Question about terminology

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Silverman

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Nov 8, 2019
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Hello, friends. I feel som confusing in understanding terminlogy like ACRYLIC PEN BLANK. On the market we can buy 3 main types of TRANSPARENT casting resins:
1. Epoxy resins
2. Poly-Ether resins
3. Polyurethane resin (like Alumilite brand)
But i am constantly see in sales - almost all of the blanks sells under the name "ACRYLIC PEN BLANK" or "ACRYLIC ACETATE PEN BLANK". But i suspect, that what people mean under their ACRYLIC it is not the same what actual meaning of ACRYLIC as PMMA. I try to search - how to cast ACRYLIC nlanks - no clear answer, no supplier, no links. Is it true, that ACRYLIC used as synonim to RESIN? If so - this is not correct, or i am missing something important?
 
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hokie

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May 29, 2017
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I think this post from a couple of years ago may help explain the differences...

The word "acrylic" is indeed used way too much for any sort of plastic blank.
 

Bob F

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Feb 26, 2018
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Thornton ,Colorado
epoxy blanks - PR blanks and urathane blanks (alumilite clear and clear slow ) are not acrylics they are different formulations of resins that make up different plastics . - It is a pet peive of us blank makers that have been doing this for years to see epoxy - PR or urathane resins referred to as acrylics --as they are NOT
 

magpens

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@Silverman

Antony, you are right ! . The term "acrylic" frequently gets incorrectly used when referring to any pen blanks that are not wood and not metal.

Keeping track of, and remembering, the correct names for plastic-like materials is challenging, perhaps even for a materials scientist.

Also, the word "alumilite" is often misused in referring to materials that are different from, but similar to, the "Alumilite" brand name products.

In fact, digging deeper than usual, we may also find that the word "epoxy" might have other meanings than the one we usually intend.

When it really matters it does not hurt to ask for clarification. . Perhaps some languages other than English have similar "problems".
 

Silverman

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Nov 8, 2019
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Russia
I am just can be happy, i am not alone in this world, who was thinking - it is ridiculous to name ACRYLIC to any casting liquid substance :) To call it it just PLASTIC or even POLYMERIC - more suitable. Thank you friends for confirmation this fact. Also, while i support with respect the main message by magpens about similar situations in other languages, i am still stick at the idea - that main/primary component still goes (or at least - have to) on top in the product series or product type. Also when process of processing this blanks goes deeper - all the nuances start playing their own role, depending on the actual chemistry of the processing material. Also buyers need to be informed or even have a right to know truth about one thing - what is hidden behind the name of ACRYLIC PEN BLANK :) Based on the past experience, a buyer/person can buy penblanks with the same name from two different suppliers - but with completely different chemical composition and properties. Guess what? He can get a completely different results. And yet I believe that this is dishonest and wrong - but I got the answer to the question that tormented me for so long time )))
 

Silverman

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Nov 8, 2019
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Russia
The next question is about actual and real CASTING ACRYLIC. As i look to the forum's library - i think there is no info about this subject. Searching in web also not very informative, only some information about using this kind of resins in dentist prosthetics.
 

magpens

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@Silverman
Based on the past experience, a buyer/person can buy penblanks with the same name from two different suppliers - but with completely different chemical composition and properties. Guess what? He can get a completely different results. And yet I believe that this is dishonest and wrong - but I got the answer to the question that tormented me for so long time )))
I don't think there would ever be a deliberate attempt at dishonesty. . However, I do get your point. . Some vendors, themselves, may not be totally sure of the complete composition details of the products they sell, even though, as you say, those details can affect the turned results.

Your best bet is to ask a general question on this forum about any material that you are not sure about. . I am certain that you will get answers.
There aren't that many vendors; someone here will surely have tried the product you are interested in. . Of course, ask the vendor too.

It is also true to say that once you start turning a material on the lathe you can adjust the lathe speed (and other cutting parameters) to get satisfactory results once you have a little bit of experience with the turning process.
 
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