The Acrylic Revolution

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spiritwoodturner

Guest
Very interesting, and all in one place. I learned a lot of new things off that! Thanks for sharing, Scott.

Dale
 
M

Mudder

Guest
Very interesting, and all in one place. I learned a lot of new things off that! Thanks for sharing, Scott.

Dale

Please note that I only put these up. The are written by our membership. We should thank Bill for sharing.
 

BigShed

Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
1,060
Location
Adelaide, SA, Australia.
Bill, thanks for that article, very informative.

However, you refer to the PR resin type blanks as thermoplastics, they are actually thermosetting

From Wikipedia on Polyester resins:

Polyester resins are thermosetting; "thermosetting" means the plastic softens when initially heated, but sets permanently rigid once it has cooled (as opposed to "thermoplastics", which re-soften with heat). Polyester resin is often purchased in liquid form for the production of glass-reinforced plastic. In this case, a catalyst (typically methyl ethyl ketone peroxidebenzoyl peroxide is a somewhat less hazardous alternative suitable for some purposes.(MEKP) (also known as butanone peroxide) is used to initiate the polymerization reaction;


In general all the resins you refer to in your article are of the thermosetting type, ie they cure by heat or catalyst, once this process has taken place it cannot be reversed.


Thermoplastics OTH can be re-melted after processing.

Sorry, once a chemist, always a chemist!
 
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