Tried something different before drilling

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KenB259

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Since this pen contains a lot of aluminum and knowing the drill bit would be in contact with it the entire time, I decided to encase it in hard maple. Drilled it slowly to minimize any heat and it worked perfectly. Would it have been okay without the maple? Maybe but I liked the little extra bit of insurance. Woods are a very very plain piece of goncola alves, rosewood end caps and some green swirly acrylic and of course a little .032 aluminum. Pen is a gunmetal and chrome Gatsby.
 
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mark james

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The finished pen is beautiful Ken. Great combination of materials, and your drilling modification was well served.

Very nice. đź‘Ź đź‘Ź
 

leehljp

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Since this pen contains a lot of aluminum and knowing the drill bit would be in contact with it the entire time, I decided to encase it in hard maple. Drilled it slowly to minimize any heat and it worked perfectly. Would it have been okay without the maple? Maybe but I liked the little extra bit of insurance.
Blowouts are greatly reduced with that mindset. And I didn't say it for you, - you know that!
Excellent pen and design!
 

magpens

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Very nice work, Ken !!!
The component pieces of the blank complement each other very well !!!
And your method of support during drilling is good to keep in mind.
Thanks for showing.

Just one question ... did you drill the blank on the lathe ?
 

KenB259

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Very nice work, Ken !!!
The component pieces of the blank complement each other very well !!!
And your method of support during drilling is good to keep in mind.
Thanks for showing.

Just one question ... did you drill the blank on the lathe ?
I do all my drilling on the lathe. That’s also why I added the maple to all 4 sides , I wanted to keep the blank square.
 

leehljp

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Ken, when using aluminum how do you sand without getting aluminum dust into the wood?
Frank, Ken's method is something that experienced people have learned and it is not difficult. Ken recommends it often, and I do also when I get the chance. It is not about our skill - but about helping others achieve similar results.

A very sharp tool and fairly high rpm 2000 to 3000. I usually turn at 3000. A fresh carbide in a shear cut as Ken mentioned, and I use my HSS scrapers honed to a very sharp edge. It makes for a SMOOTH finish without sanding dust.

One thing that I learned quickly: apply some thick layers of CA if you want a shiny finish. You need to apply enough so that you do NOT sand through back down to the blank. IF you do, the sanding smear crops up and you will have to turn it with the shear cut again to get the CA off. You cannot sand the CA off. Therefore, it must have a thicker layer than normal few thin layers. Sanding and buffing the CA is OK and will produce the shine. Just do NOT sand through the CA.
 

KenB259

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Frank, Ken's method is something that experienced people have learned and it is not difficult. Ken recommends it often, and I do also when I get the chance. It is not about our skill - but about helping others achieve similar results.

A very sharp tool and fairly high rpm 2000 to 3000. I usually turn at 3000. A fresh carbide in a shear cut as Ken mentioned, and I use my HSS scrapers honed to a very sharp edge. It makes for a SMOOTH finish without sanding dust.

One thing that I learned quickly: apply some thick layers of CA if you want a shiny finish. You need to apply enough so that you do NOT sand through back down to the blank. IF you do, the sanding smear crops up and you will have to turn it with the shear cut again to get the CA off. You cannot sand the CA off. Therefore, it must have a thicker layer than normal few thin layers. Sanding and buffing the CA is OK and will produce the shine. Just do NOT sand through the CA.
After reading Lee’s response, got to thinking maybe my response sounded flippant. If so, it truly wasn’t my intent. No sanding on certain blanks is just my method. It truly isn’t that hard but does require some practice. Best way is to chuck up a pen blank, dont use a chunk of pine, use a hardwood, doesn’t have to be exotic and just practice. Reason I said to not use pine is it’ll cut different than the woods we all make pens from. You’ll just get a feel for it. Glad to help any way I can.
 

leehljp

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Ken, I didn't think your answer sounded flippant at all. But, Sometimes we may sound condescending to some when we give a detailed answer, and then unintentionally sounding flippant with a short answer - but you didn't. That comes with the territory on such a large membership/audience as we have here.

You have been superb in creating new things and with precision on top of that. And you have been a great resource to those who asked. Thank You for what you do here!
 

magpens

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@KenB259 @leehljp

I agree with Lee .... and I would also like to express my thanks to Ken for his willingness to share his knowledge and skills ... always helpful IMHO !!

I just wish I had more of his skills.

One thing at the moment ... what is meant by a "shearing cut" as that term applies to the use of a carbide cutting tool ?
Ken recommended, above ... "No sanding at all. Sharp skew or carbide with a shearing cut. I used carbide on this one."

I would like to learn to learn to turn a blank that is segmented with aluminum in a way so that no sanding is necessary.

Does the term "shearing cut" mean that you twist the carbide cutter so that its top surface is not in a horizontal plane ? . Thanks in advance.
 

KenB259

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@KenB259 @leehljp

I agree with Lee .... and I would also like to express my thanks to Ken for his willingness to share his knowledge and skills ... always helpful IMHO !!

I just wish I had more of his skills.

One thing at the moment ... what is meant by a "shearing cut" as that term applies to the use of a carbide cutting tool ?
Ken recommended, above ... "No sanding at all. Sharp skew or carbide with a shearing cut. I used carbide on this one."

I would like to learn to learn to turn a blank that is segmented with aluminum in a way so that no sanding is necessary.

Does the term "shearing cut" mean that you twist the carbide cutter so that its top surface is not in a horizontal plane ? . Thanks in advance.
Shearing cut to me means to cut with the carbide angled to between 30 and 45 degrees and the handle of the tool also canted to the opposite of the cut direction. Just like we’d ride the bevel on a tradition tool. Hope that makes sense.
 

Frank727

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Thanks for the reply’s everyone.I have a tshadow magical scew which creates a shear cut. I will give that a try.
 
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