Simple Laguna 18/36 Question

Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
142
Location
Newfoundland
Hey All

I just ordered a new Laguna 18/36 lathe and while I have 220v power in my shop, I don’t know what type of plug my lathe will have. (Local store couldn’t figure out and neither could I.) I have not seen an 18/36 in person yet as no stores in NL stock larger lathes.

This is the type of plug I have in my shop to run the lathe:





Does anyone know what type of plug the Laguna comes with?
 
Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad

greenacres2

Member
Joined
May 2, 2017
Messages
887
Location
Northwest IN
According to the photo in the 4th post of a review on Sawmill Creek https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?251829-Laguna-Revo-18-36-220V-unboxing it looks like it comes with a NEMA 15 plug, which is what your outlet appears to be.

edit to add--it took a few minutes for the manual to download, but the suggested circuit in the manual is 20 amp, though the unboxing photo showed a NEMA 15. I'd suggest a call to Laguna or waiting to see what it comes with.
earl
 
Last edited:

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
12,269
Location
NJ, USA.
One of the things confusing me is that the plug is labelled 250V and 30A. I thought this type of plug in North America was 220v???
It is. The outlet is designed to handle 250 volts 30amps Safe to use no problem if that is what is needed but doubt it. A lathe would not need 30 amps, not at 220V
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
142
Location
Newfoundland
One of the things confusing me is that the plug is labelled 250V and 30A. I thought this type of plug in North America was 220v???
It is. The outlet is designed to handle 250 volts 30amps Safe to use no problem if that is what is needed but doubt it. A lathe would not need 30 amps, not at 220V
So, just so I have it clear, even though the outlet says 250V at 30 amps, if it actually 220V at 30 amps then it should be ok to run the 220V Revo Lathe which only requires 20 amps?

(Excuse my lack of knowledge here as I am clueless when it comes to wiring.)
 

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
12,269
Location
NJ, USA.
No you don't just plug it in and go:rolleyes:

First off when the lathe comes in it will be wired for a particular voltage and and have a amperage rating somewhere on the name plate. The chord supplied should match that set of specs. If it is indeed 220V and 30A then the chord will match this outlet you have. Now this outlet needs to be protected at the panel with a 30A breaker and wired for 220V. That outlet you have is a heavy duty motor rated outlet.

If the lathe comes in and it is wired for 220V and has a 20A chord on it and the nameplate states 20A max then this outlet, breaker is no good. The wire can still be used but the breaker and outlet need to be changed.

This will be in the instruction booklet.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
142
Location
Newfoundland
No you don't just plug it in and go:rolleyes:

First off when the lathe comes in it will be wired for a particular voltage and and have a amperage rating somewhere on the name plate. The chord supplied should match that set of specs. If it is indeed 220V and 30A then the chord will match this outlet you have. Now this outlet needs to be protected at the panel with a 30A breaker and wired for 220V. That outlet you have is a heavy duty motor rated outlet.

If the lathe comes in and it is wired for 220V and has a 20A chord on it and the nameplate states 20A max then this outlet, breaker is no good. The wire can still be used but the breaker and outlet need to be changed.

This will be in the instruction booklet.
This is contrary to what I thought. I was under the impression that a properly wired 220v 30Amp outlet/breaker could run a 220v 20Amp Lathe as there was more than enough capacity for the lathe. (Ie: The lathe only draws 20Amps max and I have the capacity for 30Amps so it is good.)

Is this wrong?

(Again, my apologies for my ignorance of wiring.)
 
Last edited:

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
12,269
Location
NJ, USA.
No you don't just plug it in and go:rolleyes:

First off when the lathe comes in it will be wired for a particular voltage and and have a amperage rating somewhere on the name plate. The chord supplied should match that set of specs. If it is indeed 220V and 30A then the chord will match this outlet you have. Now this outlet needs to be protected at the panel with a 30A breaker and wired for 220V. That outlet you have is a heavy duty motor rated outlet.

If the lathe comes in and it is wired for 220V and has a 20A chord on it and the nameplate states 20A max then this outlet, breaker is no good. The wire can still be used but the breaker and outlet need to be changed.

This will be in the instruction booklet.
This is contrary to what I thought. I was under the impression that a 220v 30Amp outlet could run a 220v 20Amp Lathe as there was more than enough capacity for the lathe. (Ie: The lathe only draws 20Amps max and I have the capacity for 30Amps so it is good.)

Is this wrong?

The chord will tell you what outlet is needed. It is the same thing if the tool was 120V you can not plug a 20A 120V chord in a 15A outlet even if the tool max amps is 15 amps. You need to protect the tool from shorts and overload.


http://www.irv2.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=119564&stc=1&d=1456094434
 
Last edited:

gtriever

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2017
Messages
1,115
Location
Paducah, Kentucky
Current-wise you're correct - A 30A MAX receptacle will handle anything up to that. The issue may come with the plug configuration, because even at 220 there are different plug styles... which I think JT is referring to.
 
Last edited:

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
12,269
Location
NJ, USA.
Current-wise you're correct - A 30A MAX receptacle will handle anything up to that. The issue may come with the plug configuration, because even at 220 there are different plug styles... which I think JT is referring to.
Yes that is what I am saying. I showed an example with 120volt outlets in previous post. Wait till you get the lathe and then get back to us when it comes in.
 

greenacres2

Member
Joined
May 2, 2017
Messages
887
Location
Northwest IN
What is stamped on that outlet is simply the maximum load that piece of hardware is designed to handle. The max load for the circuit is determined by the installed breaker and weight of wire feeding the outlet. Kind of like your car’s speedometer—just because the labels say 160 mph it doesn’t mean the engine and transmission will deliver it.
Earl
 

KLJ

Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2018
Messages
199
Location
Flat Rock North Carolina
I have the Laguna and page ten of owners manual it list 15 amp breaker for both the 110 and 220. The electrician that installed my power to mine said it needed a 20 amp so mine is on a twenty amp breaker. The plug is the smaller type plug not like a welder of clothes dryer I would take picture of it if I could. Looks like a normal plug except the left prong is like a sideways T and the right prong is flat instead of upright if that makes sense. If you want any numbers off the motor or cord let me know I will go look at it. The motor says 5.2 amp. I remember calling Laguna about this, but cant remember good enough to be sure but I think the 15 amp for the 220 was a misprint, but better ask someone that knows more than me.
 

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
12,269
Location
NJ, USA.
I have the Laguna and page ten of owners manual it list 15 amp breaker for both the 110 and 220. The electrician that installed my power to mine said it needed a 20 amp so mine is on a twenty amp breaker. The plug is the smaller type plug not like a welder of clothes dryer I would take picture of it if I could. Looks like a normal plug except the left prong is like a sideways T and the right prong is flat instead of upright if that makes sense. If you want any numbers off the motor or cord let me know I will go look at it. The motor says 5.2 amp. I remember calling Laguna about this, but cant remember good enough to be sure but I think the 15 amp for the 220 was a misprint, but better ask someone that knows more than me.
These are not 220volt outlets They are 120volts

http://www.irv2.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=119564&stc=1&d=1456094434

Again it all depends on the chord supplied. Is it a locking 20 amp chord and if so then you need a different outlet than shown here for 220V 20 amp. Do not change the cap end to match what outlet you have. This could lead to problems down the road for the next guy.

http://pre-electrician-apprenticeship.com/Photes/110V15_20AmpOutlet.gif
 

Charlie_W

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
5,131
Location
Sterling, VA USA
I checked online for the Revo 18/36 specs. While it doesn’t list which plug is on the unit, it does list the “recommended “ breaker amperage.
In the initial product list, it says a 20A breaker/ circuit....but if you click on the lathe manual, you will see it says the recommended breaker is 15A....and on another page, it also says 15A as you can see in the photos.

You show a 30A rated receptacle, you don’t tell us what size breaker is feeding that receptacle...nor what size wire. My recommendation like as JT says is to install the appropriate breaker for the lathe...or have an electrician do the job for you. If the existing 30A receptacle is indeed being fed by a 30A breaker, your lathe would run but should there be a short in the cord, motor, switch or electronics, it could overheat and catch fire before tripping the 30A breaker.....the appropriate breaker should trip sooner.

As others say.....wait till you see what the lathe has for a plug. You can get the matching receptacle and appropriate breaker at that time. If in doubt, have an electrician do the job.
Hope this helps.
 

Attachments

monophoto

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2010
Messages
1,442
Location
Saratoga Springs, NY
As others say.....wait till you see what the lathe has for a plug. You can get the matching receptacle and appropriate breaker at that time. If in doubt, have an electrician do the job.
Hope this helps.
This is very good advice.

This question originated in Canada, while the lathe is being shipped from the US. While electrical practices are similar on both sides of the border, there can be subtle differences. For that reason, it would be prudent to wait until the new lathe arrives to see the pin configuration of the plug.

And as others have noted, it may be that the standard in Canada calls for a pin configuration that is different from the lathe - and in that case, the right thing to do is follow the Canadian standard even if that means modifying the lathe.
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
142
Location
Newfoundland
Should have titled your thread "Not so Simple Laguna 18/36 Question".


Your not kidding.

I have an Electrician coming to relocate my plug to a more convenient location and add 2 more plugs. Going to let a pro handle it for me. :)

Thanks for the info though! I actually learned a lot from this.


Pen Turning on the Rock
 

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
12,269
Location
NJ, USA.
Should have titled your thread "Not so Simple Laguna 18/36 Question".


Your not kidding.

I have an Electrician coming to relocate my plug to a more convenient location and add 2 more plugs. Going to let a pro handle it for me. :)

Thanks for the info though! I actually learned a lot from this.


Pen Turning on the Rock

At least let us know what the outcome was after all this drama. Let him tell you why that outlet was not acceptable. He can explain things better with hands on material. :smile:
 

cleve

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2013
Messages
31
Location
Dawson Creek BC
I have the Nova 20-24 lathe and I took the info to the electrical wholesaler and they sold me all the stuff I needed to hook up the lathe, bandsaw and 2HP vac, this included the proper breakers and wire . I also bought enough cord and male and female plugs to make my own 20 foot extension cord.
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
142
Location
Newfoundland
Just wanted to say thanks for the help. Everyone here is great.

I got an electrician in as I wanted to install a few 110v outlets on their own 20A circuits/breakers anyway. The Electrician called Laguna and in less than 5 minutes he knew what type of plug and setup I needed. He ran that plug on its own dedicated circuit for my Lathe.

Now I have my Bandsaw, Table Saw, Drill Press, Dust Collector and Lathe all running on their own proper amperage circuits. Best part is that it wasn’t very expensive to have done professionally and I have peace of mind. :)


Pen Turning on the Rock
 

jttheclockman

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
12,269
Location
NJ, USA.
Just wanted to say thanks for the help. Everyone here is great.

I got an electrician in as I wanted to install a few 110v outlets on their own 20A circuits/breakers anyway. The Electrician called Laguna and in less than 5 minutes he knew what type of plug and setup I needed. He ran that plug on its own dedicated circuit for my Lathe.

Now I have my Bandsaw, Table Saw, Drill Press, Dust Collector and Lathe all running on their own proper amperage circuits. Best part is that it wasn’t very expensive to have done professionally and I have peace of mind. :)


Pen Turning on the Rock
You are so much better off having a pro do things like this. Could you tell us or show us a photo of the outlet needed for the lathe after all this drama. Thanks. I hope he told you why or why not you could not use the one you shown. It is great if you have the capacity in a panel to have those dedicated circuits for big tools. I happen to be able to do it because being an electrician I installed a sub panel just for my shop. Hope you enjoy your new lathe and safe working in the shop. :smile:
 
Top Bottom