Tailstock Power Drilling Adapter

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rherrell

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I have a new product called the Tailstock Power Drilling Adapter.


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You can read all about it here...


http://www.penturners.org/forum/f349/custom-made-penturning-tools-accessories-92501/


THANKS for looking!
 
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TonyL

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I am not sure what to do with it, but I will get one. I need to send you the measurements. I have a Jet 1221 EVS. Do you know the measurements? Thanks Rick. I love and own many of your products (in some case doubles and triples).
 

magpens

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Not sure either. . The rotation comes from the headstock, so the purpose of this device must simply be to provide motorized advance and retraction of the tailstock chuck (which is holding the drill bit). . The drill would be operated at an appropriate (variable) low speed. . And I guess you would have to provide your own jig/bracket for holding the drill because it wouldn't be good for it to be unsupported. . You could hold it by hand but you also need your hands to change the workpiece in the headstock chuck, and possibly the bit in the tailstock chuck, as well as to control the on/off of the lathe and its speed.

I'd like to get one. . Will have to figure out how to get the wheel off my tailstock ... I think it is held on with a rolled pin so I would have to punch that out. . The wheel would have to go back on for other jobs.
 
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TonyL

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Good guess. I called him and left a message. I don't think I like that idea, but he is a lot smarter than me.
 

southernclay

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Dawsonville, GA
Cool idea, this allows you to drill with the ease and accuracy of the lathe without using the hand wheel when batch drilling.

Rick,
I assume you still turn the lathe on when drilling? I usually drill around 500 rpm should that be lowered to account for the drill speed or does it have much affect?
 

larryc

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Mableton, GA (Near Atlanta)
Not sure either. . The rotation comes from the headstock, so the purpose of this device must simply be to provide motorized advance and retraction of the tailstock chuck (which is holding the drill bit). . The drill would be operated at an appropriate (variable) low speed. . And I guess you would have to provide your own jig/bracket for holding the drill because it wouldn't be good for it to be unsupported. . You could hold it by hand but you also need your hands to change the workpiece in the headstock chuck, and possibly the bit in the tailstock chuck, as well as to control the on/off of the lathe and its speed.


Plus you need one hand on the chuck at all times in case it comes loose from the tailstock and starts to flail around. Not enough hands I'm thinking.
 

rherrell

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Hey guys, thanks for all the comments. I just finished drilling 200 blanks for making my Sanding Sleeve Sets and I can tell you it works great!


As far as the drill being unsupported, I used a corded 1/2" Dewalt which is about as heavy as they get and I didn't have any problems. There's not much torque needed, my 1/2" drill is overkill, so a small cordless should work.


My handwheel only has a single set screw holding it on so it's not a hassle to remove it. If yours has a pin holding it maybe I can come up with another solution, something that can be left on all the time. I don't know, I'll have to study on that one:biggrin:
 

More4dan

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Hey guys, thanks for all the comments. I just finished drilling 200 blanks for making my Sanding Sleeve Sets and I can tell you it works great!


As far as the drill being unsupported, I used a corded 1/2" Dewalt which is about as heavy as they get and I didn't have any problems. There's not much torque needed, my 1/2" drill is overkill, so a small cordless should work.


My handwheel only has a single set screw holding it on so it's not a hassle to remove it. If yours has a pin holding it maybe I can come up with another solution, something that can be left on all the time. I don't know, I'll have to study on that one:biggrin:



I was thinking maybe a 1/4” drive socket recessed in the hand wheel and a 1/4” socket driver in the drill. Something I can play with in my “spare” time.


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SteveG

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Eugene, Oregon 97404
When drilling blanks, my mind has often wandered and wondered about ways to motorize the feed and retraction at the tailstock mounted drill bit. This looks good, but some way to do it without removing the hand wheel would be even greater. I really like the concept! Thanks Rick.
 

TonyL

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Hi Rick, I left you a message yesterday or the day before. But forget that. I drill on my Jet1221 EVS. If you know the measurements, then I will buy one.
 

More4dan

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Hey guys, thanks for all the comments. I just finished drilling 200 blanks for making my Sanding Sleeve Sets and I can tell you it works great!


As far as the drill being unsupported, I used a corded 1/2" Dewalt which is about as heavy as they get and I didn't have any problems. There's not much torque needed, my 1/2" drill is overkill, so a small cordless should work.


My handwheel only has a single set screw holding it on so it's not a hassle to remove it. If yours has a pin holding it maybe I can come up with another solution, something that can be left on all the time. I don't know, I'll have to study on that one:biggrin:



I’m thinking, would an electric screw driver work? Slower rpm and not much torque required. Quicker to reverse with the rocker switch.


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magpens

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I’m thinking, would an electric screw driver work? Slower rpm and not much torque required. Quicker to reverse with the rocker switch.
Actually, I think that some considerable torque is indeed sometimes required.

What's more, control of the torque is also often required. . In my drilling, I don't just ram the drill through the blank. . I frequently go by the feel ... especially when I am starting the hole. . In some materials, in order to get a hole accurately aligned with the blank axis you have to start very gently and slowly. . The same is true if the end of the blank into which you are forcing the drill bit is not accurately squared with the blank axis.

I have been thinking about this whole on-lathe drilling process overnight (ie. slept on it !!) and have concluded that I prefer to not have a power drive for the drill bit in most cases for the above reasons.

I would only use the power drive under special circumstances ... on MY lathe.

For me, it is important to "get the feel" of the drilling process ... and especially at the start of the hole ... but sometimes throughout the drilling operation.

I think there can be a few "gotchas" and I prefer to do the drilling with my hand on the tailstock wheel.

For retracting the drill, I would definitely say the power would be a big plus .... but I don't think you can have it both ways.

These are just my thoughts ... for MY lathe ... for the work I most commonly do.

So, for me, at this time, no motorization ... but thanks anyway, Rick. . I could revisit my decision. :):):):)
 
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rherrell

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No problem, give me a call when you have 200 blanks to drill.:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:







I’m thinking, would an electric screw driver work? Slower rpm and not much torque required. Quicker to reverse with the rocker switch.
Actually, I think that some considerable torque is indeed sometimes required.

What's more, control of the torque is also often required. . In my drilling, I don't just ram the drill through the blank. . I frequently go by the feel ... especially when I am starting the hole. . In some materials, in order to get a hole accurately aligned with the blank axis you have to start very gently and slowly. . The same is true if the end of the blank into which you are forcing the drill bit is not accurately squared with the blank axis.

I have been thinking about this whole on-lathe drilling process overnight (ie. slept on it !!) and have concluded that I prefer to not have a power drive for the drill bit in most cases for the above reasons.

I would only use the power drive under special circumstances ... on MY lathe.

For me, it is important to "get the feel" of the drilling process ... and especially at the start of the hole ... but sometimes throughout the drilling operation.

I think there can be a few "gotchas" and I prefer to do the drilling with my hand on the tailstock wheel.

For retracting the drill, I would definitely say the power would be a big plus .... but I don't think you can have it both ways.

These are just my thoughts ... for MY lathe ... for the work I most commonly do.

So, for me, at this time, no motorization ... but thanks anyway, Rick. . I could revisit my decision. :):):):)
 

vtgaryw

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Jul 24, 2012
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Milton, VT
Not sure either. . The rotation comes from the headstock, so the purpose of this device must simply be to provide motorized advance and retraction of the tailstock chuck (which is holding the drill bit). . The drill would be operated at an appropriate (variable) low speed. . And I guess you would have to provide your own jig/bracket for holding the drill because it wouldn't be good for it to be unsupported. . You could hold it by hand but you also need your hands to change the workpiece in the headstock chuck, and possibly the bit in the tailstock chuck, as well as to control the on/off of the lathe and its speed.


Plus you need one hand on the chuck at all times in case it comes loose from the tailstock and starts to flail around. Not enough hands I'm thinking.

So, Zaphod Beebelbrox would be a great pen turner!

-gary
 

magpens

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Coquitlam, BC, Canada
No problem, give me a call when you have 200 blanks to drill.:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin ::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::big grin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:
Rick, I certainly was not knocking your product ... please don't get me wrong. . I have the greatest regard for your products. . I frequently check you out on IAP.

As I tried to express, I do my drilling extremely carefully and I often need to "feel" my way at the beginning of every drill operation. . That requires "hand on wheel" in my case. . My work is almost totaly "one-offs".

Best regards,
 
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