American black walnut long range fishing tackle box for Texas

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mmayo

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Jan 12, 2013
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Tehachapi, CA
This one took less than two months and will ship out to Texas later this week. The stainless steel tubes hold four rod/reel combinations ready to fish. The eyes on the top front are for tying hooks and pulling them tight. The various stainless steel eye straps are used to tie the box down to the tackle rack. It can get very rough out there.
 

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Woodchipper

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Mar 15, 2017
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Cleveland, TN
Beautiful but I wonder what it will look like after one fishing season. I would put it up to admire and buy a plastic tackle box.
 

mmayo

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Tehachapi, CA
Beautiful but I wonder what it will look like after one fishing season. I would put it up to admire and buy a plastic tackle box.
They look great after a decade or more of fishing seasons. This is the tackle rack on the Royal Star showing photos taken in 2016 of several boxes that I have made, all these boxes will return this year for another 8 days at sea. Some boxes are at sea for more than 20 days per year, every year. Two of the oldest were built in 2004! Mine is the lone Guanacaste wood box built in 2007 shown in the second photo. I refinished it last year to install my current hardware. They all look good with a few scratches from the tough life on a sportfishing boat with 25 fisherman and 7 crew banging around. They can take it!

By the way, friends paid for materials, only $200-$250 for their box, love them all. Customers pay many times that amount for a box and I still make Southeast Asian wages because of the time involved to make one.
 

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Lucky2

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Mar 2, 2012
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New Brunswick/ Canada
Beautiful boxes Mark, it's sad that there's a plastic milk crate being set next to the wooden ones that all look so nice. But them's the breaks, not everyone can afford classy items. And your boxes are that for sure, classy, and built to last.

Len
 

mmayo

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Beautiful boxes Mark, it's sad that there's a plastic milk crate being set next to the wooden ones that all look so nice. But them's the breaks, not everyone can afford classy items. And your boxes are that for sure, classy, and built to last.

Len
I had one just like it for years. I told a really excellent woodworker friend of my plan to build a wood box, he said I was crazy. I did and three years later he sheepishly asked for one and got it. Here was El Primero, my first box - it was made of oak plywood. It was sold.
 

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Lucky2

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Mark, with it being your first I'm surprised you sold it, unless you had ideas on how to improve it. And with all kidding aside, I use milk crates for lots of things. I store items in them, and I use one to transport my propane tank in when I take it to be refilled. They're perfect for that, and the bungee cords safely hold hold them in place in the back of my truck. There's all kinds of uses for them, I use to have a tool rack made out of 16 of them. I had a 2"x 4" laying on the floor, and I started with that. I wanted something that would raise the front of the crates off of the floor, yet still leave the back of the crate on the floor. I wanted them tilted to the back, so that items wouldn't always be falling out. I fastened the first row of crates to the 2"x 4" with screws, and I used cable ties to strap the crates together. The only place metal parts were used. were when I fastened the first row of crates to the 2"x 4". All connections after that, were made with cable ties. This set-up worked great for certain sized tools, electric drill and circular saws, along with lights and other items. When I moved last fall, I left it there for the person who bought the place. He mentioned it in the deal, and he was paying me over asking price. So I left it there, and I already have the crates to built a larger set of milk crate shelves this time. This next time I plan to build, will be at least 6 crates by 6 crates high and maybe even larger. It takes no time to get them set up, and I get the crates for free. I do try to use all the same color crates, it looks better done that way. I didn't do that with the first one I build, but it bugged me so bad that I had to remove the off colored ones. After I build one of these shelves, I use a piece of 3/4" plywood on top to make a shelf top to place items on. And yes, because of the bottom 2"x 4" tilting the bottom ones, I have to put a shim under the plywood to level it off. Even with the wood I use to make a set of shelves like this, they are very light and easy to move around. They are about the cheapest set of shelves a person could make, there's little to no wood in them. But I would suggest buying them over stealing them, nobody needs a record for milk crate pilferage.

Len
 
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