New lathe, advice needed

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MedWoodWorx

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I decided that i need to upgrade my lathe into something with more potential. Can a fellow penturner please clarify if all small lathes have the same (universal) chuck? I understand that most models are sold with only a face plate attached or sometimes not even that. Can i attach a lets say pen blank chuck on any small lathe? I also understand that all the lathe tailstocks are either mk1 or 2, isn't it? Thank you in advance for your time, cheers
 
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Chriscb

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Ok - first things first. Most chucks screw into the lathe headstock, but I guess you may mean MT1 and MT2 - which refer to the taper in the hollow shaft running through headstock and tailstock. The thread size is critical for chucks - the range is vast but simply put M33 x 3.5 mm is typical for a large lathe, where as 1" x 8 tip is common for smaller machines. There are adapters which allow you to mount chucks on different sized threads. It may help to clarify your thinking if you give more information about your current machine.

Chriscb
 

monophoto

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The headstock spindle on modern lathes is almost always a hollow shaft. The various fixings used to hold work are attached to the lathe either by means of a female fitting that screws onto the male headstock spindle, or using a male taper that fits inside the female taper inside the headstock spindle. Faceplates and chucks typically have a female fixing that screws onto the male threading on the outside of the lathe spindle. Lathes typically come with a faceplate, but you will have to purchase a chuck as an accessory. Pen mandrels typically have a male Morse taper that fits into the female taper in the headstock spindle. Some accessories, such as bottle stopper mandrels, can be found with either form of mounting. So the specifications you need to ask about are the threading of the spindle, and the size of the taper inside the spindle

First the threading: most small to medium lathes today have a spindle with a 1"x8 threads-per-inch threading. There are still a few mini-lathes out there with 3/4"x16 threads-per-in threading, but those should be avoided since they are very small and it is hard to find accessories for them. Since you are in Europe, you will also find lathes with a 33mm thread. And of course so-called 'full size' lathes may have larger spindles - here in the us, larger lathes typically have 1.25x8tpi threading.

The inside of the spindle has a female taper that receives accessories that mount using a matching male taper. These tapers are termed 'Morse taper' , and there are standard specifications for Morse tapers that stipulate length and the the ratio of the larger diameter to the smaller diameter. Most mid-size lathes are MT-2. Those small mini-lathes mentioned above often have MT-1 tapers and should be avoided since its hard to find matching accessories. Larger lathes sometimes come with even larger MT-3 tapers. MT-2 is the most popular, and there are more accessories in this size than in either of the other sizes.

Incidentally, fixings that screw onto a male thread are usually quite secure on their own, but the male and female portions of a Morse taper attachment rely on friction to hold them together. If you are using tailstock support, it will prevent the male and female tapers from separating, but if you are not using tailstock support, you will need something called a 'drawbar' that is little more than a threaded rod that passes all the way through the headstock spindle, and screws into a threaded opening in the small end of the male taper. A nut is then placed on the left end of that rod, and when it it tightened, it pulls the taper into the spindle to prevent the two halves from separating. It is dangerous to use a Morse taper fixing without either tailstock support or a drawbar. The best source of drawbars is to make it yourself - all you need is a length of threaded rod (available from most hardware stores), and a matching nut. You can get fancy by turning a knob to fit on the nut to make it easier to tighten it when it is being used. You may also need a 'knockout bar' to release the taper when you are done - most lathes come with a knockout bar, and you may decide you need a utility mallet to encourage it in performing its task. That's another accessory that you can easily make after you get your lathe.
 
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Painfullyslow

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I decided that i need to upgrade my lathe into something with more potential. Can a fellow penturner please clarify if all small lathes have the same (universal) chuck? I understand that most models are sold with only a face plate attached or sometimes not even that. Can i attach a lets say pen blank chuck on any small lathe? I also understand that all the lathe tailstocks are either mk1 or 2, isn't it? Thank you in advance for your time, cheers

I just recently (last week) went through this process as well. When you say "small" lathe, what specifically did you have in mind? If you can let us know what you are looking at getting for a lathe perhaps someone can offer suggestions on chucks and other goodies for it?

Personally I went with the Rikon 70-150VS with a Nova G3 chuck. Rockler has a Nova starter package with almost everything that you will need to get started turning pens on whatever new lathe you get (assuming that it has a 1"x8 which almost all of the mini/midi lathes do).

All you need on top of that is a MT2 mandrel and I also got a jacobs tailstock chuck so that I can do drilling.

If you like I can go into the reasoning why I chose each of what I got.
 

penicillin

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You did not say whether you are looking at new, used, or both.

New lathes that I would call "small", "mini", or "midi" will have MT2 (Morse Taper 2) tapers in the headstock and tailstock. The MT2 tapers are used for pen mandrels and drive spurs in the headstock, and mandrel savers and live centers in the tailstock. Faceplates and chucks screw onto the headstock threads. The most common size for headstock threads is 1 inch x 8 TPI. It is hard to imagine any new lathe that you might buy that does not have MT2 tapers and 1x8 TPI headstock threads.

Large lathes may have larger headstock threads. A headstock thread size of 1-1/4 x 8 TPI is the common larger size.

Old lathes have a mix of different mounting methods. Headstock threads of 3/4 inch x 16 TPI may be found. Some really old lathes don't have tapers, and may use screw-on drive spurs (instead of taper fittings) and other specialty items that are specific to the lathe. Parts have long been discontinued for those lathes. Stay away from all of that. It would not be an "upgrade."

If I were looking at a used smallish lathe, I would not consider it unless it has MT2 tapers and 1x8 threads. I would also insist that the lathe come with a built-in electronic variable speed control. That's a must-have feature for me.
 

MedWoodWorx

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Thank you all for your advice. The mini lathe i use now is a proxxon wood lathe; i am considering to buy this one:


Specifications are below the model photo, cheers
 

Painfullyslow

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Thank you all for your advice. The mini lathe i use now is a proxxon wood lathe; i am considering to buy this one:


Specifications are below the model photo, cheers

The first thing that sticks out to me is the low speed on the lathe; 650rpm which for me is a bit high for applying CA glue, drilling, and finishing. Other than that, it looks like it should get the job done.

So that machine has a M33 headstock, meaning that you will need to find a chuck that also has that same thread. Something like this from that same manufacturer


If you want to drill your blanks on the lathe (I really recommend this) then you will also need a drill chuck


You will also need a mandrel to turn pens on but I do not see one offered by that company. Hope this helps!
 

farmer

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I would try to buy a used larger lathe then the one above .
A metal lathe is the only piece of machinery in the world that can reproduce it's self.
With a live cutter on the tool post a indexer and a taper bar you can make all kinds of inlays and segmented pens .
Taper bar will allow you to cut in points like a pool cue into your pens using a live cutter
Plus you can start to make kit less pens.
I prefer the 4 jaw chuck over a 3 jaw chuck
 

MedWoodWorx

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The first thing that sticks out to me is the low speed on the lathe; 650rpm which for me is a bit high for applying CA glue, drilling, and finishing. Other than that, it looks like it should get the job done.

So that machine has a M33 headstock, meaning that you will need to find a chuck that also has that same thread. Something like this from that same manufacturer


If you want to drill your blanks on the lathe (I really recommend this) then you will also need a drill chuck


You will also need a mandrel to turn pens on but I do not see one offered by that company. Hope this helps!
thank you for your advice,a m33 headstock can accomodate a pen chuck however isn't it? i suppose i need to find a specialised shop to buy such a part. Haven't thought about rpms though, what rate is low enough? cheers
 

greenacres2

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M-33 thread is pretty common, especially in Europe. Finding an M-33 chuck in Greece will likely be easier than the common USA sizes, so no worries there.
For small diameter turnings like pens, bottle stoppers and such…getting down to 250 RPMs should be good.
Good luck,
earl
 

MedWoodWorx

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M-33 thread is pretty common, especially in Europe. Finding an M-33 chuck in Greece will likely be easier than the common USA sizes, so no worries there.
For small diameter turnings like pens, bottle stoppers and such…getting down to 250 RPMs should be good.
Good luck,
earl
the thing is that i just checked my lathe's low speed and its 1000 rpm. I suppose that things would be easier with a lower speed but i ve managed to apply ca and drill holes in bud vases.
 

monophoto

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My reactions to the specifications for this lathe are:

Motor power - probably a bit on the light side. The specified continuous power rating of 500W translates roughly to 1/2 Hp - I would prefer to see a continuous rating closer to 1 Hp (1000 w).

Side note: the specification also mentions that the 'S6' rating for the motor is 700w. While this is interesting, my personal belief is that this is potentially misleading (just like Hp ratings on lawn mowers and other small engines - which is why they are no longer used, and engine displacement is used instead as the means of comparing machines). Under IEC standards, 'S6" is the peak rating of a motor when it is subjected to alternating periods of peak load following by equal duration periods of idle, no-load operation. So, in this instance, the motor is capable of developing 700 w of power for a period of X seconds provided it is then allowed to run at no load for a period of at least X seconds to cool down. Potentially the most severe duty that a lathe motor will see is during end-grain drilling, and it is true that a this is typically done intermittently. However, I know that when I stop drilling, I turn off the lathe - I don't allow it to continue to run for as long as I was drilling to cool down. Therefore, in my opinion, reliance on the S6 rating could lead to overloading/overheating of the motor.

Spindle thread: M33 is common in Europe. You should have no difficulty find accessories to fit. MT2 is very common.

Throw: 153mm - typical for a midi-lathe.

Distance between centers: 460mm is also typical. However, understand that in practice, you won't be able to use the full length - when you add a scroll chuck, and a jacobs chuck for drilling, you will lose 150mm, and probably more of this space. OK for pens and bowls, but you won't be able to do long spindles (eg, baseball bats). You might look into whether a bed extension is offered as an accessory.

Tailstock travel: 55mm - probably typical for a lathe of this size

Speed range: 650-3800 r/min. Also typical for lathes in this range. Some lathes in this category offer an undocumented ability to adjust the speed range slightly - there is no way to know from the specification if that applies to this machine.

Bottom line - not a bad lathe other than being a bit underpowered.
 
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leehljp

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I may have missed it above and if I did, I apologize.

However, what I did NOT see mentioned is in your tail stock, - IF you use a mandrel for pen making, you will need a 60° live center for the tail stock. I can see that the center in the tail stock on the machine pictured is made for "wood" turning. When using a MANDREL and or some specialized bushings, mandrels (which are metal) have a notch in the end that MUST be matched with a 60º CENTER, or 60° live center, as we usually say. The center in the tail stock that comes standard on the machine of your pictures is more pointed than a 60° center, and upon use over a few pens, the point will ball up or bend a very small amount, and then introduce a wobble into your pen blank turning.

1. Look for a 60° live center with an MT2 shaft.
2. It will be helpful in the long run to also find an MT2 60° Dead or Drive Center also.

Both of those items are VERY helpful in having a variety for turning blanks in different situations and needs.

Also, I have two lathes that do not go below 700 RPM, (well, one would not until I learned to alter the speed control to allow a lower range) and while maybe not ideal, I have had not problem with sanding or applying CA in the 17 years I have been making pens. It will work fine.

MANDRELS Note: There is a method called "TBC" or turning between centers, which allows one to skip the mandrel altogether. In general, it is as fast or faster than using a mandrel, uses much less parts, in general has less vibration or out of center turnings that are introduced with mandrels. Some people have no problems with mandrels and if so, that is good. However, at least half the problems by many - that are introduced by the mandrel - are solved with TBC. TBC works with 60°centers and the 60° centers work with customized bushings and commercial bushings.
 
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MedWoodWorx

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I may have missed it above and if I did, I apologize.

However, what I did NOT see mentioned is in your tail stock, - IF you use a mandrel for pen making, you will need a 60° live center for the tail stock. I can see that the center in the tail stock on the machine pictured is made for "wood" turning. When using a MANDREL and or some specialized bushings, mandrels (which are metal) have a notch in the end that MUST be matched with a 60º CENTER, or 60° live center, as we usually say. The center in the tail stock that comes standard on the machine of your pictures is more pointed than a 60° center, and upon use over a few pens, the point will ball up or bend a very small amount, and then introduce a wobble into your pen blank turning.

1. Look for a 60° live center with an MT2 shaft.
2. It will be helpful in the long run to also find an MT2 60° Dead or Drive Center also.

Both of those items are VERY helpful in having a variety for turning blanks in different situations and needs.

Also, I have two lathes that do not go below 700 RPM, (well, one would not until I learned to alter the speed control to allow a lower range) and while maybe not ideal, I have had not problem with sanding or applying CA in the 17 years I have been making pens. It will work fine.

MANDRELS Note: There is a method called "TBC" or turning between centers, which allows one to skip the mandrel altogether. In general, it is as fast or faster than using a mandrel, uses much less parts, in general has less vibration or out of center turnings that are introduced with mandrels. Some people have no problems with mandrels and if so, that is good. However, at least half the problems by many - that are introduced by the mandrel - are solved with TBC. TBC works with 60°centers and the 60° centers work with customized bushings and commercial bushings.
I see what you mean hank, thank you for mentioning this. I suppose that i could change the tailstock live center with one suitable for penturning. Yes i plan to start turning between centers; i cannot do that now with my mini lathe but with a proper lathe the sky is the limit, cheers.
 

MedWoodWorx

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My reactions to the specifications for this lathe are:

Motor power - probably a bit on the light side. The specified continuous power rating of 500W translates roughly to 1/2 Hp - I would prefer to see a continuous rating closer to 1 Hp (1000 w).

Side note: the specification also mentions that the 'S6' rating for the motor is 700w. While this is interesting, my personal belief is that this is potentially misleading (just like Hp ratings on lawn mowers and other small engines - which is why they are no longer used, and engine displacement is used instead as the means of comparing machines). Under IEC standards, 'S6" is the peak rating of a motor when it is subjected to alternating periods of peak load following by equal duration periods of idle, no-load operation. So, in this instance, the motor is capable of developing 700 w of power for a period of X seconds provided it is then allowed to run at no load for a period of at least X seconds to cool down. Potentially the most severe duty that a lathe motor will see is during end-grain drilling, and it is true that a this is typically done intermittently. However, I know that when I stop drilling, I turn off the lathe - I don't allow it to continue to run for as long as I was drilling to cool down. Therefore, in my opinion, reliance on the S6 rating could lead to overloading/overheating of the motor.

Spindle thread: M33 is common in Europe. You should have no difficulty find accessories to fit. MT2 is very common.

Throw: 153mm - typical for a midi-lathe.

Distance between centers: 460mm is also typical. However, understand that in practice, you won't be able to use the full length - when you add a scroll chuck, and a jacobs chuck for drilling, you will lose 150mm, and probably more of this space. OK for pens and bowls, but you won't be able to do long spindles (eg, baseball bats). You might look into whether a bed extension is offered as an accessory.

Tailstock travel: 55mm - probably typical for a lathe of this size

Speed range: 650-3800 r/min. Also typical for lathes in this range. Some lathes in this category offer an undocumented ability to adjust the speed range slightly - there is no way to know from the specification if that applies to this machine.

Bottom line - not a bad lathe other than being a bit underpowered.
I totally agree with you, to be frank a proper lathe costs about 1000 euros/dollars. A laguna is my dream lathe but at the moment i cannot afford it. I suppose a 1/2 hp lathe is good enough for penmaking and some small turnings like plates or small vases, isn't it?
 

RunnerVince

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M-33 thread is pretty common, especially in Europe. Finding an M-33 chuck in Greece will likely be easier than the common USA sizes, so no worries there.
For small diameter turnings like pens, bottle stoppers and such…getting down to 250 RPMs should be good.
Good luck,
earl
I typically apply CA with my lathe on the lowest speed of the high belt configuration...if I recall, it's around 1,600 RPM. The only issue I ever run into is spatter, but that's helped me to better judge the amount of glue I use and to keep my coats a uniform thickness. I've even applied it a few times at full speed (around 3,700 RPM) because I've forgotten to turn the speed down, and again, the only issue is the spatter if I use too much glue.
 

RunnerVince

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However, what I did NOT see mentioned is in your tail stock, - IF you use a mandrel for pen making, you will need a 60° live center for the tail stock. I can see that the center in the tail stock on the machine pictured is made for "wood" turning. When using a MANDREL and or some specialized bushings, mandrels (which are metal) have a notch in the end that MUST be matched with a 60º CENTER, or 60° live center, as we usually say. The center in the tail stock that comes standard on the machine of your pictures is more pointed than a 60° center, and upon use over a few pens, the point will ball up or bend a very small amount, and then introduce a wobble into your pen blank turning.
Slight caveat here. There are numerous mandrel saver systems where the mandrel goes through a specialized revolving center. Supposedly, this helps to apply all the pressure directly to the bushings and the workpiece so that you don't bend the mandrel by overtightening. So a 60° live center is not strictly necessary for all mandrels. I've only ever had these types of mandrels, and didn't have a great experience, but I can't say whether that's an issue with my specific mandrel, "mandrel saver" systems in general, or all mandrels. I switched to TBC as @leehljp suggests and have never looked back.

I now use my mandrel only for the rough turning on two-barrel pens with the same length for both barrels. I'll get them down close to size with a decent enough cut that I can see the grain patterns and decide which side will be the top, and which the bottom. Turning them at the same size helps me to visualize the final product, but in the end doesn't save me any steps. If my mandrel broke tomorrow, I would not replace it. I highly recommend skipping straight to a TBC setup.
 

MedWoodWorx

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I would try to buy a used larger lathe then the one above .
A metal lathe is the only piece of machinery in the world that can reproduce it's self.
With a live cutter on the tool post a indexer and a taper bar you can make all kinds of inlays and segmented pens .
Taper bar will allow you to cut in points like a pool cue into your pens using a live cutter
Plus you can start to make kit less pens.
I prefer the 4 jaw chuck over a 3 jaw chuck
i am not a big fan of used machinery, the thing is that i live in a small town where i cannot get dependable service. loading the lathe and driving it to a specialised technician is also difficult for me.
 

farmer

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i am not a big fan of used machinery, the thing is that i live in a small town where i cannot get dependable service. loading the lathe and driving it to a specialised technician is also difficult for me.

Most lathes you fix were they are being used , Your the mechanic or the electrician.
In allot of cases the older Iron is better then the new stuff at a fraction of the cost and most the time you get a bunch of accessories that normally have to buy as extras .
Especially if your buying older quality machinery compared to new cheap China made machinery.
I can understand that you don't know lathes and never been around a machine shop or metal lathes that have been converted to make wooden products
I own a complete machine shop , If i was going to buy a lathe and make segmented inlayed kitless pens then it would be a metal lathe .
Good luck and have fun
 

leehljp

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Slight caveat here. There are numerous mandrel saver systems where the mandrel goes through a specialized revolving center. Supposedly, this helps to apply all the pressure directly to the bushings and the workpiece so that you don't bend the mandrel by overtightening. So a 60° live center is not strictly necessary for all mandrels. I've only ever had these types of mandrels, and didn't have a great experience, but I can't say whether that's an issue with my specific mandrel, "mandrel saver" systems in general, or all mandrels. I switched to TBC as @leehljp suggests and have never looked back.

I now use my mandrel only for the rough turning on two-barrel pens with the same length for both barrels. I'll get them down close to size with a decent enough cut that I can see the grain patterns and decide which side will be the top, and which the bottom. Turning them at the same size helps me to visualize the final product, but in the end doesn't save me any steps. If my mandrel broke tomorrow, I would not replace it. I highly recommend skipping straight to a TBC setup.
You are correct. TBC came about 4 years into my pen turning, and then the mandrel saver didn't come along for another 5 to 6 years. By that time, I was too intrenched into TBC. Even since then mandrel savers have undergone a morphing of sorts, as the quality ones came about in the last 2 to 3 years, maybe last 4 years. The earlier ones worked ok but there still were enough problems with them, which were similar to the problems of mandrels. Woodpecker's is expensive but excellent; Whiteside mandrel saver is reasonably priced and it has Whiteside's quality, which is excellent also.
 

RunnerVince

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You are correct. TBC came about 4 years into my pen turning, and then the mandrel saver didn't come along for another 5 to 6 years. By that time, I was too intrenched into TBC. Even since then mandrel savers have undergone a morphing of sorts, as the quality ones came about in the last 2 to 3 years, maybe last 4 years. The earlier ones worked ok but there still were enough problems with them, which were similar to the problems of mandrels. Woodpecker's is expensive but excellent; Whiteside mandrel saver is reasonably priced and it has Whiteside's quality, which is excellent also.
Sometimes it's good to get a reminder that there are some nicer things than what you can get from PSI or Craft Supplies. I will have to look into the two you mention for the times when my sons or nephews/nieces want to do a pen.
 

leehljp

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Sometimes it's good to get a reminder that there are some nicer things than what you can get from PSI or Craft Supplies. I will have to look into the two you mention for the times when my sons or nephews/nieces want to do a pen.
Woodpeckers mandrel system: (sit down before you look at the price) https://www.woodpeck.com/ultra-shear-pen-mandrel-system.html

Whiteside: https://www.woodcraft.com/products/...MI48u-9sLT9wIVWW5vBB1VLAk0EAAYAiAAEgLv6fD_BwE
Whiteside does not paint theirs or polish their router bits or other machined products, but they are top notch in precision.
 

jrista

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I totally agree with you, to be frank a proper lathe costs about 1000 euros/dollars. A laguna is my dream lathe but at the moment i cannot afford it. I suppose a 1/2 hp lathe is good enough for penmaking and some small turnings like plates or small vases, isn't it?
Laguna was my dream lathe as well. Bought a Laguna Revo 1524...honestly haven't regretted anything so much in the last decade and a half or so of my life... The tailstock/quill design on the 1524 is utterly atrocious. Not good enough for pens, not good enough for anything IMO. PrecisePoint, the name of their tailstock design, should be tossed in a raging furnace and forgotten forever.

I've been through several brands of lathes now. I finally settled on a PowerMatic. Wish I'd just bit the bullet and started there...would have saved me so much hassle and regret! I wanted to save money with the Laguna...but, sometimes, spending a bit more money is well worth it in the end. The difference is incomparable. I was totally hooked on the PWM drive of the Laguna, but in practice, the way that power feels through the blank to the tool, is very different from other lathes. The PWM is stepped, so it just changes how power works...its not continuous, and it can jump suddenly, and often for unexpected reasons. If you intend to buy a Laguna, I STRONGLY recommend you try one out for a while first, and make sure the way its power changes and transfers to the blank and the tool is something you can handle. It can be very jarring at times.

Anyway...you can do better than a Laguna, IMO. Much, much better! Just thought I'd offer my thought there, given my experience. 🤷‍♂️ FWIW, I don't think the Laguna 1216 has PrecisePoint (I'd verify before you buy, though!!), so you may not have that particular issue...but, my issues with the 1524 were many...

As for power, because of the Laguna issues (I bought it in Dec. 2020, started using it in Jan. 2021, had problems by spring), I ended up spending most of my time on a Wen 1420 lathe. That is a 6A 120V lathe, which I think comes out to about 1/2 HP as well. I've turned a lot of stuff on it. Small vases, some small bowls, small platters, as well as a plethora of pens. I think I turned a 8 or 9 inch platter on it, and it handled it well enough. So a small half horsepower lathe should certainly do the trick! I think for bowls and stuff up to 6-7 inches, you will probably be fine.
 

MedWoodWorx

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MedWoodWorx

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Laguna was my dream lathe as well. Bought a Laguna Revo 1524...honestly haven't regretted anything so much in the last decade and a half or so of my life... The tailstock/quill design on the 1524 is utterly atrocious. Not good enough for pens, not good enough for anything IMO. PrecisePoint, the name of their tailstock design, should be tossed in a raging furnace and forgotten forever.

I've been through several brands of lathes now. I finally settled on a PowerMatic. Wish I'd just bit the bullet and started there...would have saved me so much hassle and regret! I wanted to save money with the Laguna...but, sometimes, spending a bit more money is well worth it in the end. The difference is incomparable. I was totally hooked on the PWM drive of the Laguna, but in practice, the way that power feels through the blank to the tool, is very different from other lathes. The PWM is stepped, so it just changes how power works...its not continuous, and it can jump suddenly, and often for unexpected reasons. If you intend to buy a Laguna, I STRONGLY recommend you try one out for a while first, and make sure the way its power changes and transfers to the blank and the tool is something you can handle. It can be very jarring at times.

Anyway...you can do better than a Laguna, IMO. Much, much better! Just thought I'd offer my thought there, given my experience. 🤷‍♂️ FWIW, I don't think the Laguna 1216 has PrecisePoint (I'd verify before you buy, though!!), so you may not have that particular issue...but, my issues with the 1524 were many...

As for power, because of the Laguna issues (I bought it in Dec. 2020, started using it in Jan. 2021, had problems by spring), I ended up spending most of my time on a Wen 1420 lathe. That is a 6A 120V lathe, which I think comes out to about 1/2 HP as well. I've turned a lot of stuff on it. Small vases, some small bowls, small platters, as well as a plethora of pens. I think I turned a 8 or 9 inch platter on it, and it handled it well enough. So a small half horsepower lathe should certainly do the trick! I think for bowls and stuff up to 6-7 inches, you will probably be fine.
Ok then, i should untick the laguna lathe from my bucket list. Anyway i ll move to a midi lathe and when time comes i ll see the next step.
 

jrista

Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2021
Messages
998
Location
Colorado
Woodpeckers mandrel system: (sit down before you look at the price) https://www.woodpeck.com/ultra-shear-pen-mandrel-system.html

Whiteside: https://www.woodcraft.com/products/...MI48u-9sLT9wIVWW5vBB1VLAk0EAAYAiAAEgLv6fD_BwE
Whiteside does not paint theirs or polish their router bits or other machined products, but they are top notch in precision.
That woodpecker mandrel is something else...

There are times when TBC, unless you just go strait caliper measurements (I don't feel I'm accurate enough to do that consistently, without overshooting some times), is not always possible for all pen kits. The Euro, slimlines of course, and some others require a mandrel. I've had three different ones, and none of them measure up. If it is the kind of thing that could last for a lifetime, the woodpecker mandrel might just be worth it...
 
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