Chainsaw mill upgrades...!

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robutacion

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I peoples,

A long time ago I purchased a clone chainsaw of the Stihl 070 with a 36" bar and skip chains, I did also order a 44" GB chainsaw mill frame and put a mill together to slab some large logs I already had in the storage paddock New GB mil & 105cc chainsaw 004_(1).jpg. At the time I slabbed with the help of my wife Merissa some logs including the last tree Merissa helped to cut and dismantle/slab (silky-Oak), 100_5031_3.jpgsince them and due to the weight of the whole thing, I removed the chainsaw out of the mill frame so that I could use the chainsaw for any bigger logs when necessary.

These chainsaws by themselves are extremely heavy so I avoided its use as much as I could and has been a few years since I last used it but I keep thinking about some of the big logs that I had in the paddock, some have been there for about 13 years (Macrocarpa or Golden Cypress) and have started to rot where they contact the moist soil/sand so, I needed to do something about it.

My 36" bar on the chainsaw mill does only give me about 28" of cut and the logs a log bigger than that so, I saw no option than invest in a 44" proper bar and 3x 44" skip chains and that cost a bundle. I did also look for a system to run the chainsaw mill where I didn't have to change the mill settings nor have to remove and re-install the whole set-up over the guides on the log itself and it happens that I saw a bloke on Youtube using a chainsaw mill with a pallet shelving type frame and that was exactly what I was looking for.

I knew that I would have to do a few modifications to get it how I wanted so and after I found some medium duty shelving frame (the heavy-duty ones are 3 times the price...!) I proceeded to work on it until I thought that would work OK or at least a lot easier than the normal chainsaw milling method. It happens that the up-rights of the frame have holes every 2" so the beams move up or down in those increments.

From experience and seeing other chainsaw mills where a hand winch was used to move the whole frame and chainsaw forwards, its a constant fight to keep it cutting straight and not sideways so I created a system where a number of small wheels run on either side of the beams/runners keeping the whole thing moving forwards straight and a lot easier to work with.

Everything is now dismantled and ready to take to the storage paddock for some testing and stabbing (I mean slabbing...! :eek:), I don't envisage any major issues with it but I'm not sure. One of the concerns I had was on how to move the chainsaw mill down or up with only 2 people, what I mean is, the same system that needs to be used to put the chainsaw mill in position for the first cut, the 2 beams or runners as I call them will need to come down on both sides 2" or 4" increments so, one of the frames (up-rights) has to be momentarily removed before the chainsaw mill can be positioned for the next cut and while it may look difficult and a pain to do, there is indeed a very simple system that will allow me to do that all by myself if I have too but obviously easier with 2 people, It would be difficult to explain here what I mean and how I intend to do it, it worked in my testings so, fingers crossed. When I have the whole thing operating I will take further pics of the steps I just mentioned, it will be a lot easier to see with the pics.

The frame is 2 meters tall x 80cm wide, the beans or runners are 3 meters long, the longest they have for these type shelves rated at 270kg per shelve. If I wanted to go longer I would need to go with the very heavy duty ones normally orange and blue in colour, weight and price is a problem, putting the chainsaw mill at the middle of the runner's length, the beams sag approx. 1/8" and this in due not only to the weight of the chainsaw, bar, chain, mill frame, which, wheels metal frame and a big solid steel 2"1/2 rod piece that I had to use as a counterbalance to the chainsaw head otherwise and the chainsaw is pushed forwards the bar would be lifting from the runner, that rod is a good 15kg.

I'm not sure when I get started, the weather here is getting a bit rainy and the Winter is coming, I know I would need lots of help getting the slabs out and on the trailer and then getting them out at home, I'm considering a 3 thrid person, a neighbour that seems to be interested in making a big outside table so, the wood will be free in exchange for his help. I myself have a few projects where I will need some 4" slabs (short ones) but none of the logs I have to mill are over 2.8 meters and that is exactly how much I can mill with this system/frame.

I leave you with some pics of the new stet-up just before I dismantled it.

Cheers
George
 

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howsitwork

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George

Nice project and good photos . Might I suggest either bottle jacks ( probably not big enough for the lift but with wood extensions they could help with take the weight) as you adjust the end height .
Or possibly the sort of side jack they use on off road vehicles over there, commonly known as high lift jacks over here


bloody hell thats a long link but it shows the type I mean. Ok it’s an extra cost but it might make th8ngs a lot safer if it’s supported whilst you make adjustments.

If I was a bit closer I’d be over like a shot to help but the airlines are a bit quite at the moment for some reason and although a cruise would be nice again it might take a while.

Stay safe mate

Ian
 

robutacion

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Ps bit concerned to read you’ve “been testing and stabbing” in paragraph 7 but as I can’t spell” things” on this ipad I can’t boast 🤣🤣🤣
Don't be worried about the "stabbing" in paragraph 7 (now corrected), a "slab" with a "t" (tea) would give me a belly acne...!☕

As for your suggestions, thank you but that would be an overkill, there are 2 things to consider when using such a frame, the number one and the most difficult is to put the chainsaw mill frame on both runners, let's say the log is 36" tall the chainsaw mill frame has to be positioned just below that hight for the first cut so the up-right frame has to be removed on the starter side but then the 2 runners would fall down so to avoid that and considering that the whole pallet shelving frame has been put together, that starter side (opposite side to where the pulley is) I will remedy that by using an adjustable U leg (upside down) where the vertical legs are made with the same tent type poles and adjusters so simply put the U frame underneath of both runners about 1' 1/2 from the up-right frame and adjust the hight to make it hold the runners I then can removed the up-right frame and slide the chainsaw mill frame in the runners after that I only have to re-install the up-right frame lock it into position and remove the U frame out.

I should say that I uninstalled the whole system before I had made that U type frame that I'm getting done soon so that I could show what I mean but I also used a black and red markers to starting from the bottom of the up-right frames (both ends) and mark in inches from the first bottom hole at 2" black the next hole up is 4" in red then 6" in black and so forwards, this will make things a lot easier when working out at what height to instal the runners to start with, making sure they are all at the same height.

The second thing to consider is adjusting down the runners after the first and each cut and that is the easiest part because I only need to leave the chainsaw mill at the end of the cut, remove the slab and then go on the starting position and with all the weight at the other end, the runners are easy to move down 1 or 2 holes (2" or 4") on one side, do the same on the other side, slide the chainsaw mill to the starting side and repeat the same process on that end, not only the runners are both adjusted down for the next cut but also the chainsaw mill is already at the starting position for the next cut, after that is simply repeat the process until the log is slabbed.

The other issue is the fact that the chainsaw mill frame will touch the ground about 8" from where the bar is so, I wouldn't be able to go down into the log without elevating the log up at least 10" and for that, I have 2 x 12" logs about 3' long where I cut a "V" grove on the first 1/3 of the love and then slope/cut the other 2/3 as a ramp, that will be positioned under the log before the whole frame is put together over the log, a lot easier that way.

I could use all the help I can get, I would be happy to just show how things should work and then step back and continue to make sure everything is OK and or adjust if necessary. I have also a 12V to 240V converter with a long cable to sharpen the chain in place when necessary.
I have 2 long logs about 9' long x 35" wide, 1 x same width but half as long and 3 butt/root logs the biggest is about 6' long x 45" diameter this one I have to take a slice to fit in the chainsaw mill at max. 37" cut and 2 slightly shorter and not as round but they are also from the tree butt/root so they have lots of curl and grain, one of these shorter slabs (need at least 27" long) will be to make a PCP gun stock that I have been waiting to do for a couple of years.

At this point, I have no other use for this whole chainsaw mill set-up but I'm not too worried about, I may advertise on the local Facebook site some chainsaw milling work for logs that will fit on my set-up, I would be also happy to rent the whole set-up to someone that has some logs to mill and recover some of my investment that way, the whole thing would have cost me about AU$2,200

Just the 44" bar cost me https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/GB-Extr...hash=item1eff5ec67c:m:mCLFFtm-BlQNi257iG2dzBQ

Cheers
George
 

howsitwork

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Oh boy that’s some bar cost but titanium I like that for style and longevity . Appreciate you taking the time t9 reply and explain your logic. Just trying to make useful suggestions as that’s what the site is for ( in my view ).

I like the way you’ve thought it about and installed coolant/ lubrication for the blade .

I thought I was thd only one on here with a PCP as most of our American cousins use something a fair bit more powerful. We are limited to 12ft/lb overs here. Whats the australian limit like? Oh my PCP is a weinrauch 100 thumbhole stock full length if you’re interested. Beautiful to use and clinically accurate ( at least in some hands ). I can get 10 shots 0.177 into a 10mm diameter when prone but in my defence that’s unbraced just hand held. If get round to installing the bipod it might improve things a bit.
 

robutacion

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Messages
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Australia - SA Adelaide Hills
Oh boy that’s some bar cost but titanium I like that for style and longevity . Appreciate you taking the time t9 reply and explain your logic. Just trying to make useful suggestions as that’s what the site is for ( in my view ).

I like the way you’ve thought it about and installed coolant/ lubrication for the blade .

I thought I was thd only one on here with a PCP as most of our American cousins use something a fair bit more powerful. We are limited to 12ft/lb overs here. Whats the australian limit like? Oh my PCP is a weinrauch 100 thumbhole stock full length if you’re interested. Beautiful to use and clinically accurate ( at least in some hands ). I can get 10 shots 0.177 into a 10mm diameter when prone but in my defence that’s unbraced just hand held. If get round to installing the bipod it might improve things a bit.
Yes, we are here to share and much more...!

PCP's are not as commonly used here in Australia compared to the UK and even USA and to be quite honest I don't know if we have any laws on the ft/lb limit, not that I have to worry too much about it with mine, its a .177 CO2 Hammerly 850 magnum that I converted to PCP as the CO2 is useless in warm to hot days but still fairly quiet/silent which I need for my yard plinking.

Rifle such as yours are well known for being reliable and very accurate.

Cheers
George
 

howsitwork

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Location
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Yes, we are here to share and much more...!

PCP's are not as commonly used here in Australia compared to the UK and even USA and to be quite honest I don't know if we have any laws on the ft/lb limit, not that I have to worry too much about it with mine, its a .177 CO2 Hammerly 850 magnum that I converted to PCP as the CO2 is useless in warm to hot days but still fairly quiet/silent which I need for my yard plinking.

Rifle such as yours are well known for being reliable and very accurate.

Cheers
George
Yes it’s definitely the “boy “ behind the trigger that generates the inaccuracy
 

robutacion

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Location
Australia - SA Adelaide Hills
Yes it’s definitely the “boy “ behind the trigger that generates the inaccuracy
No, it ain't nothing to do with accuracy, in fact, these Hammerli's are well known for having some of the most accurate barrels out there, the problem is the average fps on CO2's is about 600 or just under there is on .177 cal however when the temps get other the pressure inside the CO2 cartridge get's higher and the hammer spring does not have enough tension to push the valve release "pin" is so no shot. Increasing the hammer spring alone doesn't help much as these have no regulator so, with a stronger spring the impact on the valve pin and the pressure inside the valve aver very uniform/irregular so it becomes very inaccurate, obviously.

On mine, I installed a side leaver, modified the hammer and put a longer and stronger spring and done some work on the trigger and its adjustments unfortunately due to the heavier spring, there is not possible to make the trigger any lighter than 5lb and I would prefer 1/3 of that, unless there is some special trigger system for these models which I doubt, I have to live with a heavy trigger. I put a .480ml tank and a 800 psi regulator valve it now shoots about 800 fps which is still low, I have a 1,200 regulator valve to try on it but I'm concern I have to increase the spring tension/strength si will see, as it is it produces 62db sound going close to the velocity of sound I will creat that known "crack" (sonic boom) sound that can double the sound db's and that I don't want or the neighbours will get annoyed.

Since modified into a PCP and having a regulator, each shot is very consistent in its fps and the groups are very good, using an unusual pellet here in Australia called Piranha at 10.5g so far this is the pallet the barrel shoots the best...!

The stock is a synthetic one and I had the remove the front part of the forehand of the stock to install/fit a big bottle/cylinder so at the moment doesn't look the best so I'm going to make a thumbhole stock identical to what comes in the Walther Rotex RM8 Varmint wood stock.

Cheers
George
 
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