Need your opinions

Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad
Status
Not open for further replies.

C. Scott

Active Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2004
Messages
184
Location
Alvin, Texas, USA.
These are the first pens for 2005. The first photo shows Arizona Ash and Curly Maple. The second shows Mesquite, Osage Orange and Walnut. The Mesquite came from a firewood seller and the pic just doesn't do it justice and the Osage Orange is from a neighbor who said the log was at least 50 years old. Talk about hard to turn. The Ash comes from a tree in my parents' yard and the walnut and maple come from Rockler.

Give me the unvarnished truth. What can I improve on (other than the photography!) I really would like to take my pens to the next level.
















Thanks for looking!

C. Scott :)
 
Signed-In Members Don't See This Ad

tipusnr

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2004
Messages
1,692
Location
Reynoldsburg, OH, USA.
I think you have it down really well. You might try laminations or gluing contrasting/coordinating bands to your pens if you want more variety. I can't tell if the kit your using will allow it or not but making your own centerbands is always fun as well.
 

PenWorks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2004
Messages
5,190
Location
Scottsdale, AZ
I don't know Scott, once you get past the lousy pictures [:D] The pens look really nice. The wood you have choosen has some figure to it and looks goood. I like them all. The picture thing though. Sometimes it harder to take the picture , than make the pen [:D] Anthony
 

Fred in NC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Messages
1,887
Location
LANDIS, NC, USA.
Chris, you want the truth unvarnished, so I got my sandpaper...

Ok, the pens look real nice! I have not found much I can change in the cigar pens, excepting like said above, laminations etc. My cigar pens look a lot like yours. Nicest looking one I have made, in my opinion and that of the guy who bought it, was made of blackwood with a gold kit.

About the photography, I cannot say much because I am really not set up very well myself. The background is dark and blends in too much.

Looking at your photo album, I find more cigar pens there. Have you tried other types of kits?

Anyway, your pens look great.
 

C. Scott

Active Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2004
Messages
184
Location
Alvin, Texas, USA.
Bill,

I have wanted to try some laminations, I've got enough little scraps now that I can do it. [;)] I'm just going to have to break down and do it. [:)]

Anthony,

This picture thing has kinda got me mad at myself. Let's put it this way. I am a way better photographer than a turner, but macro photography isn't my bag. Another problem is I am a film guy not a digital guy. My b-i-l just gave me his "old" Sony MVC CD300 with a Ziess lens (he got a nicer one for Christmas). I just can't get it to work like my Minolta 35mm. I tried running them through my scanner, but I wasn't pleased with the color. I'm not thrilled with the color on the digital for that matter, BUT it is convenient. I will give it another try using outdoor light and use the tripod.

Thanks!

Chris
 

Tom McMillan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2004
Messages
1,598
Location
Washougal, WA, USA.
Very nice Chris---Excellent in fact!!!! Looks like you've got cigar pens accomplished. I enjoy doing slimlines---but, don't really turn them slim---I like a variation with it. I'm just getting to a couple fountain pens now---a designer and an El Grande and hope to get a Baron to try too. Lots out there to try---just depends what your preferences are.
 

C. Scott

Active Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2004
Messages
184
Location
Alvin, Texas, USA.
Thanks for the complements. Up until a month and half ago all I made was the European (with my firsts being the slimlines). I have sold several Euros. However, I have just fallen for the Cigar and it seems to get more notice than the Euros. I plan to continue to make the Euros I just don't have any made right now. I've got five waiting to be built. [;)]

Regards,

Chris
 

vick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Messages
1,452
Location
Gilbert, AZ, USA.
I am far from an expert but I feal the most inportant thing in making pens besides percision is the materials you use. You might be suprised how different it is turning burls, angle cut, and cross cut woods as well as working with plastics. After that maybe finishing experementation and custom wood bands. The pens look great to me and if it makes you feal better my pictures are 10 times worse. All I have is a cheapy digital camera that was a free gift.
 

Gary Max

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Messages
6,231
Location
Southern Kentucky
I am going to tell you the same thing I am telling myself.
It's time to try some different kits.
Right now I build slimlines cigar's and Patriot.
I am sitting around waiting on that GREAT Sale---ain't selling alot of pens right now anyhow.
Just my little thought.
 

PenWorks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2004
Messages
5,190
Location
Scottsdale, AZ
Chris, look in waynes photo album, he has made a homemade picture booth with a lamp shade and stuff you probablly have lying around. Photography is all about getting the light right on these little things.But I still think your a better turner than photographer LOL, Anthony
 

wayneis

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Messages
1,950
Location
Okemos, Michigan, USA.
With macro Photography a tripod is a must for clear photos. Like Anthony said go to my album and look at my setup, I use a Copy Stand that I bought off ebay from someone that makes them. I paid fifty bucks for mine but if you were to get into one of the fancy jobs it can get into several hundred dollars. Another way is to attach an arm to a tripod so that you can shoot directly down or at least a small angle. The other important factor is light and lots of it.

Wayne
 
G

Guest

Guest
Give me the unvarnished truth. What can I improve on (other than the photography!) I really would like to take my pens to the next level.

What is your definition of the "next level"?
Sometimes it is hard to leave where you are at if you don't know where you want to go.
I look at your pens and see nice wood pens.Are you looking to go to another level so you can sell more pens?
I am speaking from my own experience in turning.
I see no challenge in making a pen that looks like the ones in the cataologues.You can modify the shape of the cigar,but if they don't sell what is the benifit?
 

Fred in NC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Messages
1,887
Location
LANDIS, NC, USA.
My personal impression is that <b>some</b> kits lend themselves to modifications and some are limited in what you can do with them. Slimlines are the most modifiable and versatile kits, in my opinion. Also my best seller, probably because of the price. Most of my slimlines are modified one way or the other, I don't make them straight and skinny. Never did!

I totally agree that there is no challenge in making a pen that looks just like the ones in the catalogs. I love the challenge of coming up with something different.

From <b>most</b> buyers' perspective, (again in my opinion) a wood pen or for that matter an OldJeanMascus is very different from what they are used to seeing, even if the shape is standard. A nicely finished cigar pen in a nice wood ("Montecristo" in my book) sells well for me at a decent price.

The tinkerer in me will keep experimenting, however. That is my nature!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom