Reason why the youth contest is the most important contest

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edicehouse

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Since the start of this year I have not had more than 1 day off in a row. Several weeks have been 7 days a week. So the bash was not a priority to me. I had often tried the trivia, and those things. However I try to be good about having my kids (or at least one) enter the youth contest.

First of all it gives your kid (or grandkid, nephew, niece, neighbor) a great memory of you.

This year my best friends daughter made her first pen. His kids have called me Uncle Ed since they could talk. She is 14 (as she said almost 15), and is sort of a diva. So getting some dust on her did good for her. She had some issues, that were not of her doing, and not going to elaborate on them, so her doing something like that was good for her.

The excitement of them making something like that is a unique experience. The sight of their face lighting up is just amazing. I swear I have NEVER shown someone how to make a pen, or made one with them, that they were not proud and showed it off to everyone they could.

Most of us didn't make our first pen until we were older (at least I am assuming that). Think of the joy and pride you had making your first one. . . Now just picture experiencing that at 10 years old.

Kaitlyn (14 year old) she finished 2nd in the teen contest, and she uses the pen she made daily, if she doesn't need to, she finds a reason. She skipped, when I took her home, to her mother to show her the finished pen.

Marley (9 years old) had to show her grandparents, and Uncle, and so on. She got excited when she found out she could bring it to school to show her teacher and friends. She was all kinds of thrilled showing her art teacher.

These are some of the reasons that the youth turners contest are the most important of the Bash.

Please let me know your thoughts on this....
 
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Edgar

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Well said, Ed.

I have helped my granddaughter make a few pens and she placed 2nd in a youth contest a couple of years ago. It was some fun bonding time & she was really proud of her accomplishments.
 

lyonsacc

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I fully agree Ed.
Although the "shop" is almost always open for the kids, it seems the contests are the thing that provides that little extra motivation that is sometimes needed for them (or me) to get them making stuff.
Some of my best life memories are working with my Dad on a woodworking project, or watching a neighbor making a wood sculpture.
 

mark james

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Your comments are excellent, and I also have had the same experience with working with kids.

I fully believe that the Youth contests should be some of the MOST supported contests - for the exact reasons you relay: Its about the KIDS; not US. We need less adult "Chest-Thumping" and "Self-Promotion" and more concern that the next generation will experience pride in accomplishments. The enjoyment of winning an Adult Contest is commendable; the enjoyment of mentoring a child/youth is of a much higher value (My opinion only).

I say this only as the inclusion of the Youth Contests has at times been debated, sadly.

Ed, It's a pleasure to read about you, Marley and her friend - Well done Dad.
 

EBorraga

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I always enjoy helping as many people as I can. I'm in the process of moving and had to get rid of some of my turning stuff. I gave my lathe to a young man that was interested in learning to turn pens. His father is a woodworker, but not familiar with pens. I also gave him tons of blanks and kits. He sent me a picture yesterday of his first pen. Nothing fantastic, but it's a start. And the youth is the future of this hobby.
 

edicehouse

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I fully agree Ed.
Although the "shop" is almost always open for the kids, it seems the contests are the thing that provides that little extra motivation that is sometimes needed for them (or me) to get them making stuff.
Some of my best life memories are working with my Dad on a woodworking project, or watching a neighbor making a wood sculpture.
I remember being 10 or so, working the palm sander on something my grandfather making. I was complaining about I've been sanding for 15 minutes it's smooth enough. Of course it wasn't and I realize that now. I would give anything for 15 more minutes sanding with him talking to me..... Yep as stated memories.

But are the memories more "ours" or "theirs"?
 

mark james

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I fully agree Ed.
Although the "shop" is almost always open for the kids, it seems the contests are the thing that provides that little extra motivation that is sometimes needed for them (or me) to get them making stuff.
Some of my best life memories are working with my Dad on a woodworking project, or watching a neighbor making a wood sculpture.
I remember being 10 or so, working the palm sander on something my grandfather making. I was complaining about I've been sanding for 15 minutes it's smooth enough. Of course it wasn't and I realize that now. I would give anything for 15 more minutes sanding with him talking to me..... Yep as stated memories.

But are the memories more "ours" or "theirs"?
Ed, Just as you now wish you had more time with "Grandpa," but did not think that at the time - Marley is going through the same process. She enjoyed the time, loves her pen, but the real memory will come down the road.

My Mom passed away last month. At the family memorial service many stories were told. Most relatives (14 left, her bottles' vintage) related memories, both the pleasant and the struggles, but all very important to each person.

I've also been spending a lot of time with my In-Laws (93 yrs old both). I white water kayaked with my FIL - I was 28, he was 62. Both of us share many memories. But at age 28, I did not realize the close relationship I was developing, or the memories to come back to 31 years later.

Enjoy and cherish the ride. That shop is more valuable/meaningful than just making pens. Much more is going on.

Again, well done Dad!
 
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