My first 2 pens

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Mike6453

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Joined
Feb 18, 2019
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9
Location
Hoover, Alabama
Here are my first two pens -- Cocobolo and Honduran Rosewood. Learning how to shape the pen is going to be a challenge, but I think both turned out ok (shape-wise). They both feel good in my hand at least. The finish on both is 2 parts shellac; 1 part BLO; 1 part DNA -- 3-4 coats each. I've learned a lot so far just reading this forum. Thanks to all who help educate the newbies!
 

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leehljp

Member Liaison
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
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6,684
Location
Tunica, MS,
Here are my first two pens -- Cocobolo and Honduran Rosewood. Learning how to shape the pen is going to be a challenge, but I think both turned out ok (shape-wise). They both feel good in my hand at least. The finish on both is 2 parts shellac; 1 part BLO; 1 part DNA -- 3-4 coats each. I've learned a lot so far just reading this forum. Thanks to all who help educate the newbies!
You did very well for the first two! Looks great!

Unless there is a background on turning such as bowls and spindles, there is an tiny bit of apprehension of taking off too much and getting down to perfect size and shape. I have seen this countless times and remember my first several - and the hesitation once I got close.

Finish was elusive also, so after my first 5 - 10 pens, (long time ago) I took a 2x4 pine cut-off and made pine blanks and spent a day practice turning, shaping as close as I could to the fittings and learning how to use CA so that a good finish was repetitive.

A Tip: I don't know if you have calipers, but get a good set of calipers and measure your turnings to fit the nib end, center band and clip end.
 

OZturner

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Joined
Aug 5, 2013
Messages
6,620
Location
Sydney. NSW. Australia
Nice Pens Mike,
Though a bit hard to see the detail,
As well as the good advice give by Hank, I suggest that you Photograph, with a lighter, less textured back ground, as the Timber background, colour drowns out the Pens, while the Texture of the Background draws your eye's away from the Pens, the Object of Photograph. Also a little closer with the Camera would also help.
From what I can see, Beautiful Blanks, Nicely Turned.
I look forward to seeing some of your future Pens,
Congratulations,
Brian.
 
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Mike1950

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2018
Messages
2
Location
Stickney
Hi Mike. I c. Insider myself a newbie as well. Been turning pens an other things for about a year now. I appreciate the concern about the shape aspect. My first few pens looked more like mini rolling pens. I finally talked with a lady who wanted a seam ripper(I’m not proud I’ll make anything). She has arthritis in her hands and I ask her what shape was important to her. I took notes and we drew up a tentative shape and properties. Needless to say she was thrilled when I delivered her custom ripper. She has since ordered pens and rippers as gifts which has lead to her friends calling me to get a custom shape pen.. I have caught myself watching how people write and how they hold a pen. When I am making stock I try to replicate those shapes. It works for me, but that is just me.
 

mark james

IAP Collection, Curator
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
7,969
Location
Medina, Ohio
Mike, those are excellent! The comments from Hank and Brian are well stated. The kit you choose has some specific challenges and you did well. The profiles are great and the finished pens are ones to be proud of.

I look forward to seeing more as you get sucked deeper into the vortex!
 
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