What would you do?

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Cwalker935

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I glued up padauk and maple because I needed a larger block to do a teapot demo. I decided to finish it and could not decide what kind of top to put on it so I cast some tea in acrylic and made his top. Even though the woods will darken with finish but I am not sure if the colors will work. I hate to discard the top since I like the thought of putting tea in the teapot and it was a lot of extra work. BTW, I will probably shorten the spout.

Would you finish the wood?

Stain the wood darker?

Or scrap the lid and do some other lid?

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mark james

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This is a touch call Cody. While I like each element, they don't seem to go together. I would certainly keep the cast lid - and to use it with a more complimentary vessel, but turn a different lid for this pot. If it was me I would finish the pot, no stain. Turn a lid in the same wood. Try to cast a vessel blank to pair with the current lid.

Nonetheless, a great project.
 

MRDucks2

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I respectfully disagree with Mark on this one. With so much contemporary style using mixed media and contrasting colors these days, I believe it will be a hit as is for some folks.

I expect many of us on the site tend to like things that flow into each other and go together, being woodworkers. However, I can easily thing of 4 or 5 people off the top of my head who would like this in its present color scheme very much.
 

southernclay

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I think a line or brush strokes of darker stain from the spout to near the handle and then finish on top would pull all of it together. Just a simple design or slightly wavy line. Nice work!
 

Kenny Durrant

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I’m one who normally like things to match or flow. Oddly though I like it as is. Like you said the wood should darken when finished so that might help enough to go together. I’d leave it and get an idea of what the public thinks and go from there.
 

bsshog40

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I think if the spout and handle matched the color of the lid or close to it, would make a world of difference. Pretty cool though, nice work.
 

Charlie_W

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Cody, I would turn another lid (wooden) and see how it looks. If you like it, sand it up. If you don’t like it, all you’ve lose is some time and a small block of wood ...you won’t know if you don’t try.
For me, the three differing colors are all competing for ones eye saying, “Look at Me!...no, Look at me first.etc.
Maybe if the maple were black like the lid with the padauk being the alternate color. It would give a different vibe.
Also, you have your lid being shiny against the wood. Perhaps, save the lid for a different project as Mark suggests.
You could always ask Lida.
Another thought is to leave the spout long and add eyes.... and a propeller on top of the lid!🤣❄
Let us know your final choice.
 

Cwalker935

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Thanks everyone for your feedback. Interestingly, I was contacted by someone wanting a teapot yesterday and shortly after posting this thread worked out a deal for this teapot. The buyer really liked the contrasting colors and wants it finished as is.
 

Charlie_W

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Thanks everyone for your feedback. Interestingly, I was contacted by someone wanting a teapot yesterday and shortly after posting this thread worked out a deal for this teapot. The buyer really liked the contrasting colors and wants it finished as is.
Congrats on the sale!
Now you don’t have to ponder re-working it.
 

MRDucks2

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Good for you on the sale! The toughest part of making things to sell, or selling the things we make, is limiting our customers to our own likes and dislikes.

If we can experiment, communicate well (which includes listening) and go outside of our comfort zone we can open our markets further.

You have consistently shown your ability to step out of your comfort zone far beyond what most of us are capable of. That’s a good thing.
 
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