Omaha Beach - Who Can Comprehend The Magnitude of This ?

Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad
Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad

Woodchipper

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,461
Location
Cleveland, TN
My father and I were watching films of the invasion on Omaha Beach. My cousin was a sniper who went in on the first wave. There was one scene that caught my fahter's attention. Four GIs are carrying a stretcher with a guy on the stretcher, up on one elbow and facing the camera. The guy had a little pencil mustache. My cousin was wounded! My father insisted that was my cousin! If you could see photos of the men in my father's family...they all looked alike. Going through family photos confirms this. We shall never forget!
 

greenacres2

Member
Joined
May 2, 2017
Messages
887
Location
Northwest IN
I could only imagine, except that i can't imagine. Churchill said it well...Never have so few given so much for so many. and it was way beyond a "few".
My thanks to all who serve(d), and for prices paid.
earl
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2017
Messages
655
Location
Wolf Creek Montana
I was at the American Cemetery on the 55th anniversary of D day. Very sobering experience. My wife and I walked on the beach and I collected some sand. There were a few veterans there that had stormed Omaha beach. I heard several of them comment about how it had all changed. I wish now I had talked to them. There are less than 500,000 WWII veterans alive today. At the current death rate in 5 years they will all be gone. That will be a very sad day.
 

Woodchipper

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,461
Location
Cleveland, TN
Churchill was referring to the RAF- Never have so many owed so much to so few. This was because of the bravery and sacrifices during what is now called The Battle of Britain. There were a number of Americans who flew with the RAF. We are losing WWII veterans too fast. If you saw the series, Band of Brothers, my cousin sent an email about the death of Shifty Powers a few years ago. Please recall that was called The Greatest Generation! Proud to have called one Dad for 55 years; 13th Air Force, Flight Engineer for C-47s, PTO. Dang, must have a roof leak!
wolf creek knives, veterans said the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan was the most realistic film ever made about the invasion. They also said they hoped it never happen again.
 

studioseven

Member
Joined
May 6, 2014
Messages
340
Location
Wisconsin
My Dad was in the Army Air Corp stationed in England during the war. Sadly he passed away a few years ago. I truly regret never asking about his experiences over there. I have so many questions that can never be answered. So if you have a relative who is a veteran, don't make my mistake. Go and talk with them and let them share their experiences.

Seven
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2017
Messages
655
Location
Wolf Creek Montana
Churchill was referring to the RAF- Never have so many owed so much to so few. This was because of the bravery and sacrifices during what is now called The Battle of Britain. There were a number of Americans who flew with the RAF. We are losing WWII veterans too fast. If you saw the series, Band of Brothers, my cousin sent an email about the death of Shifty Powers a few years ago. Please recall that was called The Greatest Generation! Proud to have called one Dad for 55 years; 13th Air Force, Flight Engineer for C-47s, PTO. Dang, must have a roof leak!
wolf creek knives, veterans said the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan was the most realistic film ever made about the invasion. They also said they hoped it never happen again.
I very much believe your last sentence. My father was in the submarine service during WWII. He told me only funny stories about his service but I always felt there was more to it. He passed in 1992, way too young. My father in law only talks to me about his Navy service. He was on the second wave of the Okinawa invasion. He's now 96 and still sharp as a tack. He gave me a 55cal bullet he found at one of the Japanese airports.
 
Last edited:

Woodchipper

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Messages
2,461
Location
Cleveland, TN
Seven, many won't talk about what they saw or experienced. My father only gave tiny bits and pieces. I'll relate two here. Once a group came back from a bombing mission. Can't remember the model of bomber. It took a round of flak in the tail. They pulled the bomber off the runway and hosed out the remains of the tail gunner. Dad and his buddies were in the chow line in the Philippines. All of a sudden there was a commotion in the mess tent! Dad and his buddies ran in to see what was going on. Said they wished they hadn't. A Japanese soldier sneaked into the mess tent to steal food. A Philippine mess boy recognized him as a Jap. Parted his hair with a meat cleaver. Dad lost his appetite.
I had a veteran in my church in KY who was on the front lines for 270 days. Can't imagine being in a combat zone for that length of time.
This is mild compared to some things I have read about WWII.
 

greenacres2

Member
Joined
May 2, 2017
Messages
887
Location
Northwest IN
Churchill was referring to the RAF- Never have so many owed so much to so few. This was because of the bravery and sacrifices during what is now called The Battle of Britain. There were a number of Americans who flew with the RAF. We are losing WWII veterans too fast. If you saw the series, Band of Brothers, my cousin sent an email about the death of Shifty Powers a few years ago. Please recall that was called The Greatest Generation! Proud to have called one Dad for 55 years; 13th Air Force, Flight Engineer for C-47s, PTO. Dang, must have a roof leak!
wolf creek knives, veterans said the opening scene of Saving Private Ryan was the most realistic film ever made about the invasion. They also said they hoped it never happen again.
Thanks, on every level.
earl
 

dogcatcher

Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2007
Messages
1,793
Location
TX, NM or on the road
Some WWII facts that may explain the lack of stories. There were about 16 million Americans that served in WWII, a little over 2 million served in the European Theater, the number in the Pacific was a little less than 2 million. Or basically about 4 million went overseas. Of those that did go overseas, you have all of the support troops, the cooks the mechanics, the supply clerks and thousands of others. Fact is, it takes 9 people to support one Infantryman. Those 9 people are as important as the 1 person on the frontline, because without them, we would have lost the war.
 
Last edited:

dogcatcher

Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2007
Messages
1,793
Location
TX, NM or on the road
Correct, dogcatcher. There were still 4 millon stories. Many were never told nor will be told.
Actually less than 4 million, quite a few of those were only there as support staff in rear areas far from the frontlines and the D Day invasion.

My grandfather was in WWI, he never left the state of Texas, but in WWII of 5 son-in-laws, 2 went to the Pacific, 1 to Europe, and 2 never left the states. I wasn't privy to those discussions until after I came home from Vietnam. I had known these men for over 21 years, but they never shared their war stories until I had been there and done that. 2 Marines, 2 Army, 1 Army Air Corp, the inter service rivalry was a riot in itself.
 

magpens

Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2011
Messages
9,985
Location
Coquitlam, BC, Canada
This is not about inter-service rivalry, this is about personal sacrifice and the consequent widespread experience of loss at a personal, family, community, state, and national level. . Just ponder for a few seconds those rows of white crosses. . Today is the day !
 

jeff_in_AZ

Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2013
Messages
108
Location
Chandler, AZ
Recently my brother put together a tribute to my great uncle, who was
killed in Normandy on D-Day. His name was Robert Foust from Hanfield, Indiana,
and he was a paratrooper with the 101st airborne. I've attached a copy if you
would like to read. Much of the story comes from my mother, who was 11 years
old at the time.
 

Attachments

Top Bottom