Spalted Magnolia Bowl

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Dehn0045

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Mar 19, 2017
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1,355
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Houston, Texas
I haven't turn many bowls, probably fewer than 10. Most of the info that I have come across says wet wood is easier to deal with for turning, but I struggle with tear out and cracking. Now that I have a carbide tool I find dry wood to be easier. This piece of wood I found along the road a couple of years ago, I processed and then let it sit. Was pretty much dry throughout, so turning was a little slow, but didn't have to deal with as much tear out and cracking shouldn't be a concert. I left it a little chunky in part by design and in part because I was worried about a catch destroying all my efforts. Finish is beeswax, 7.5 inch width by 3.5 depth

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MiteyF

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Jan 27, 2018
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173
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Bay area
Looks great. I think you may find that a properly sharpened bowl gouge will give far less tearout than carbide. Give it a fighting chance, you may be surprised.
 

mark james

IAP Collection, Curator
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Sep 6, 2012
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Medina, Ohio
I have several bowls that look very similar. Not as refined as could be, but we actually used them weekly for a few kitchen items (mostly my wife's minature chocolate stash). Just a thought, the bottom can be made quite a bit more tidy. I have cole jaws, which are great, but there are substitutes to aid in cleaning up the bottom.
 

Dehn0045

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Mar 19, 2017
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Houston, Texas
Looks great. I think you may find that a properly sharpened bowl gouge will give far less tearout than carbide. Give it a fighting chance, you may be surprised.

I have a set of cheap bowl gouges, I have tried them but haven't put in the time with them to learn the techniques. Maybe some day.
 

Dehn0045

Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2017
Messages
1,355
Location
Houston, Texas
I have several bowls that look very similar. Not as refined as could be, but we actually used them weekly for a few kitchen items (mostly my wife's minature chocolate stash). Just a thought, the bottom can be made quite a bit more tidy. I have cole jaws, which are great, but there are substitutes to aid in cleaning up the bottom.
Mine will probably become a candy dish for my office at work. Thanks for the comment about the bottom as well. I have been thinking that cole jaws might be a nice addition if I am going to turn more bowls. I have seen some different techniques but have opted to just leave the mortise so far - again my fear of being left with nothing compared to something mediocre.
 

Dehn0045

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Mar 19, 2017
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Houston, Texas
@MiteyF I took you advice and made a little new year's resolutions to learn the bowl gouge. I put a fresh grind on it and it went a lot better than last time. I used the carbide for the roughing, but the bowl gouge for the final shaping. Still struggling a little with tearout, but getting better.

Also @mark james I took your advice and turned away the recess on my most recent bowl. I used a jam chuck, it was a little extra work but was worth it.

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Woodchipper

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Mar 15, 2017
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3,292
Location
Cleveland, TN
Lyle Jamieson has a great video on bowl turning. It's four hours long; I watch one hour at a time. Need to review it and get turning!
 
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