Voltage tester

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jttheclockman

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Joined
Feb 22, 2005
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14,806
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NJ, USA.
Best in the business hands down and my go to meter when I was in the field. Now I have the 1000volt rated one but all you need is 600V one.(0 to 600V) Reads voltage, continuity or (resistance) and also is an amp meter. It reads both DC and AC . It is Digital which is easy to read. It is rugged and can stand dropping. These type are better than the solenoid ones because you can leave connected longer without burning up the solenoid. Totally tested before shipped and accurate. Now just about any volt meter will work but some of those meter ones can be dangerous when working in panels. I have all the attachments such as case. clip on clips and also have their tick tracer which is excellent to. Yes pricey but the best in the business. Next in line is the Klein model. Both digital like this and solenoid type. Meters are made for bench work. Where you can set meter on the desk and test boards.

https://www.amazon.com/Fluke-Electr...tage+tester&qid=1609858307&sr=8-4&tag=mh0b-20
 

frank123

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Joined
Feb 5, 2012
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609
Location
Colorado
If you're just trying to find out if there is power to the wires, the little voltage detectors that don't need actual contact with a bare wire are pretty useful, you just hold them up next to the wire, or plug them into the slot in an outlet, and they flash and sound a tone if there is voltage present. Hot wire lights up and neutral doesn't, so it makes it real easy to check for and find reversed wiring and/or verify if the power is on or off without having to take anything apart first or make any actual contact with a hot terminal.

They're cheap and should be available almost anywhere that sells electrical supplies.
 

jttheclockman

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Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
14,806
Location
NJ, USA.
If you're just trying to find out if there is power to the wires, the little voltage detectors that don't need actual contact with a bare wire are pretty useful, you just hold them up next to the wire, or plug them into the slot in an outlet, and they flash and sound a tone if there is voltage present. Hot wire lights up and neutral doesn't, so it makes it real easy to check for and find reversed wiring and/or verify if the power is on or off without having to take anything apart first or make any actual contact with a hot terminal.

They're cheap and should be available almost anywhere that sells electrical supplies.
Now these proximity detectors or Tic Tracers are good for detecting if there is voltage. But if using in a junction box with a bunch of wires and if more than one has voltage on it is tough to trace because they will detect Voltage with in certain distances. But they are handy. The receptacle testors are very good for checking outlets because it will detect if wired correctly and if ground is present.

https://www.amazon.com/Fluke-1AC-A1...tage+tester&qid=1609862063&sr=8-6&tag=mh0b-20
 

egnald

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Jun 9, 2017
Messages
510
Location
Columbus, Nebraska, USA
Greetings from Nebraska - Rather than spend money on a voltmeter, I think the inexpensive circuit tester that has two leads and a miniature neon NE2 type blub as an indicator. (Should cost less than $10). For switches, the switch should be in the OFF position when testing. Attach one lead of the tester to a "return" or "neutral" wire - according to code the wire should be white. Use the other lead to determine which connector on the switch is the "hot" or "line" wire. In a pinch if there are no obvious "return" or "neutral" wires to attach to, one lead can be attached to "ground" - a green or bare wire or metal switch box that is grounded. There are some other tricks that can be done using this kind of neon tester, but they really need to be left to experienced electricians. Good Luck and use appropriate caution when working on live circuits. - Dave
 

WriteON

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Aug 21, 2013
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2,427
Location
Lake Worth,Fl. / BlueBell, Pa.
Now these proximity detectors or Tic Tracers are good for detecting if there is voltage. But if using in a junction box with a bunch of wires and if more than one has voltage on it is tough to trace because they will detect Voltage with in certain distances. But they are handy. The receptacle testors are very good for checking outlets because it will detect if wired correctly and if ground is present.

https://www.amazon.com/Fluke-1AC-A1...tage+tester&qid=1609862063&sr=8-6&tag=mh0b-20
This what I'm looking for. Is this particular Tic a decent one?
 

jttheclockman

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Feb 22, 2005
Messages
14,806
Location
NJ, USA.
This what I'm looking for. Is this particular Tic a decent one?
I own a bunch of them. This is the one I go to most of the time. One of the best on the market. The next most used is my Klein one. The Greenlee from Home Depot is a good one as well as Ideal one. Klein Tool one is a very good one too. My Greenlee broke the tip and never replaced it. I use to have these all over the shop, in my tool pouches and always carried one in my pocket at all times when I was working. Takes no time to just check if you have power. Great on extension chords and in my line of work every aspect of it. South Wire and Sperry are very good as well and can be trusted. Some have a feature more than others but they all work the same.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=tic+trac...=c&hvqmt=b&tag=mh0b-20&ref=pd_sl_9ohnp2909w_b
 
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