Spalted box

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Terredax

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I was finally able to have enough time to test my table saw sled on a real project.
I can say that it performed better than I was expecting. Perfect angles, and without having to move the blade from zero. I tried to show a close up of the corner joints, but my camera ability is useless.

This is a box made for a close friend, and it's made from a spalted wood, that I have no idea of the species. It's just a box, nothing fancy, but I wanted the wood to be on display rather than any adornments.
I have several more board feet of this wood, so I can jazz up the next one.













 
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Terredax

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It looks like Spalted maple
That's what I thought too, but it has open grain.
I'll try to get a closer, more clear photo.
I just added a second coat of poly, and I'll probably add a third tomorrow.


The wood speaks for itself and doesn't really need any jazzing up! Well done.
Thank you. I want to add some legs to the next one. I have a few ideas, but it's hard to cover up the nice figure.
Maybe some contouring to the wood itself and leave it.



Nice box.

May I ask what you did inside the corners for joinery? Splines, biscuits, hidden dovetails, dominos?
I didn't add anything to the joints. Simply cut at 45 degrees and glued together.
 

Curly

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I didn't add anything to the joints. Simply cut at 45 degrees and glued together.
If you make a mockup of that joint in another piece of wood (any old scrap) and glue it together, you will find it has very little strength and can be knocked apart quite easily.

A small slot cut in the 45 degree face with a spline, made to fit, glued in will make a much stronger joint. A table saw cut will work but you see the spline in the ends. A router cut slot can be stopped before the ends and you would have corners that look like your box but be many times stronger so that if it were ever dropped :eek: the box would't come apart.

Ryobi made a little plate joiner / biscuit tool (DBJ50) that is perfect for making small boxes. They didn't catch on, probably because they were very basic but I like mine. Sometimes they come up on eBay.
 

StanBrown

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I didn't add anything to the joints. Simply cut at 45 degrees and glued together.
Rockler has a very nice 45 degree router bit. It cuts a locking 45 degree angle joint, cleverly made so that one bit does both sides of the corner. Rockler item no. 22627. I have one which I have used several times; it works very well. It creates a locking joint with lots more gluing surface than a plain 45. If you use a good quality glue, the joint will be stronger than the sides.
 

Terredax

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I have one of the lock joint router bits. I'm not real impressed with it, since it has to be set exact for the joint to come out correctly. It would be fine, if once it's set, it could be left alone. However, using different thicknesses of material, or changing bits, requires another set-up.

I usually use a lock joint I make on the table saw, but for this particular box, I wanted to test the accuracy of my sled. I've made boxes with 45 degree corners and glued, and so far (knock on wood), I haven't had a failure. I use Titebond III, and it's been incredibly strong.


This is the joint I use a lot for boxes.



It's easily made on the table saw or router table, and is very strong. Along with aligning the faces.

The tab and notch can be reversed to use the face as a veneer to cover the end grain.




 

StanBrown

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I have one of the lock joint router bits. I'm not real impressed with it, since it has to be set exact for the joint to come out correctly. It would be fine, if once it's set, it could be left alone. However, using different thicknesses of material, or changing bits, requires another set-up.

I usually use a lock joint I make on the table saw, but for this particular box, I wanted to test the accuracy of my sled. I've made boxes with 45 degree corners and glued, and so far (knock on wood), I haven't had a failure. I use Titebond III, and it's been incredibly strong.


This is the joint I use a lot for boxes.



It's easily made on the table saw or router table, and is very strong. Along with aligning the faces.
I agree, setup for the locking 45 is a pain. It only works well in a repetitive situation. I have used up many pieces of scrap getting the setup just right.

I often use the method in your first diagram for the backs of drawers. The vertical piece in your diagram would be the back of the drawer. The horizontal piece is the side. Some glue in the dado, a couple of brads through the joint from the back and you have an unbreakable connection.

I got away from Titebond III and started using Gorilla Glue. That was mainly because the closest hardware store stopped selling Titebond and started carrying Gorilla instead. I like Gorilla - it makes a very strong, tight bond - but it expands something fierce so you have to be sure to not use too much or you have an unsightly mess that is just about impossible to clean up.
 

Terredax

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Yes, the Gorilla glue is a urethane glue. It requires moisture, and the moisture is what causes the expansion and foaming.
The same thing happens with urethane resins (similar formulation to the glues), if moisture is present, they foam and expand.
A lot of people have problems with products like Alumilite and foaming. They don't realize it's caused by moisture.

I've used Titebond for many years, and it's always held strong.
 

jttheclockman

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John that came out well. Have to agree with Pete I too believe any box with 45 degree mitered corners needs a little extra support. I have used all methods he mentions including the ryobi biscuit jointer. No matter how small the box I make that has 45 degree corners will get some sort of support. My pool table pen box has a hidden spline joint. Have made larger cabinet type boxes with celebrated splines of different woods. I use Titebond II wood glue.

 

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