Contest for the Turning Challenged Voting

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Please choose 3 entries

  • Entry 1

    Votes: 27 35.1%
  • Entry 2

    Votes: 17 22.1%
  • Entry 3

    Votes: 9 11.7%
  • Entry 4

    Votes: 24 31.2%
  • Entry 5

    Votes: 28 36.4%
  • Entry 6

    Votes: 42 54.5%
  • Entry 7

    Votes: 16 20.8%
  • Entry 8

    Votes: 35 45.5%

  • Total voters
    77
  • Poll closed .

D.Oliver

Member
Joined
May 10, 2011
Messages
3,531
Location
Faith SD
For this contest there will be only one round of voting. Please choose your top three pens.


Entry 1

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Spalted Hackberry




Entry 2

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Slimline Funline in economy gold finish, with American Walnut and a Malachite stone inlay.




Entry 3

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This pen is a gift to the wife. Slimline pens do not fit her hand and fatlines are to bulky so this pen is somewhere in between. It was sanded and burnished and then paste wax was used for the final coat.
The best part is that she says "It fits my hand."




Entry 4


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This is a Legacy Slimline Pen kit. The wood is cocobolo. I like the color and grain that this wood provides.




Entry 5

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Blank is Cocobolo (I still have scars from the rash it gave me) turned at max speed using the large skew. Sanded to 400 and hit with Myland's Friction Polish.




Entry 6

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It's a Dymondwood blank from Berea that was ripped, rotated and glued back up with a piece of Padauk to break up the uniform pattern of the blank. Finished with Mylands friction polish




Entry 7

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The blank was buckeye burl, and the kit is a gunmetal slimline pencil kit.




Entry 8

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I bought the buckeye burl blanks from IAP member rockb. As soon as I received them, I figured out that I wouldn't be able to use them for pen turning because they're too lightweight and porous. So what do I do? Build a vacuum chamber and enter the field of wood stabilization of course. This is my first pen that I have turned using starting with the stabilization process. Chrome slimline funline pen kit. Pens plus friction polish finish. Left it matte.
 
Last edited:
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Ed McDonnell

Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2008
Messages
2,293
Location
Melbourne, FL
Hey Derek - These pens deserve a lot more votes. Maybe you need to offer up some instructions for the IAP members who might be voting challenged....If only you had promoted this contest a little bit.....


Ed
 

D.Oliver

Member
Joined
May 10, 2011
Messages
3,531
Location
Faith SD
Hey Derek - These pens deserve a lot more votes. Maybe you need to offer up some instructions for the IAP members who might be voting challenged....

Ed

That's a good idea.......

INSTUCTIONS FOR THE VOTING CHALLENGED.

STEP ONE - CLICKY THE LITTLE BOXES.
 

skiprat

Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Messages
7,536
Location
In a Skip in Wales
A great bunch of entries.....none of which look like they were turned by someone that was 'Turning Challenged'...
Well done all who entered.:biggrin:
 

mecompco

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2015
Messages
1,607
Location
Fairfield, Maine
Thanks for the votes and the third place win! (#5). My very first pen turned completely on the wood lathe. Got a little over enthusiastic with the skew so the nib is a little proud. I'm slowly getting the hang of the skew (and getting it sharp), but it is a totally different experience than turning with the metal lathe (I can easily make a perfect slimline on that).

Regards,
Michael
 

Skie_M

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2015
Messages
2,738
Location
Lawton, Ok
Thanks for the votes and the third place win! (#5). My very first pen turned completely on the wood lathe. Got a little over enthusiastic with the skew so the nib is a little proud. I'm slowly getting the hang of the skew (and getting it sharp), but it is a totally different experience than turning with the metal lathe (I can easily make a perfect slimline on that).

Regards,
Michael
When you sharpen your skew, make sure you also polish that bevel really well. This helps the skew leave a finished surface behind as you work.

The larger the skew, the bigger the "sweet spot" on it.

You only need a straight edge on the skew if you plan to use it as a straight edge scraper ... a slightly rounded edge works great! :)



Congrats on the wins, guys ... I guess I gave myself away with the real stone inlay work on mine! :)
 
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