Not sure if this is the right forum - Pecan Slab Question

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cdwrrtx

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Jul 30, 2018
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Round Rock, TX
If this is more suited for another forum, let me know...

I just acquired a Pecan Slab. Been drying in a metal barn/workshop for 3-4 years.
Looks to have been carved out with a chain saw. About 4" thick 60" long.
Not sure how to tackle this thing. Any help on what to look for or any treatment it should have? Should I cut it up as needed or try to do something with it as a whole?
 

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Woodchipper

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Mar 15, 2017
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The best suggestion is to send it to me.:wink:
I agree with 1080Wayne. There are a bunch of things that can be done with that slab of wood.
 

leehljp

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Think long and hard before you cut it up into smaller pieces. Later down the road you may wish you had used it for something large. Thick un-cracked/un-split dried slabs are hard to come by.

If you want to make a few pens with it, cut 6 to 8 inches off of the narrow end and that would make a bunch, and still save the slab for a nice table or for a bunch of bowls or vases.
 

philipff

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Put a belt sander to it and make a beautiful coffee table,or an Executive Desk. Just be aware that pecan is hard as concrete when dry- - -my experience.
 

cdwrrtx

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My skills and shop capabilities are limited right now to basically pen turning. I just couldn't pass this up. I got it from a family friend that probably had the intentions of a table or mantle, but never got around to it. He is now into brewing beer and is building a "brew plant" in his shop so he wanted this gone.

It would take a bit to get it to a finished product as a large piece. Both faces are pretty rough from the chainsaw and it is bowed a bit. But, work on the faces would still most likely leave over 2" of thickness.

I will take it slow and be frugal with any cutting. I understand the worth as a slab.
 

Dehn0045

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Mar 19, 2017
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Houston, Texas
I would consider flattening it with a hand plane (lots of youtube videos out there on this), sand and finish, and then slap some steel legs on it like these: www.amazon.com/Hairpin-Coffee-Tables-Modern-Stands/dp/B0748F5KYY/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1533828836&sr=8-2-spons&keywords=hairpin+table+legs&th=1

It looks like it could make a nice entry way table or sofa table. If you get sick of it you can always take the legs off of it and do something else when you have more time/tools/shop space/etc.
 

gr8macbeth

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Jun 19, 2018
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San Antonio Texas
If you want to smooth it for a table, but don’t have the big tools, you can always make a jig and use your router to smooth it out. The jig is simple to make and use. Pm me if you want and I will send you pictures and the plans for the one I made.
 

TG Design

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Jan 22, 2018
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Dayton, Oh
I would make a table or bench out of it. I had a similar piece of live edge walnut, it sat in the corner of my shop for years. I finally did something with it, I wish I had made this table years ago IMG_3246.JPG
 

donstephan

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Jul 24, 2016
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A router sled is in my opinion the approach to take to make the top and bottom flat, straight and parallel. If there is a significant bow(?) that would require wasting away a lot of the thickness to make flat, one could shorten the slab first.
 
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