OB’s Shine Juice Fomulations

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Cwalker935

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I decided to do some testing on differing variations on OB’s Shine Juice. I tested the following variations:

#1 one part shellac, one part blo, one part, dna
#2 one part lacquer, one part blo, one part lacquer thinner
#3 one part lacquer, one part tung oil, one part lacquer thinner
#4 two parts lacquer, one part tung oil, one part lacquer thinner
#5 two parts lacquer, two parts tung oil, one part lacquer thinner

Ten applications each on cherry sanded to 400 grit at 2000 rpms

D0BF2AEA-DE4A-4AB5-A5A1-D1517355BFA9.jpeg


the shellac, boiled linseed oil, denatured alcohol combo produced the greatest shine and was a tad darker than the lacquer formulations. There was no noticeable differences in ease of application. I might play some more with shellac mixes.
 
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monophoto

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This is very helpful information - not seen anywhere else.

I agree that #1 is definitely darker than the other samples, but I also think #2 is very slightly darker than #3, #4, or #5. Not unexpected - shellac is more amber than lacquer, and BLO cures very slightly darker than Tung oil.

Have you thought about how you could test/compare these for durability? For pen makers, durability seems to be the big issue and the reason why shellac friction polishes are discouraged. My expectation (based more on emotion than fact) is that lacquer should be able to withstand the wear/tear associated with pens better than shellac, but it would be nice to see some concrete evidence to support that.
 

jttheclockman

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Oil tends to darken light colored woods to start with. Add shellac and you took it up a notch. So not surprising the first one is the darkest. Lacquer is clear.
 

egnald

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I have often thought about doing an experiment similar to yours, but using Shellac and Denatured Alcohol with different oils, Boiled Linseed, Tung, Walnut, and even mineral oil, but think about it is as far as I have ever gotten. - Dave
 

monophoto

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I have often thought about doing an experiment similar to yours, but using Shellac and Denatured Alcohol with different oils, Boiled Linseed, Tung, Walnut, and even mineral oil, but think about it is as far as I have ever gotten. - Dave
I understand - and I find that the more I think about it, the faster and more efficient the final process is if I ever get around to doing it. So procrastination is a good thing, right?
 

Cwalker935

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May 18, 2014
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Richmond, Va
This is very helpful information - not seen anywhere else.

I agree that #1 is definitely darker than the other samples, but I also think #2 is very slightly darker than #3, #4, or #5. Not unexpected - shellac is more amber than lacquer, and BLO cures very slightly darker than Tung oil.

Have you thought about how you could test/compare these for durability? For pen makers, durability seems to be the big issue and the reason why shellac friction polishes are discouraged. My expectation (based more on emotion than fact) is that lacquer should be able to withstand the wear/tear associated with pens better than shellac, but it would be nice to see some concrete evidence to support that.
I thought about just handling the test piece while watching TV to see how it held up. That would likely take longer than I could maintain interest.
 
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