumice on furniture. It must be good but I’m not a fan for a lot of reasons. I used pumice on acrylic dental appliances using a Baldor lathe with buffing wheels. It was a wet application. Water&pumice. On the utube the craftsman is using it dry.
 
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Jans husband

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May 4, 2020
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Doncaster England
Pumice is generally … flower of pumice, Course, medium or fine. It works well but for fine scratches. Wound Just my opinion.. the mesh pads are the best. Pumice is best used with a 3-4” rag wheel or felt cones. Pumice is messy … it’s having sand thrown at your face. You do not want it in your eyes. Googles are a must but we use them regardless. If you want to try it start with medium or fine.
Seems like a lot of messing around to me, especially when good old Yorkshire grit is available, and does an excellent job in finishing and polishing wood and acrylic

Mike
 

Pierre---

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Jun 10, 2012
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France
I did, for French polish. When the wood is open-pored, you first rub a mix of pumice and shellac (and alcohol for a better penetration) to fill the pores. In the same time, pumice sand the wood to the last shine. We have a very thin grain cald ponce-soie, silk pumice, for that. The pumice takes the color of the wood when rubbing it ; it fills the pores, the shellac glues it in. Then, it is possible to lay the first shellac layer on a good base, and the pumice scratches won't show. I think it is quite specific for French polish.
 
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