Dead dogwood tree

Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad

Woodchipper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,395
Location
Cleveland, TN
I have a dead dogwood tree in my backyard that needs to come down. Not sure how it died- one day it was OK and then, leaves didn't come out and part of the bark (no puns here, OK?) is coming off. I'm thinking lightning kill but there are trees around it that are over 75 feet tall and they are OK. There is one tree that has a broken branch just hanging- maybe lightning and then to the dogwood?
Would it be salvageable for blanks or other turning? When I cut it, what should I look for in the wood or grain? It is about 16 inches in diameter at the ground. Thanks. Hate to turn into firewood.
 
Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad

mark james

IAP Collection, Curator
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
7,907
Location
Medina, Ohio
I have a dead dogwood tree in my backyard that needs to come down. Not sure how it died- one day it was OK and then, leaves didn't come out and part of the bark (no puns here, OK?) is coming off. I'm thinking lightning kill but there are trees around it that are over 75 feet tall and they are OK. There is one tree that has a broken branch just hanging- maybe lightning and then to the dogwood?
Would it be salvageable for blanks or other turning? When I cut it, what should I look for in the wood or grain? It is about 16 inches in diameter at the ground. Thanks. Hate to turn into firewood.
I would certainly try to harvest some bowl blanks and sections for future pen blanks. Cut; anchorseal (or other end grain sealers); put away to dry; patience... Nothing lost but some effort.

Have fun.
 

KenV

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
4,722
Location
Juneau, Alaska.
Dogwood can be a very desirable wood for its ability to take and hold fine detail. In days of yore, it was used to make bobbins and shuttles for weaving mills. It is finer grain than maple and very hard. Makes great mallets, tool handles.

The pieces I have are bla for color and fancy grain. It accepts inks and dye well.

Look to the butt of the tree and the root ball for " root burl"

While not exciting for pens, makes nice ornaments, turned spoons and ladles (see Raffin book more turning projects).

Nice wood to work with.
 

KenV

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
4,722
Location
Juneau, Alaska.
Do you have powder post beedles in your area???

If so, storing off the ground reduces risk of infestation. Bringing infested wood into the shop is risky..... Having beetles in the house framing is not good.
 

Woodchipper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,395
Location
Cleveland, TN
Store outside in a storage building, off the floor. Will watch for undesirable critters. Not sure of powder post beetles but my son had some in hardwood flooring...imported. Would find tiny holes with fine wood dust around them, if that is what you are talking about.
 

KenV

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
4,722
Location
Juneau, Alaska.
Yup!!! The holes and the "dust" is sign of adults leaving and ready to lay eggs for the next generation.

There are a couple of borate treatments that can be used.
 
Top Bottom