Options on repairing a chip on top edge of a tool post

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1shootist

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It a 8" and has a chip right on the top edge where the cutting tool slides across...not huge though large enough that the tool bar hangs up on it much more often than not. I thought about using JB Weld but wanted to ask if anyone here has had this before and repaired it successfully .
Thanks !
 
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leehljp

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Do you have a welder friend that you can call on? Shouldn't take a minute to fill in and a couple of minutes to file down.

Where did that tool post come from? That is a defect and should be covered. That should not have been sold like that - a quality control issue.
 

magpens

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You put this inquiry in the "Metal Lathes" forum ... but your tool rest does not look like it is on a "metal lathe" ... puzzled me at first. LOL !
I read your original post ... and was going to ask you to give us pictures ... which you did later ... so now I know it's a wood lathe.

That looks like a "brand new" tool rest, and I see that you joined IAP only a few months ago. . So maybe you have bought the lathe only recently.
(Or maybe you have recently painted the tool rest that lovely blue color !!!)

I agree with someone above who suggested that this flaw should be addressed by the seller of the lathe. . Take it back for replacement.
 
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jttheclockman

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Did you paint it blue?? Because it has blue paint in the chip so that would be a defect. You are not telling us the whole story. Can you turn it around?? Looks like a square piece with the post in the middle.
 

Curly

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It’s cast iron. Easy to file and I don’t think it would take 15 minutes start to finish. Epoxy might work but you might find the tool drags a bit over it. You can always file it if the filler doesn’t work. As the rest have said, if it’s on warranty see if they will exchange it.
 

1shootist

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Yes it's brandnew...or was..I tried to file it down while waiting for the warranty replacement post to arrive so it doesn't look quite this nice any longer. I didn't make very good progress doing so.

The warranty replacement co. did not want it returned.

I just hate throwing this away if I can repair it to use on my other wood lathe...it has a 6" this is an 8"..I am going to need to make or maybe buy if I must a 5/8 to 1" adapter though.

I didn't realize I was still in the metal lathe forum , my fault ..I thought I'd gotten out. I had been searching for this topic .

I was wondering myself if jb weld would make the area drag...I was hoping someone may have tried it and could tell me before I go that route.

No such luck on having a buddy with a welder.
 

TonyL

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This may be a dumb solution: I would try several layers of 2 part epoxy - the slow cure type (24 hours to full cure). Then I would try sanding it to match the profile of the rest (of the rest :)).
What is it length (rest) and post diameter. I don't use these. I will send you one. Sorry, I just read your entire post which included the specs.
 

monophoto

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You have addressed the fundamental issue - this was a defective tool rest and the supplier is replacing it.

But I'm a string saver, and I would also look for a way to get some use out of this rest. Most of the good ideas have already been mentioned:
  • file off the top of the rest. Because it's cast iron, that won't be very difficult, but keeping the top flat along the full width would take effort. Using a belt sander or large disc sander might simplify the task.
  • cut off the defective portion to make a shorter rest. It looks like the nick is within an inch or so of the post, so that means you would either have a very short tool rest (which actually could be quite useful), or else an asymmetrical tool rest (probably less useful. It appears that the nick is on the right side of the post, meaning that cutting off the damaged portion would leave the rest offset to the left of the post - I would think that an offset to the right of the post would be more useful).
  • if you have the skills and equipment, or if you have friends who do, you could purchase a length of hard steel tool rod that you weld or braze to the top of the tool rest. While more work, this would be a great solution because the resulting rest would be far superior to the original configuration; solid cast iron tool rests are fine, but they will collect nicks along the top edge that need to be periodically filed out. Having a hardened steel rod along the edge prevents most serious nicks and results in better tool control.
 

randyrls

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I would remove the blue paint from the edges where the tool may contact the tool rest. Power sand coarse grit then fine grit with whatever sander you have Disc sander, Belt sander, wire wheel. Make sure the edge remains straight, and don't make a sharp edge on the tool rest. Even a coarse sandpaper on a sanding block could work. Cast Iron needs to be smooth. Some actually apply polish to the tool rest. Rick Herrell tool rests are awesome!
 

leehljp

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One other suggestion/option to weigh in on is this: Clean it out the spot with a strong wire brush or with an angle grinder with wire wheel. Get a 1/16" brass rod and a bernzomatic torch with Map gas and braze it. The brass will not be quite as hard as the steel but it will be much more hard than epoxy putty-JBWeld. File it down and the lathe chisels will glide across it without a problem

I think the butane/bernzomatic torches with map gas can braze with a 1/16' brass rod.
 

Dieseldoc

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Cast iron post alway will show sign of ware and nicks. So best opt is to be, to sand it smooth and use it up. Also think about getting Rick Herrell member to make you a great tool rest and post.
 

1shootist

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This may be a dumb solution: I would try several layers of 2 part epoxy - the slow cure type (24 hours to full cure). Then I would try sanding it to match the profile of the rest (of the rest :)).
What is it length (rest) and post diameter. I don't use these. I will send you one. Sorry, I just read your entire post which included the specs.
I appreciate you even considering to do that sir !
I've been looking at various different tool posts to upgrade to eventually, I'd like a smoother area for the tool to slide and I really like the looks of the modular chrome bar type.
Thanks again.
 

TonyL

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I own about 8 of rick Herrell's. They are tough to beat on my opinion. Still happy to send you one. Just pm address if you want. These are not used. They are the ones that came with my lathe. I rather someone use it than discard.
 
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