Coffee and Paprika Inlay

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Wmcullen

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
162
Location
Fairfax, Virginia
I’m not sure if this process is right or wrong; unique or common. But it works for me and I want to share in case it's interesting.​
22: Coffee and Paprika Inlay
Inlay Station

last post: 21- Coffee Ground Spiral
post22.06.jpg
Using a router to dig trenches I've been making pens inlaid with materials like coffee and paprika.​
The Problem
My process involved CA glue and got sloppy. It needed some organization.

Solution
(Not rocket surgery, just how I did it.)
I constructed a “station” along with some simple tools.
post22.08.jpg

post22.07.jpg

Inlay Station

The wood blanks were held on 0.25" bolts. Since I make a few at a time, there is also a drying area.
post22.11.jpg

A few simple tools for pouring and packing powder material streamlined the process.
post22.10.jpg


Coffee "recipe"
I scooped used coffee grounds into a pyrex dish and microwaved for 20-30 seconds.
Poured out liquid, stirred and let dry.
Every few hours after that the dish was microwaved for 20-30 seconds and stirred.
Repeated until grounds were completely dry.
Paprika
Bought a big container at the Dollar Store.

Inlay Process
post22.09.jpg

Working in small sections, I put thin CA into the trench.
Poured coffee or paprika using funnels and tools.
Worked at a deliberate, but not rushed, pace.
Covered with more thin CA glue and packed down.
Repeated until the trench was filled and let dry.
Turned roughly to see how the material looked.
If I saw "caverns" the above steps were repeated.

Masking Tape
For this pen I used both coffee and paprika. Masking tape covered areas not being worked on.
Also, a little masking tape on the "spatula" end of this little tool made it somewhat reusable.
post22.12.jpg

Whereas these little packing tools were basically disposable.
post22.14.jpg


Summary
I appreciate everyone who has written about these versatile and thrifty inlay materials including Curly and robutacion.
It can be a messy process, but with some time the results can be satisfying.
post22.06.jpg


3D Model
I'm attaching the 3D model for anyone who has the ability and interest to print it.
I tried to be efficient with space so that everything prints within a small footprint.
The file is called InlayBox.zip which contains an .obj file
post22.15.jpg

Thanks for looking.
Cullen
 

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magpens

Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2011
Messages
14,570
Location
Coquitlam, BC, Canada
@Wmcullen

I greatly admire your ingenuity !!!! . The results are very cool !!!

I'd be interested, please, in seeing the jig you use to hold your blank while routing .... particularly interested in the angled router cuts.
 

Wmcullen

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
162
Location
Fairfax, Virginia
I'd be interested, please, in seeing the jig you use to hold your blank while routing .... particularly interested in the angled router cuts.
Thanks for the note and question, Mal.
I used a custom twist jig which works like this:
To make this particular design I raised and lowered the blank onto the router at somewhat random distances.
 

mark james

IAP Collection, Curator
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
10,832
Location
Medina, Ohio
Great innovations again Cullen. I really like the detail you put into your jigs - a real asset to the IAP membership.

Only question and it is VERY important... Plain Paprika or Smoked Paprika (I typically favor Smoked Paprika). 🤣 🤣
 

MPVic

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
424
Location
Hamilton, ON, Canada
You kill me, Cullen with your outstanding ingenuity and creativeness - those 3D printed "jig works" are so very, very, clever. I so enjoy you sharing your work.
P.S. how's rehab going?
 
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