tooling for threading

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stuckinohio

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Hello,

I want to start threading without taps and dies. I am having a difficult time finding the proper tool for threading. It seems like I have only found tooling for internal threads that has a minimum bore of 1/2 inch, which is fine for M14, but if I wanted to do smaller size for cap or whatever I would need a smaller tool, unless I am totally not understanding this.
https://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=3570&category=

I've looked around but I think the more I search the more I get confused and lose track of what I have found.

It would be nice to find some tooling a little cheaper too... I want replaceable carbide inserts as well. I hate sharpening and I am in fact terrible at it.
 
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More4dan

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You can make your own internal threading tool using drill rod. Machine a 60 deg taper from both sides and grind it down just past half way and on the back side leaving a 60 degree tip on a small diameter rod. Taps are so much easier to use and repeatable though.
You will have to heat above where the steel no long sticks to a magnet and quench to harden.

Danny

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bmachin

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Lewis,

I'm with you, especially for i.d. threading. Go to thinbit.com and download their catalog. They specialize in small bore tooling. Unfortunately, they ain't cheap. Their stuff is available on Amazon.

Here are the Thinbit part numbers for what I use if you want to check them on Amazon:

Toolholder: MGT14 (Threads down to 8.25mm i.d.)
Threading tool: MGTTD5L
Tool Adapter: AD38 (You can make this yourself)

I went through this a few years ago, small bore tooling is hard to find.

PM me if I can help.

Bill
 

stuckinohio

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Dan - I will thread with taps and dies most of the time but I want to make my own pistons or have the freedom to do different threads when I want for caps, but especially for nibs. I also want the freedom to make threads for other proprietary items like vacuum pumps.

Oh, and I hate sharpening!

Bill, thank for the links! I'll check them out for sure and I will most likely be hitting you up!
 

magpens

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The first tool you show does seem exorbitantly expensive but I have noticed the same with other brands also. The fact that you get 3 cutters contributes to the price of course.

The minimum bore of 1/2" that you are finding is probably because the tool needs to be able to withstand the lateral stress without significant bending.
 

smik

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stuckinohio

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Mal and Smik,

Good point on strength. If my vision of a piston system design is correct, I shouldn't need to extend the tool very far on internal threading situations, so I don't think the high dollar tools will be needed.
 

More4dan

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Dan - I will thread with taps and dies most of the time but I want to make my own pistons or have the freedom to do different threads when I want for caps, but especially for nibs. I also want the freedom to make threads for other proprietary items like vacuum pumps.

Oh, and I hate sharpening!

Bill, thank for the links! I'll check them out for sure and I will most likely be hitting you up!


You also have the option for making your own specialty taps. That way you spend the set up time once for threading the tap instead of each and every pen. You also reduce the risk of failures in your pen blanks. Quality control in an external thread is a bit easier than an internal thread. Especially for small diameters.

However learning to ID thread on the lathe will be a good learning experience. I look forward to seeing your results.

Danny


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stuckinohio

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Dan,

I like the idea of making a tap to do the threading. Seems way easier than cutting internal threads over and over! Also, thank you for the link. I'm trying to figure out all this stuff without any experience or hands on is difficult for me!

Manny,

I saw those. good price for sure. do they need to be sharpened repeatedly?
 

bmachin

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Lewis,

Note that the minimum bore for the LMS tool is 1/2".

As far as sharpening goes, It's HSS after all: Your mileage will vary.

Bill
 

magpens

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Making your own specialty taps. Bock 5mm

Dan,

You referenced your thread with the above title which I read.

I must be missing something. . How does 0.253" relate to 5 mm ?

I calc that 5 mm would be 0.197"
 

magpens

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Well ... OK, Pete ... I have had one quick read and I still don't get it.

One thing I did get, though, is that Beaufort uses "plug" to mean "bottoming".

Seems to me that "we" use "plug" to mean "intermediate". . Or am I screwed up ?
 

Phil Dart

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Well ... OK, Pete ... I have had one quick read and I still don't get it.

One thing I did get, though, is that Beaufort uses "plug" to mean "bottoming".

Seems to me that "we" use "plug" to mean "intermediate". . Or am I screwed up ?
"Two countries separated by a common language" George Bernard Shaw.

We are a UK based company, therefore we use the UK nomenclature, however, we do put the translation there for you colonials too:wink:

What you call a bottoming tap, we call a plug tap. What you call a plug tap, we call an intermediate tap. We also put the pictures there for the avoidance of doubt.

I happen to think that bottoming is a much better name by the way, but don't let on I said so. I don't want to upset the natives on this side of the water.
 

More4dan

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Dan,

You referenced your thread with the above title which I read.

I must be missing something. . How does 0.253" relate to 5 mm ?

I calc that 5 mm would be 0.197"
I meant a Bock #5 nib and feed. Not 5mm. Sorry for the confusion. It is a strange thread size to use. It seem to be a poor mashup of 1/4" thread with a Metric 0.6mm pitch. Easy enough to re-create on a metal lathe but expensive to have made. I used these homemade taps for a handful of kitless pens, and they work quite well for aluminum, brass, and acrylics. They worked ok with stainless steel. I thread on the lathe with a tap guide in the tailstock to keep everything straight.

I've since joined in on the last group buy and purchased a set of plug taps for #5 & #6 JOWO and Bock feeds as well as some triple start tap and dies.

Making my own taps taught me how to thread on the lathe and got me into making kitless pens a year sooner than had I waited for the Group Buy. After threading on the lathe for a while I switched to taps and dies with the tailstock holders and guides. They are SOOOO much easier and quicker to use. The finish of the threads are also better and the mistakes are much fewer.

There is a great satisfaction in making your own tools too especially when starting out on a budget.

Danny
 

stuckinohio

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Dan,

You referenced your thread with the above title which I read.

I must be missing something. . How does 0.253" relate to 5 mm ?

I calc that 5 mm would be 0.197"
I meant a Bock #5 nib and feed. Not 5mm. Sorry for the confusion. It is a strange thread size to use. It seem to be a poor mashup of 1/4" thread with a Metric 0.6mm pitch. Easy enough to re-create on a metal lathe but expensive to have made. I used these homemade taps for a handful of kitless pens, and they work quite well for aluminum, brass, and acrylics. They worked ok with stainless steel. I thread on the lathe with a tap guide in the tailstock to keep everything straight.

I've since joined in on the last group buy and purchased a set of plug taps for #5 & #6 JOWO and Bock feeds as well as some triple start tap and dies.

Making my own taps taught me how to thread on the lathe and got me into making kitless pens a year sooner than had I waited for the Group Buy. After threading on the lathe for a while I switched to taps and dies with the tailstock holders and guides. They are SOOOO much easier and quicker to use. The finish of the threads are also better and the mistakes are much fewer.

There is a great satisfaction in making your own tools too especially when starting out on a budget.

Danny
Danny,

I agree about the taps and dies being so simple. for some reason threading on the lathe seems like voo-doo magic to me. Basically because I haven't tried it yet I guess. I really wouldn't even fool with it but I want to improve my skills and there seems to be several things that require special taps. Namely the Parker Vacumatic pump and making my own pistons. From what I gather you need to use the lowest thread count per inch possible to reduce the amount of turns needed to extend and retract the piston. It is difficult to find taps and dies with a low TPI, at least for me searching the net and barely knowing what I am looking for... Another thing would be nib housings for manufacturers than Jowo and Bock.

I just wanna have the ability I guess!
 

More4dan

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Dan,



You referenced your thread with the above title which I read.



I must be missing something. . How does 0.253" relate to 5 mm ?



I calc that 5 mm would be 0.197"


I meant a Bock #5 nib and feed. Not 5mm. Sorry for the confusion. It is a strange thread size to use. It seem to be a poor mashup of 1/4" thread with a Metric 0.6mm pitch. Easy enough to re-create on a metal lathe but expensive to have made. I used these homemade taps for a handful of kitless pens, and they work quite well for aluminum, brass, and acrylics. They worked ok with stainless steel. I thread on the lathe with a tap guide in the tailstock to keep everything straight.



I've since joined in on the last group buy and purchased a set of plug taps for #5 & #6 JOWO and Bock feeds as well as some triple start tap and dies.



Making my own taps taught me how to thread on the lathe and got me into making kitless pens a year sooner than had I waited for the Group Buy. After threading on the lathe for a while I switched to taps and dies with the tailstock holders and guides. They are SOOOO much easier and quicker to use. The finish of the threads are also better and the mistakes are much fewer.



There is a great satisfaction in making your own tools too especially when starting out on a budget.



Danny


Danny,



I agree about the taps and dies being so simple. for some reason threading on the lathe seems like voo-doo magic to me. Basically because I haven't tried it yet I guess. I really wouldn't even fool with it but I want to improve my skills and there seems to be several things that require special taps. Namely the Parker Vacumatic pump and making my own pistons. From what I gather you need to use the lowest thread count per inch possible to reduce the amount of turns needed to extend and retract the piston. It is difficult to find taps and dies with a low TPI, at least for me searching the net and barely knowing what I am looking for... Another thing would be nib housings for manufacturers than Jowo and Bock.



I just wanna have the ability I guess!


I’d be happy to talk you through threading on the lathe. I’m not an expert but I’ve learned through the internet and some practice.

What model lathe do you have?

Danny


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stuckinohio

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I have two metal lathes:

PM1127 and a vintage Logan Powermatic. I would be learning on the PM and using it primarily but the Logan will cut much lower TPI than the PM. Off the top of my head it goes down to 4 TPI

I'll forest Gump my way through the threading using the machinist book and internet/youtube until I get stuck then I'll reach out!
 

lorbay

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Try Banggood. They have a ton of insert threading tools. And nearly always free shipping
Lin
 

frank123

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Cutting external threads is relatively easy and only requires a regular tool bit ground for the type of thread you are cutting.

Cutting internal threads in small holes (where you can't actually see the threads or easily measure thread depth as you cut them) is much easier using a tap in a tap holder mounted in the tailstock with the piece mounted in the chuck (to be certain of concentrically to the bore).

If you're making a non standard thread size or thread profile, it's easy enough to just make a tap by external threading a piece of metal rod of appropriate OD (plain old mild steel works well on plastics, use hardening steel for harder materials).

If you insist on internal threading by single pointing, a small tool steel boring bar can be fairly easily reground to be a threading bit if you're reasonably good at tool grinding. (tool steel boring bars are available but not the most common so you may have to look around a bit. I've found carbide to be significantly harder to grind and resharpen than are tool steel boring bars)
 
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