Square tool edges!

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Woodchipper

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Mar 15, 2017
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Cleveland, TN
Back again with another question. I'm sure that I'm the only one who gets catches. As a result, my tool rest has a couple of deep nicks that would require removing a lot of metal. Have already hit it with a file but there are a couple places that are deep, as I mentioned. The tool hangs up and "ruins" a smooth movement from side to side on a piece. Read somewhere that one can round off the edges of a tool. Anyone done this? Thanks.
 
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rherrell

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Aug 22, 2006
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Pilot Mountain, NC
I rounded off the edges of all my turning tools and it helps quite a bit. I use an air grinder with an 80 grit sanding disc but a Dremel tool will also work. You can also use a bench grinder. It doesn't take much, just knock the edge off.
 

howsitwork

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You can also make a really nice round chisel by buying a piece of round 1/2" HSS and then grinding the end from either side, with frequent stops to let it cool. once you get close to a pointed end ( as it where ) slow up and let it cool some more before finishing . Then use a diamond stone , waterstone or linisher to hone the finish.

Remember the finish you get on your workpiece can only ever be as good as the finished surfaces of the cutting tool.
 

penicillin

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Feb 27, 2019
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Woah! It feels like deja vu. I spent the past day and a half practicing with my skew chisel on turning stock that I cut from old construction lumber.

I can make that skew dance, sing, slice, dice, and do everything but turn beads reliably. Turning beads gave me a lot of spiral catches. A lot. I am patient and stubborn and kept working on it. I would have a bunch of catches, then go back inside to look at my books, online videos, anything. I walk out, sure I've got it figured out, and BAM! again.

I can turn beads with my eyes closed with a spindle gouge, but I want to learn to make them reliably with the skew chisel.

I am using those Rockler tool rests with the hard steel rod across the top. Despite that, I created a couple dings across the top. A light filing, a gray ScotchBrite pad, and Renaissance Wax cleaned it up.

That final catch bit the very tip off the toe of the skew chisel, so I have some resharpening to do on top of everything else. Dang!
 

penicillin

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Feb 27, 2019
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One of my children gave me a basic digital microscope for Christmas a couple years ago. It is so easy to use. Here is the chipped toe of my skew chisel. It happened on the last catch before I gave up yesterday. It will take at least a couple hours to grind it out with that lousy Grizzly wet grinder I have:

Chipped Toe of Skew Chisel.jpg
 

sorcerertd

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Sep 30, 2019
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North Carolina, USA
I've seen some rounded skews and wondered how well they would work for me. Ed uses one in his EB demo videos. It seems like they would be easier to use laying flat on the rest, which would not cause those dimples in it. This is referring to the cutting edge, not the shank. I hear that the oval shank skews are a pain to sharpen.
 

howsitwork

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Oval shank skews are difficult but not impossible. It's actually easier to hone the damn thing sharp with a diamond stone than to grind it I find !

I prefer my round skews to be honest but the oval with a curved edge does work well in certain. situations.
 
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