Rockwell blade runner

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EricRN

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May 16, 2019
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Hi, Does anyone use a Rockwell blade runner? I don’t have the money or the space for a table saw or a high powered band saw. This seems like it might be a worthwhile investment given the price. But I’m curious how well it holds up and how accurate it’s cuts and fence system is. I’m typically skeptical of the accuracy of a saw costing $100. Haven’t had good experiences.

Right now I’m cutting everything by hand with a miter box. It works well enough but I won’t be able to segment with hand cuts. (If anyone has good recommendations for a miter box, I’m all ears. The only ones I seem able to find are the cheap yellow plastic ones at big box stores which wear out fast. My local Woodcraft doesn’t even sell them, which was surprising to me.). I do enjoy hand cuts so if I can find a good miter box I might just keep on doing that.
 
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EricRN

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May 16, 2019
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Thanks. I did look at those. The first review in particular was not that promising. Thought I'd see if I could get some more first-hand info here. I'm probably leaning towards just saving up for a 10' band saw--probably the Rikon model or the Jet. Those seem possible to get for $350-450, and I am guessing will be much more accurate for wanting to make precise cuts. I feel like for segmenting in particular, there isn't a big margin for error.
 

pshrynk

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Dec 6, 2017
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Lake City, Minnesota
I use my Craftsman 10" band saw for almost everything. I looked at those Blade Runners and they look like platform mounted jig saws from a cursory examination. I can generally get my band saw to do most everything except really big projects. Which I don't do any more.
 

jttheclockman

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Feb 22, 2005
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NJ, USA.
It is a gadget. Stay away from it. I do not own it or used it but just from what you said you wanted to do it will not do it. It is an upside down jigsaw designed for rough cutting. It will not be accurate just because the blade is anchored on one side.Slow cutting and just an all around waste of money. Get the bandsaw but buy the best and biggest you can afford. Those tabletop bandsaws can be a pain to keep the blade tracking properly. Do some reading of reviews before you buy and ask questions.

As for the old hand powered miter saw box, Stanley made a good one. But the key with those is not the box but the saw. A good stiff back saw is the key. Also a sharp saw blade. Those thin replaceable blades are notorious for not cutting straight because they wander thus the need for all those guide racks. Stay away from those type miter saws. You can get accuracy from one of the old time setups but for making segmented pen blanks it all depends how involved the design is. A good table saw with sleds is the way I like to do it. Good luck.
 

EricRN

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May 16, 2019
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Thanks. I agree with you on the table saw. I’d love to get a SawStop. I miss the days when I had access to a fully stocked wood shop at school. Unfortunately, I’m now working out of a two car garage that also houses two cars so a table saw is a tight fit. I’m hoping one day I’ll get the side cleaned up and decluttered and that I’ll have saved enough for a Saw a Stop that I can get on a wheel system. The idea being If keep it tucked against the wall and then pull the cars out and move the saw to the center when I’m working. But that’s a long way out before illl be able to find the space and the money.

A band saw seems like it’ll be the most economical in terms of both footprint and money.
 

jttheclockman

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Thanks. I agree with you on the table saw. I’d love to get a SawStop. I miss the days when I had access to a fully stocked wood shop at school. Unfortunately, I’m now working out of a two car garage that also houses two cars so a table saw is a tight fit. I’m hoping one day I’ll get the side cleaned up and decluttered and that I’ll have saved enough for a Saw a Stop that I can get on a wheel system. The idea being If keep it tucked against the wall and then pull the cars out and move the saw to the center when I’m working. But that’s a long way out before illl be able to find the space and the money.

A band saw seems like it’ll be the most economical in terms of both footprint and money.
I am going to disagree with you on the bandsaw thing but will say if you think sawstop is the answer to a tablesaw then you will not like my reply. Here is what you are not considering or I should put things you should consider. Are you strictly buying the tool to make pens, any handsaw will cut wood. When you talk bench top tools you need a benchtop and space to keep it so it is taking up room. You do not set up a bench top tool and keep moving it because the accuracy gets thrown out every time you bounce it around. Machines are meant to placed in places that are solid and keep from racking. These portable tools loose some of their accuracy due to underpowered motors and lighter weight materials so they can be moved around more easily. This affects blades and tuning. Both tablesaw and bandsaw are designed to do different chores well. Yes they can do some of the same tasks as well but not all. As I mentioned some of those bandsaw are hard to keep tuned well. As far as portable tablesaws the Dewalt and Bosch are 2 of the better ones that can be table mounted or come with wheels that run around $500. Less than a sawstop but that is in a class of its own. If you are into saving hot dogs than that is the saw for you. But a good tablesaw with the proper knowledge of its use and abilities and with proper safety equipment they can be as safe. This question comes up all the time here and if I had to choose one tool and one tool only it would hands down be a good quality tablesaw.I can work out the resaw aspect of a bandsaw if need be. That is the biggest advantage of a bandsaw over a tablesaw. Good luck in your search.
 

Curly

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Nov 20, 2010
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Lee Valley as always has a few options when it comes to doing stuff. They have several ways to approach the miter box. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/Search.aspx?action=n Getting a SawStop, even the small one, is a good idea when you start playing with small work and a good idea overall from the safety standpoint. I would take the bull by the horns and clean out the garage and optimize it for the woodworking you want to do before winter hits even if you aren't ready yet. Santa could be nice to you. If you live in a mild climate park your car outside if you can. My last place had a single car garage and the car was in it once for a week in the 25 years I owned the house. :)
 

KenB259

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Dec 24, 2017
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Michigan
The best advice I ever heard about buying quality tool is this. I want the quality of my work to be based on my ability, not my tools. I can always learn and improve, but you can never do that if any given tool you reach its accuracy limit. I started with all small bench top tools , good for what they were made for, but I soon found out they plain just weren’t accurate for what I wanted to do. I slowly have replaced them all with better tools.


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EricRN

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May 16, 2019
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Thanks all for the advice. I think you’ve all convinced me to save up for a good table saw and wait to buy something that isn’t a compromise. In the mean time, I’ll probably pick up one of the miter boxes at Lee Valley for precision cuts and use a small hand held circular saw I got for rough power cuts.
 

SteveG

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Dec 21, 2009
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For the many good reasons already listed, I recommend a reasonably decent quality table saw for your next tool purchase. With careful shopping (perhaps with a friend who has experience with table saw use and quality), you may do well shopping Craigs List. If you do that, the prospective purchase should get a thorough inspection/demonstration, along with a good discussion of its use and history. You would want to discern if it has lead a rough life, like job site work, and knocking around in the back of a truck, etc. Table saws that are mid-to-high grade last a long time if properly maintained.
 

John Eldeen

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Apr 3, 2019
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Sacramento, CA
I could not agree more with most of the previous comments. If precision is what you are after them a table saw should be your next investment. I have a fairly small work shop as well so unfortunately everything has to be able to move and for the most part nothing is left out and setup unless it is being used. For the reason I ended up purchasing the Bosch table saw https://www.lowes.com/pd/Bosch-4100-10-10-in-Carbide-Tipped-Blade-15-Amp-Table-Saw/1000498201. First the saw itself is great. Now with that being said the real selling point for me was the stand it effortlessly sets up and goes away. When it's folded up has a reasonable small footprint. After about 3 years with it I am still extremely happy with it. If you really want to spend some money keep going for that stopsaw but I don't have any need to cut hot dogs so the Bosch is just right. After that all you will need is a good sled and you well be set.
 

EricRN

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May 16, 2019
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Quick question: for the job site saw, can you take that and store it on it’s side. I did not think so, seems like it would throw the alignment off. But you mentioned it’s pretty compact when it’s broken down. You was curious how small you can get it and how you store it.

I’d consider the sawstop job site saw. That tech is pretty important to me. I got three kids that I hope will join me in the shop when they are older and, as a dad, it’s hard for me not to pay extra for something that might save them a terrible injury. Of course that’s not a substitute for teaching them safe operation to begin with. But nice to have the peace of mind.

Anyone have experience with the Bosch Reaxx or know if they even sell it in the US? I know there was a lawsuit or something awhile back. I like Bosch tools though. They had a big factory in the town where I grew up so I know a bunch of folks who work there. Good people and good tools.
 

John Eldeen

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Apr 3, 2019
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Sacramento, CA
Quick question: for the job site saw, can you take that and store it on it’s side. I did not think so, seems like it would throw the alignment off. But you mentioned it’s pretty compact when it’s broken down. You was curious how small you can get it and how you store it.

I’d consider the sawstop job site saw. That tech is pretty important to me. I got three kids that I hope will join me in the shop when they are older and, as a dad, it’s hard for me not to pay extra for something that might save them a terrible injury. Of course that’s not a substitute for teaching them safe operation to begin with. But nice to have the peace of mind.

Anyone have experience with the Bosch Reaxx or know if they even sell it in the US? I know there was a lawsuit or something awhile back. I like Bosch tools though. They had a big factory in the town where I grew up so I know a bunch of folks who work there. Good people and good tools.
Mine gets stored on it side mounted on the stand as it was designed to. It also goes in my truck to jobs from time to time and I have not noticed any loss in accuracy. With that be said it is not a fixed in place cabinet saw but a great second best for my situation I would say absolutely. Just as a side note all of the accessory for it clip on very securely and with all the movement have not came off.
 

Curly

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Nov 20, 2010
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Saskatoon SK., Canada.
Anyone have experience with the Bosch Reaxx or know if they even sell it in the US? I know there was a lawsuit or something awhile back.
Bosch lost the lawsuit for infringing on SawStop's patents and they can't be sold in the US. They are sold in Canada at Rona for a $234Can more than the SawStop version. If you are near a border you could drive up and buy one but I have no idea if your border service would let you take it back into the US. They might confiscate it so you'd best check on what they would do if you tried. https://www.rona.ca/en/reaxx-table-saw-with-rolling-stand-10-15-a-19835858
 
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