Advice for creating my first shop

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brailsmt

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I just bought a home where I plan to build out a shop in the basement. The shop will basically be 24x20. I have an electrician coming out after I move in to install quad outlets every 6 feet at waist height, plus quads every 8' in the ceiling for lighting. I have budgeted $5k for building my shop and will be purchasing the following: dust collection, grinder, compound miter saw, table saw, router, drill press, disc/belt sander, band saw (most expensive, by far), air compressor, planner, and jointer. I still have overhead for misc supplies, like clamps and jigs and stuff. My first project will be a workbench. Any advice for a n00b that has done some homework?
 
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Curly

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You want some or all the wall sockets over 4’ so you can lean plywood against the wall and still get to the plugs.

Get a number of 220 circuits put in along the walls because you’re going to need them at some point.

Do more research into the dust collection as a proper one will, with ducting, be almost your total budget. If you buy a cheap thing and bukshee a cyclone add on to it, you and the rest of the house will be filtering the dangerously small stuff with your lungs.

If you can run some plumbing for a sink you’ll find it very useful.

Have fun and enjoy the results.
 
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jttheclockman

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I just bought a home where I plan to build out a shop in the basement. The shop will basically be 24x20. I have an electrician coming out after I move in to install quad outlets every 6 feet at waist height, plus quads every 8' in the ceiling for lighting. I have budgeted $5k for building my shop and will be purchasing the following: dust collection, grinder, compound miter saw, table saw, router, drill press, disc/belt sander, band saw (most expensive, by far), air compressor, planner, and jointer. I still have overhead for misc supplies, like clamps and jigs and stuff. My first project will be a workbench. Any advice for a n00b that has done some homework?
Sounds aggressive and I do not want to put a damper in your plans but that is not a big shop at all and i know because I work out of one about the same dimensions and to get those tools in there and be able to work in there is not an easy task. I suggest that you take it slow and decide what it is you want to make and be able to do in your shop. You mention bandsaw being the most expensive tool. Then I presume you will base your work around a bandsaw as opposed to a tablesaw. What is the panel situation to start with?? Do you have the capabilities for such an add on. ??? Some of those tools will need to be bench top and here is where you need to make decisions. Not all cut and dry fitting out a workshop. Everyone is going to tell you what they have. I suggest you do a plan layout before you start putting outlets willy nilly on walls. Draw up what you think is a good layout. You will need cabinets. You will need pegboard of some sort to store tools. You should include an air cleaner. Are you planning on doing finishing work because then that takes planning too. I suggest you place tools on wheels. Do you plan to duct the dust collector to tools or use flex hose and drag it around. This will effect size of collector. How tall is the ceiling?? Do not forget wood storage ability. Takes up room. I know. When I was building the cabinets and shelves for my shop I actually had to do it in the game room portion of the basement because as I said room is a premium when building large projects. My furniture days are over and days of real large projects.

My shop the tablesaw is the main important tool. Not a project gets done with out that tool touching it in some way. Can not say that about any other tool in the shop.

Again without knowing what your overall plans for projects it will be hard to suggest tools but if you are getting into furniture or larger projects you want big boy tools with HP. If you are doing small stuff then bench top tools will get you there. Build as you go and do not try to do it all in one shot. You will kick yourself later. Buy the best tools you can afford. As they say buy once. That is my advice.:):) 5K that is not going to do it. Sorry. Get you started but you will see.

You say your first job is a workbench. Again thought needs to go into it. Build it well and put on wheels. I would build a shelf under it to support various bench top tools. Do not get crazy and make it too wide. Length is better. Decide if you want an end vice. Always handy. I incorporated "T" tracks in the top of mine for various hold downs or jigs built off them. I suggest you add a power strip to the side of the rails somewhere with a chord to plug in somewhere. You then can plug various things in and charge things and leave under table. I pull most of my portable tools off that power strip as opposed to outlets on the walls. I have a bunch of 6 foot power chords that is use if I need to stretch the chords for use off the table. As I said think it through.

Here is an older photo of the top of my bench to show you what I meant.

 
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Shock me

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Agree with John that is ambitious-both in terms of space and budget. Consider a smaller number of higher quality tools. I would start with the best quality table saw you can afford (I’d strongly recommend SawStop cuz I like my fingers) and consider making it, along with a generous outfeed table the central focus of the shop. It takes up A LOT of space and unfortunately needs to be in the middle of the room. Then sketch out the space and play with what goes where. I’m guessing you already have the lathe, but now you need the space for it. You can squeeze all those tools into that space, but many of them need lots of clearance. To run a 6 foot board through your planer, you need 12 feet unobstructed. You can put a lot of them on wheels, but soon your shop turns into a sliding tile puzzle.

Agree with 220v outlets, someday you’re sure to “need” that new more powerful tool.
 

Woodchipper

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I wish I had 24x20. Start with a credit card that has a high limit. Ask your electrician about the code f or basements. My house originally had an unfinished basement and the outlets are 48 inches off the floor. Same is true with a garage- keep the outlets away from any vapors that accumulate on the floor. This from an electrician.
 

WriteON

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I just bought a home where I plan to build out a shop in the basement. The shop will basically be 24x20. I have an electrician coming out after I move in to install quad outlets every 6 feet at waist height, plus quads every 8' in the ceiling for lighting. I have budgeted $5k for building my shop and will be purchasing the following: dust collection, grinder, compound miter saw, table saw, router, drill press, disc/belt sander, band saw (most expensive, by far), air compressor, planner, and jointer. I still have overhead for misc supplies, like clamps and jigs and stuff. My first project will be a workbench. Any advice for a n00b that has done some homework?
Consider an air filtration unit...(Jet) Maybe 2 lathes. I use one for drill/squaring. Have a fire extinguisher or 2 handy. Have fun. Sounds greats. You're going to have fun place to hang out.
 

brailsmt

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I just bought a home where I plan to build out a shop in the basement. The shop will basically be 24x20. I have an electrician coming out after I move in to install quad outlets every 6 feet at waist height, plus quads every 8' in the ceiling for lighting. I have budgeted $5k for building my shop and will be purchasing the following: dust collection, grinder, compound miter saw, table saw, router, drill press, disc/belt sander, band saw (most expensive, by far), air compressor, planner, and jointer. I still have overhead for misc supplies, like clamps and jigs and stuff. My first project will be a workbench. Any advice for a n00b that has done some homework?
Sounds aggressive and I do not want to put a damper in your plans but that is not a big shop at all and i know because I work out of one about the same dimensions and to get those tools in there and be able to work in there is not an easy task. I suggest that you take it slow and decide what it is you want to make and be able to do in your shop. You mention bandsaw being the most expensive tool. Then I presume you will base your work around a bandsaw as opposed to a tablesaw. What is the panel situation to start with?? Do you have the capabilities for such an add on. ??? Some of those tools will need to be bench top and here is where you need to make decisions. Not all cut and dry fitting out a workshop. Everyone is going to tell you what they have. I suggest you do a plan layout before you start putting outlets willy nilly on walls. Draw up what you think is a good layout. You will need cabinets. You will need pegboard of some sort to store tools. You should include an air cleaner. Are you planning on doing finishing work because then that takes planning too. I suggest you place tools on wheels. Do you plan to duct the dust collector to tools or use flex hose and drag it around. This will effect size of collector. How tall is the ceiling?? Do not forget wood storage ability. Takes up room. I know. When I was building the cabinets and shelves for my shop I actually had to do it in the game room portion of the basement because as I said room is a premium when building large projects. My furniture days are over and days of real large projects.

My shop the tablesaw is the main important tool. Not a project gets done with out that tool touching it in some way. Can not say that about any other tool in the shop.

Again without knowing what your overall plans for projects it will be hard to suggest tools but if you are getting into furniture or larger projects you want big boy tools with HP. If you are doing small stuff then bench top tools will get you there. Build as you go and do not try to do it all in one shot. You will kick yourself later. Buy the best tools you can afford. As they say buy once. That is my advice.:):) 5K that is not going to do it. Sorry. Get you started but you will see.

You say your first job is a workbench. Again thought needs to go into it. Build it well and put on wheels. I would build a shelf under it to support various bench top tools. Do not get crazy and make it too wide. Length is better. Decide if you want an end vice. Always handy. I incorporated "T" tracks in the top of mine for various hold downs or jigs built off them. I suggest you add a power strip to the side of the rails somewhere with a chord to plug in somewhere. You then can plug various things in and charge things and leave under table. I pull most of my portable tools off that power strip as opposed to outlets on the walls. I have a bunch of 6 foot power chords that is use if I need to stretch the chords for use off the table. As I said think it through.

Here is an older photo of the top of my bench to show you what I meant.

I appreciate the honesty, really. There seems to be several price points for gear, <1k, 1k to 5k, and over 5k. The plan is to start with these tools and slowly upgrade them over time with the 1k+ versions of tools. A cabinet sawstop will probably be the first upgrade, since the table saw I'll be getting is a used contractor saw purchased from a friend. I suspect a larger lathe is going to also be one of the first upgrades. The bandsaw is because I read several articles recommending that as one of the first purchases and I've seen how often a band saw is used for turning bowls and other larger projects in videos. The home purchase was specifically well within my means to allow for budgeting funds for woodworking.

The space is larger than 24x20, it is more like 36x20, but there are things like furnace, washer and dryer, etc in the other portion, 24x20 is roughly the space I'll dedicate to the shop, but I have room to expand. I have wood storage space in my garage which is just through a door. The garage can be used to assemble larger projects. Dust collection will be a 1.5hp 1300cfm floor model from shop fox, which should be enough for my needs. I expect the cyclone, ducting, blast gates, shut off switches, etc... will be the largest misc expense starting up. Outlets will be 48 inches off the ground. The electrician is upgrading my service to 200amp and it will have plenty of space for running 220v outlets later but none of the equipment I will have now needs 220. Wheels will also be another misc expense, as will clamps and pegboard.

The plan is to do some furniture and a lot of turning projects. After the workbench, I need to make a bed for myself and a simple coffee table. After that I intend to mostly focus on plates, bowls, casting, and of course, pens with the occasional larger project.
 
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Talltim

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If I had my money all back that I have spent on tools there are a number of things I would do differently. I would buy fewer things and would’ve not cheaped out on a few things I got.

I might even consider going with Brynes instead of full sized.

Plan your wall space carefully. It gets used up quickly and there is never enough.


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leehljp

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Having woodworking friends around the States and world, and having watched some of them from the beginning, I most certainly would not establish the setup at the beginning, until I knew for sure where I was going. What you like to do the most determines what tools to buy.

Are you one who likes to get fine lumber and re-saw them? Suddenly you need a much larger than 14" bandsaw. But you have already got your 14 inch bolted down and in place that does not fit for well for a 17" or 19".

Is a 10 inch table saw big enough? (most of the time it is)
And do you suddenly need a sliding table for you saw? if you do heavy sawing, you will suddenly need 3 more feet of space for your saw.

You have a 12" - 14" lathe and find that you suddenly like making larger bowls; an 18" lathe adds to the needs that a 14" doesn't.

Do you do a lot of planing? An 8" planer and a 12" planer take different amounts of space.

Do you suddenly find yourself doing scroll saw?

Do you need a drum sander? what size?

THE POINT: If you know what you want to do, it is easier to buy and set up and anchor tools. However, if you are just starting out, flexibility, waiting on large purchases, with the option of upgrading and moving things around need to be built into the plan. In many cases, putting heavy tools (except large lathes) on roller stands may be the best for a year or two.
 
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mark james

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All the above comments are excellent for you to consider.

I'll only touch on one point - Dust collection and air quality.

My situation is similar with a basement shop. In an ideal world I would never have a shop in the basement due to the dust and fine particles that migrate upstairs. But, no choice, so make the best of it.

The 1.5 HP Shop Fox is similar to my Jet system and I am happy with it.

I'd strongly suggest you consider a quality ceiling mounted air filtration unit. I seldom empty my cyclone unit bag, but the air filters get clogged within a few weeks - and this is what we are breathing.

I have also positioned my unit for the air flow out coming towards my lathe and the intake port for the cyclone unit - it greatly assist to direct my lathe work into the dust collector.

To me the air filtration is not secondary to dust collection - it is essential in a basement shop.

I also have a window mounted fan which I use when the temps are reasonable to suck the room air out the window. This is a cheap $30.00 fan, but also helps.

Have fun.
 

Shock me

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Consider French cleats along the walls. Then when you realize what you should have done, you just swap things around.
 

jttheclockman

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As you can see from those that answered the theme is planning as well. I have a Delta 10" contractors saw that I bought when I first built my shop and it today is still the main focus of the shop and has built many projects including some furniture.

Will say this doing flat work takes more tools, space, and resources than does any kind of turning. You again have to ask yourself will I be buying my lumber in the rough or will I dress it and all aspects of it in the shop and if the answer is yes do not skimp on quality tools. You will regret it. You talk about bowl turning, will you be using logs to the get to the finished product and if so how large?? This will dictate the size and horsepower of the bandsaw and lathe.

There are many good books out there as well as videos and other resources with examples of shops and layouts. As you grow the layout will change. Notice I did not say may change. I have a 200 amp service and I put in a sub panel just for my shop. The use of many circuits and seperated circuits will be an advantage when using multiple tools. Yes 220 outlets will be needed but not as many as you think. Unless you buy dedicated 220 volt tools. Good luck in your toy room.
 

RobS

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I have seen a lot of people putting their router, and table saw on higher end casters, which allows the unit to be rolled out, that may be something to look into. Note the unit would have to be rigid to ensure everything stays level.

I find drawing a too scale room, and then cutting out the items to scale and moving them around on the layout helps determine what would and would not work for space, or you could model it up in onshape https://www.onshape.com/ to ensure you have enough room.
 

brownsfn2

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One thing that I wish I could have done if I had the resources was to refinish the basement ceiling in the shop and enclose the furnace. The smells, dust, and noise from the basement do make their way upstairs. If I would have spent time sound proofing the ceiling and cutting off the furnace from the rest of the room then I think that would have helped. I was able to build a small "closet" with sound proofing for the dust collector so that you can barely hear it upstairs. That helped a lot. That is my 2 cents though...
 

randyrls

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Plan your wall space carefully. It gets used up quickly and there is never enough.
This is actually one of the things I'm most worried about. I'm not sure how to plan that out.
Some time ago on "Woodsmith Shop" I saw this idea for pegboard storage. You can put many square feet of pegboard in a small space.
 
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monophoto

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You will actually need more receptacles than you plan on. DAMHIKT Draping extension cords across the shop is inefficient and dangerous.

Ideally, you should have several receptacle circuits, preferably 20a. Think carefully about the situations where you will be using multiple tools at the same time. Having several tools plugged in is not a problem, but coincident use causes loads to add up. And be aware that some tools have an inrush that could cause the circuit breaker to trip if you have other tools running on the same cirtcuit at the same time.

Always have the lighting on its own circuit, separate from receptacles and especially, tools. Having tool problem that causes the lights to go out can be dangerous!

You see a lot of 'pretty' shops on YouTube. That's nice, but its not necessary. A shop is a place to work. But having said that, comfortable makes work more pleasant. So plan on lots of light. LEDs provide a lot more light while consuming a lot less energy, and they last forever.. I prefer 'Daylight' over other color temperatures because they give greater apparent brightness. However, you should think about the impact of the color temperature of your lighting if you are going to be doing exotic finishing.

Think about temperature. It's not living space, but it shouldn't be frigid in the winter, or sweltering in the summer.

And don't forget the fire extinguisher and the need for an emergency exit.
 
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bmachin

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I'm going to get a little contrarian here.

My suggestion would be to initially put your money into getting your wiring done since you are going to need that regardless of what direction your muse ends up taking up you.

Buy the contractor's saw from your friend, and you're good to go.

I started with a 10" Craftsman table saw in the extra bedroom of a two bedroom apartment after covering the carpet with 1/8" Masonite. (I DID warn the neighbors and never had a complaint). The first thing that I built was a Taig Frid european style bench from plans in Fine Woodworking.

With no more than that, a drill, a router, and several hand tools, I built numerous 18th century end tables, sofa tables, benches, mirrors, and chests.

Over the years, I've collected a lot more machines. They can certainly make things easier and faster, but not necessarily more pleasurable.

I would just say don't move too fast on buying machinery. You aren't going into business. I'm sure that there are lots of sources of hardwood lumber in Kansas City and I suspect that most of them can provide custom milling to S3S so you won't need a planer or jointer.

Lots of good flea market and Ebay hand tools out there at reasonable prices with flea market being better.

Hand tools can be fun and satisfying.

Take a look at Paul Sellers videos on YouTube as well as his website paulsellers.com.

I mentioned the bench that I made 40 years ago. Paul Sellers has a series of videos where he makes a bench from reclaimed construction lumber and is starting one where he makes a nearly identical bench from plywood. My son and I are building a Sellers bench for him from poplar. I believe that if I were starting over this is the bench that I would build for myself.

Sorry for all the randomness.

Bill
 

greenacres2

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Lots of good stuff here. The "quad outlets" you mention--if the 4 receptacles are all on the same circuit, they do little good if you need 12 amps for your tool and 10 amps for your vacuum. I have 3 circuits in my garage, each with 3 consecutive drops--if i need to use two outlets at the same time for the same task (shop vac & sander for example)--i need to run a cord for the second. If money were no object, the 3 circuits would be plenty, but i'd drop at least two circuits to separate duplex outlets at each location. Just to be able to split the load to different circuits (probably an easier way to say or do that--i'm not an electrician). Also, at least a third of my drops are not accessible--behind plywood or whatever. I'd wonder if it would be possible to install chase around the ceiling perimeter that would allow me to tap down the wall or across the ceiling as needed from pre-installed junctions. As mentioned--pretty is not as important as function for this purpose.
earl (clearly not an electrician or interior decorator!!)
 

brailsmt

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You will actually need more receptacles than you plan on. DAMHIKT Draping extension cords across the shop is inefficient and dangerous.

Ideally, you should have several receptacle circuits, preferably 20a. Think carefully about the situations where you will be using multiple tools at the same time. Having several tools plugged in is not a problem, but coincident use causes loads to add up. And be aware that some tools have an inrush that could cause the circuit breaker to trip if you have other tools running on the same cirtcuit at the same time.

Always have the lighting on its own circuit, separate from receptacles and especially, tools. Having tool problem that causes the lights to go out can be dangerous!
I took a lot of these considerations into account when talking with the electrician. Each quad will be on its own circuit and lights will be on their own circuit. Thanks for confirming those are the right moves.
 

brailsmt

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Lots of good advice here. Thank you all. I have no idea what tools I will use the most. I plan that I will be reconfiguring things quite a bit and as I begin using tools, I'll see which ones I gravitate towards. The least important tools for me would probably be the planer and jointer, but it seems every single project starts with "buy lumber, then joint/plane it..." which is why I included them in this initial build out of tools. There is a whole lot of naivete that has gone into this plan, though I have done a bunch of research. I still have a month or two probably before I start building this in earnest, but the miter, router, table saw, dust collection, and air compressor will be purchased in the first week of having the house. I should have plenty of time to figure this out and I'll be sure to check in here often.
 

jttheclockman

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Lots of good advice here. Thank you all. I have no idea what tools I will use the most. I plan that I will be reconfiguring things quite a bit and as I begin using tools, I'll see which ones I gravitate towards. The least important tools for me would probably be the planer and jointer, but it seems every single project starts with "buy lumber, then joint/plane it..." which is why I included them in this initial build out of tools. There is a whole lot of naivete that has gone into this plan, though I have done a bunch of research. I still have a month or two probably before I start building this in earnest, but the miter, router, table saw, dust collection, and air compressor will be purchased in the first week of having the house. I should have plenty of time to figure this out and I'll be sure to check in here often.
I believe what Louie was telling you is it maybe a good idea to run 2 seperate circuits to a quad box and split them there. If one tool draws 10 amps then you are pushing the circuit if using another big draw tool at the same time plugged into the same box.

The tool that I wished I had bought sooner was a drum sander. When I first started I would sand all boards down with a 1/2 sheet sander and a random orbital sander. Now so easy to go over to the drum sander. I buy my boards in the rough and mill on site so I need all the tools mentioned also. You may want to do some air line plumbing in the ceiling too if you have a couple different work stations that may need air pressure. Being the service is being upgraded this means an inspection so if he is doing the work along with service change he will have to abide by latest rules and codes for outlets and they will not let you put lights on the same circuit as outlets.

One other thing I see it was mentioned about building a seperate room for dust collector, remember it needs to be vented and not sealed.

You can make it work for sure. Take your time and again think things out.
 

MRDucks2

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When I did my purpose July woodworking shop, pole barn style 30x40 with concrete floor I had at each pole (8 foot on center) a quad 120 box fed from 2 circuits on each and every other pole had 220 to it. I also ran max lighting for a single 14 gauge circuit down each side, split with quad switches. I believe I had 16 lights plus 2 indoor outdoor ceiling fans in one end. Never put a tool in it before I sold it.

The tough thing about the basement is the overhead if an older home. To handle 8 foot material easily a 10 foot ceiling is ideal. An 8 foot ceiling is tough and even in a 9 foot ceiling you will be hitting your lights if the hang.


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KenB259

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I have a basement shop. First thing I did was put up a wall to segregate it from the furnace. I have a smallish dust collector and a hanging Rikon air cleaner. No dust makes it upstairs, except what’s on my shoes. Very happy with my space. It’s not huge, about 14 x 25, but serves my needs perfectly. I have no desire to do large projects though. If I did, I wouldn’t have room. Best advice has already been stated, plan your shop based on what you want to create. That’s not always easy because it sometimes is a moving target.


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MDWine

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. . . Always have the lighting on its own circuit . . .
FWIW, I just switched my little shop over to all LED lighting overhead, AND in my clamp lights... FABULOUS, BRIGHT, QUIET!!! Recommend highly!

I've read this thread over several times (I'm way too excited for you!)... Take pictures from start to finish, and watch the transformation.

So, WHEN DO WE GET STARTED? lol

Sounds like a great journey, and we want to come along! Good luck!
 
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beck3906

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My shop is 32x40 and I wish I had done several things differently. Needed 220 outlets in different places than where they are. Needed more 220 outlets. Needed more 120 outlets. Needed 120 outlets at floor level in my shop office.

Make sure outlets are on different circuits. I have a 200 amp box and have space for more circuits and wish I had them.

I will be using one of the circuits over time to add a dedicated A/C system to 3 smaller rooms I have in the shop.

Wish I had installed a tankless hot water system instead of a 6 gallon water heater.
 

leehljp

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I just remembered what I did in my first built shop that was very helpful. PAINT the inside a very light color and paint the shelves too. I painted mine a very light shade of grey (on sale brought back by a customer) and it made a huge difference in the lighting. And this brings up the other help: plenty of light.

4 important things before adding any tools:
• Paint with light color
• Electrical (mentioned several times already)
• Lighting
• Shelving - I painted the shelving too, especially the underside which makes the items under it easier to see.
 
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monophoto

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One more suggestion -

You mentioned that your shop was in the basement (as is mine). If possible, think about adding a slop sink. There are situations where you need water, and dragging in water from an upstairs bath or kitchen is a hassle.

The big issue is the drain - because you are below the level of the house drain. My solution was to put a sump pump (with a float switch) in a catch basin, with a drain line that goes upward, through a check valve, in to the house drain. I made mine from individual components, but you can buy kits that include an enclosed reservoir, pump and float switch.
 

brailsmt

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One more suggestion -

You mentioned that your shop was in the basement (as is mine). If possible, think about adding a slop sink. There are situations where you need water, and dragging in water from an upstairs bath or kitchen is a hassle.

The big issue is the drain - because you are below the level of the house drain. My solution was to put a sump pump (with a float switch) in a catch basin, with a drain line that goes upward, through a check valve, in to the house drain. I made mine from individual components, but you can buy kits that include an enclosed reservoir, pump and float switch.
There is already a finished bathroom in the basement, so I will be keeping that. The basement is actually ground level, well its on a hill. I need to get foundation work done before I start building out the shop and they'll be installing a sump, but I'm going to have them seal it. I'll take pics when I get started.
 

brailsmt

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Dec 6, 2018
Messages
102
Location
Kansas City, MO, USA
. . . Always have the lighting on its own circuit . . .
FWIW, I just switched my little shop over to all LED lighting overhead, AND in my clamp lights... FABULOUS, BRIGHT, QUIET!!! Recommend highly!

I've read this thread over several times (I'm way too excited for you!)... Take pictures from start to finish, and watch the transformation.

So, WHEN DO WE GET STARTED? lol

Sounds like a great journey, and we want to come along! Good luck!
I have a 6 pack of some daylight LED shop lights already in my shopping cart on Amazon. They will be the very first thing that goes up after the electrician pays a visit.

As for pics, good idea. The basement is 1/2 finished, and that is going to get demo'd. Then foundation work, then the electical, then... I'll take pics, if I remember. I move next week, and that is when the demolition begins, muahaha! The best part? Waste wood from the 2x4s. :biggrin:
 

brailsmt

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Dec 6, 2018
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102
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Kansas City, MO, USA
I closed on the house today. Cleaning ladies cleaned everything. Movers come tomorrow. Demolition on the finished portion of the basement begins soon (can you say stress relief?). I will make sure I post plenty of pics of the process. The foundation guys are coming the week of March 4th, the electrician is contracted and should have permits and stuff all straightened out by the time the foundation guys are done. As I build, I intend to update here. Big power tools are mostly purchased, and so it begins...
 

brailsmt

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Dec 6, 2018
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102
Location
Kansas City, MO, USA
And so it begins...

I moved in yesterday, slowly unpacking. These are shots of the shop space before anything has been done. I have my equipment on order and my electrician is obtaining permits. I have my friend coming over tomorrow to help with demolition of the finished portion of the basement, which needs to be removed for foundation work anyway. Once the foundation work is done, the electrician will do his thing. Then I'll paint the ceiling white and start trying to figure a layout for everything. I'll post updates periodically.


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brailsmt

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Dec 6, 2018
Messages
102
Location
Kansas City, MO, USA
Well, all my equipment is in except for the bandsaw (went with a 14" Rikon), drill press (shop fox floor standing oscillating), air filter (Wen something or other), and dust collection. I have about another week or two worth of work to convert the basement to a shop. I have to wait until foundation guys fix my foundation next week. Then I'll be painting the ceiling, walls, and floor and get to work on my workbench. While working on the workbench I'll find so much wrong with my setup. I can't wait!
 
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brailsmt

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Joined
Dec 6, 2018
Messages
102
Location
Kansas City, MO, USA
Demolition completed!

Demolition is done. We carted off a ton of sheetrock. We also pulled every single nail and removed every screw from those boards. We recovered a ton of waste wood, some of it will probably even be useful for creating my first workbench. The plan today is to remove the carpet then do some other work around the house. I hope to post a pic with everything cleared out later tonight.


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