Segmented Victorian

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Rink

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May 12, 2013
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Here's my latest pen...about number 30 or so. Segmented Victorian. Black Walnut and Cherry...both from trees taken down at my dad's place by a tornado a few years ago. This is for my mom's b-day. Made a similar segmented Triton for day for Fathers Day last month.

I'd love to hear any constructive comments on the segmenting and finishing. I've struggled with getting a good finish, but the article by Plano Harry helped tremendously, as did acquiring equipment to sharpen my chisels correctly.

thx, rink.
 

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SteveG

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your work looks good on this pen. If you want to kick your segmenting up a notch, you can try adding a metal layer between each segment: aluminum, brass and jeweler's bronze are some sheet stock available from various sources. The jeweler's bronze is probably the best match to the hardware on this pen. The metal requires more care when glueing and when drilling: more prone to self-destruction when drilling. So this step would be more challenging, but yields nice results.
 

OOPS

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I never would have thought to try segmenting on this style of pen--but it sure looks good! I don't have any specific comments for this pen, but just a thought. I have seen many who get excited about segmenting, and end up with so many segments per pen that it loses the beauty of the wood in the clutter of cuts. As stated above, using metal for segment layering adds a touch of class to the project. But going forward, I would offer that less is oftentimes more. If you intend to sell these pens, you will not be paid by the segment, but by the overall beauty of the pen.

Just my two cents, for your consideration.
 

OZturner

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Nice Pen, Rink.
I like to see Segmenting for Purpose and Effect.
By Purpose I mean breaking a plain material, with an Insert or Segment that lifts the Piece, by Contrast of Colour, Texture, Direction, Material or Whatever, but it has to add to and Improve the overall Visual Effect.
You have shown that you can Faultlessly Perform the operation of Segmenting,
What you should try now, is Segementing for Enhancement and Effect.
Also it appears that the bottom Blank doesn't neatly fit to the centre band.
Great Effort,
Brian.
 

Rink

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Wow, great feedback, guys. Thanks a lot for the advice and for the tactful manner in which it was dellivered! That kind of advice was exactly what I was looking for.

Steve - yes, metal is my next step. I have segments and some metal pieces ready for glue-up in the shop. Metal from a Mountain Dew can, and some aluminum flashing. I will practice on those, then graduate to slightly thicker sheet stock of some kind. Do you scuff the metal with sandpaper before glueing? What is a good thickness? And is it ok to turn it simply with my normal wood chisels? Any special finishing tips for metal segmented blanks?

Oops / Brian - good comments. Do you feel that this kit is ornate enough...without the segmenting? Maybe the segmenting is either lost or just makes the whole piece too busy? Brian, you are correct about the fit on the lower barrel. AFTER turning...I discovered that apparently I did not sand the end of the tubed blank at 90 degrees. I've plotted a solution for that!

Dan/Mark - thanks for your kind comments. With your experience, that means a lot.

This forum has been invaluable. Both as a source of technical advice, a source of inspiration, and generally just a good bunch of folks. And the incredible pen pics, geez!
 

mark james

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I agree that some metal would be a nice addition. And Brian has better eyes than me! But it's pretty close anyway.

Have fun.
 

OZturner

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Oops / Brian - good comments. Do you feel that this kit is ornate enough...without the segmenting? Maybe the segmenting is either lost or just makes the whole piece too busy? Brian, you are correct about the fit on the lower barrel. AFTER turning...I discovered that apparently I did not sand the end of the tubed blank at 90 degrees. I've plotted a solution for that!



Rink,
You are correct that the Victorian is an Ornate Kit, and therefore is readily supported by a single Material Blank. But that is not to say that a Segmented Blank is not suited to the Kit.
I appreciate the significance of your chosen materials, being Walnut and Cherry, from trees taken down by a Tornado at your Dad’s place, and that this Pen and the Triton were gifts for your Mum and Dad.
For what it is worth, I would have considered using a small section of Cherry at the Nib and Finial ends, and a similar sized piece at the Centre Band end, with Walnut in between for each Blank.
That way you are spreading the Segments to the extremes of the Blank, and you would let the Walnut be the predominate Material.
I empathise with you, with this pen, as both timbers are so significant to you and your parents, and of course you wanted to use them to take a major role.
But I believe the four sections and three joints in close proximity of the Centre Band on both Blanks, didn’t quite achieve the impact you would have wanted.
I also had the thought of putting a thin brass washer between each joint. But I would have to study that in the flesh, before gluing up the blanks.
I hope I haven’t confused or upset you.
Sincerely,
Brian.
 
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Rink

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Brian, no confusion or upset here at all. This is exactly the kind of feedback I was looking for, and these are lessons that will be in my thinking with every segment I do going forward. Thanks for sharing your experience.
 
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