Wish I knew this 40 Years Ago. (Plastic Wood Discussion)

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KenB259

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So this is my weapon of choice for wood filler, that will not show. MY whole life, I use a little and by next time its dried out to the point I just throw it away and buy new. There's tiny little print on the can saying if it dries out, just add a little acetone to the can and voila, good as new, I tried it, and it worked fine My other perplexing question regarding this product....... Why do they print the cans upside down?
 

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jttheclockman

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Wow that stuff has been around for ages. It also comes in tubes. I remember when I was about 7 years old and my Dad had dormers put on our house because we needed the room as the family grew. He did all the interior work from hanging the sheetrock to painting it when done. The only things he did not do was plumbing and electrical. This is where my construction ability and love for working with my hands started. being he also did all the trim work and nailed all by hand, no nail guns back then, it was my job to fill nail holes and then later sand those nail holes by hand using that same exact stuff. Looks like the cans did not change over those years. This is going back 60+ years. A walk down memory lane. Oh and that stuff stuck to the fingers and never wore off. When you peel it off it took some skin with it too.
 

jttheclockman

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Storing upside down the product creates a seal
In a way. The product in the can is not liquid but when it comes the can is actually not full. It is about 3/4 full. If you open a new can and push the product down into the can you will see there is alot of air in it. To prevent the product from drying in the can it is stored upside down and the air is now trapped at the opposite end of can which is the bottom and the product oozes to the lid. Basically how you would store paint cans but it is not as liquid.

One tip is after you take out what you need, immediately close the lid and if you have enough product do not put any leftover in can because you now introduced more air. The air bubble things only works as long as there is enough to seal the can. best to buy in small cans. waste less.

I remember my father adding light weight motor oil in it to loosen up. Just a couple drops. Not sure if the product has changed over the years but that tip worked.

The idea was good but you need to scrape the sides to get the product to the center of can again because the shear weight of it is what they depend on to reseal the can again when you flip it over. But if there is a big hole in the center than that seal will not work and yes it dries out. But boy does that stuff dry hard and never cracks.
 
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Woodchipper

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Woodcraft sells an aerosol can of an inert gas, Bloxygen, that prevents oxygen from getting to the material. Used for paint, varnish, lacquer, etc.
Edit: There are a lot of things I wish I knew 40 years ago!
 
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