Silver skeletonized pen

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jalbert

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May 17, 2015
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Louisville, KY
Here is a pen I finished a couple weeks ago that I finally got around to getting in the light box. It is a fountain pen with a skeletonized barrel overlay in silver, with a random linear motif. The barrel is made from transparent acrylic and black Ultem. The cap is made from black Ultem, and the cap band and clip are silver as well. OAL is around 5” from nib to end of barrel, which is about 12.5 mm at the cap threads, swelling to about 13-13.5mm in the middle of the barrel. It uses a jowo 6 nib, and can be filled via converter, or with a syringe for a cool effect of the ink being directly in the barrel.
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jttheclockman

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Feb 22, 2005
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NJ, USA.
Always a joy to look at your work. Thanks for showing and please keep them coming. Well done and I absolutely love the snow and evergreen photo.
 

magpens

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Feb 2, 2011
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Coquitlam, BC, Canada
Great work, John !!!

The silver you used ..... is it "pure" or an alloy ? . If an alloy, can you specify please.

Love the snow pic ..... especially the water droplets on the cap !!!
 

jalbert

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May 17, 2015
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Louisville, KY
@jalbert
Thanks, John. .

I am not that familiar with silver alloys, but I understand that argentium has a small percentage of copper with a little germanium added.

I'll check out its physical properties and, if suitable, look into buying some.
Some say it’s a designer alloy and not worth it...others say it’s great. Don’t get it just because I use it. You’d probably be fine with normal sterling. What are you doing with it? Are you decently versed in metalsmithing?
 

magpens

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Some say it’s a designer alloy and not worth it...others say it’s great. Don’t get it just because I use it. You’d probably be fine with normal sterling. What are you doing with it? Are you decently versed in metalsmithing?

@jalbert
Thanks for advice. . No, I would not be deliberately copying you, although I do like your layered technique of a cylindrical metal sheath over "plastic" .

I would have to learn the required metalsmithing.
At the present time, I work only brass and aluminum, as far as metals for pens goes. . Neither is "attractive" for a finished product.
So I am considering alternatives ... and yes, I know that the processes are different but not conversant with to what extent.
At this stage, I have no experience with casting of any kind. . I am not a materials scientist by any stretch.

I think my first avenue of "research" should be methods to harden and color aluminum .... anodizing ? . It will be a gradual learning effort.

So, to follow up on your possible recommendation of Sterling ....... what is it that led you to Argentium ?
 

jalbert

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Joined
May 17, 2015
Messages
718
Location
Louisville, KY
Thanks for advice. . No, I would not be deliberately copying you, although I do like your layered technique of a cylindrical metal sheath over "plastic" .

I would have to learn the required metalsmithing.
At the present time, I work only brass and aluminum, as far as metals for pens goes. . Neither is "attractive" for a finished product.
So I am considering alternatives ... and yes, I know that the processes are different but not conversant with to what extent.
At this stage, I have no experience with casting of any kind. . I am not a materials scientist by any stretch.

I think my first avenue of "research" should be methods to harden and color aluminum .... anodizing ? . It will be a gradual learning effort.

So, to follow up on your possible recommendation of Sterling ....... what is it that led you to Argentium ?
Sorry, not implying you were trying to copy...more that you should use it because it’s right for you, as it is trickier trickier to work than sterling, and more expensive. I like it because it’s more tarnish resistant, can be heat hardened, and casts cleanly, but those may only be marginally important to some people, considering the drawbacks.
 
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