Multi-Sanding Discs Storage

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PreacherJon

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Aug 28, 2019
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339
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Ohio
Since I've been using Friction Polish as my main finish on bowls lately. (equal parts of BLO/DNA/Shellac). I have found that the higher the grit you go, the better the finish. Which is not true for all finishes.

So, if this helps you out... here is a tip on my organization of keeping all my sanding discs organized. These were $3.00 each at Harbor Freight. With my wife's label maker with both sides labeled... poof, there you got it.
 

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monophoto

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Mar 13, 2010
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Saratoga Springs, NY
Sandpaper storage is a frustration - Preacherjon has a solution, but it requires three boxes to hold his full range of grits. I don't think that would work for me since I like to keep my sandpaper on a small rack that sits on the floor next to my lathe, and three boxes wouldn't fit on the rack without the risk of falling off.

Instead, I use a box (also from Harbor Freight) that has seven full size compartments, and a couple of smaller compartments at the ends. I stock 100, 150, 220, 320, 400, 600, 800 and 1200 discs. The compartments are large enough to accommodate 2 3/8" discs from front to back, but not from side to side, so the discs have to sit on edge.

The ideal box for me would have eight compartments each 2 1/2" square so discs could sit flat. I haven't found it yet, but I'm still looking!

Conventional wisdom is to never skip grits, but there was an article in Woodturning Design about 10 years ago that was sort of an 'everything you wanted to know about sandpaper but were afraid to ask'. The author of that article repeated the 'don't skip a grit' mantra, but then noted it was arbitrary and that the key point was not not skip so many grits that it became difficult to remove the scratches from the earlier grits. Instead, he suggested not advancing by more than 150% in grit rating in a single step.

By the way, when I first started turning about 10 years ago, I bought one of the 'Turner's Bargain Boxes' from Klingspor. These are large boxes that contain a selection of grits typically used by turners - the abrasives are all cloth-backed rolls and are remnants left over from the process of packaging abrasive rolls for industrial use. Mine include both very heavy (stiff) abrasives as well as some very flexible cloth-backed stuff, and included 180, 220, 240, 320, 500, and 800 grit material - note that with the exception of the 240, this sequence also essentially follows the 150% step rule. That box contained a lot of abrasive, and I've only used about half of it - it truly was a great bargain!
 

sorcerertd

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Joined
Sep 30, 2019
Messages
931
Location
North Carolina, USA
The Klingspoor's box is a great bargain, especially if you catch them on sale for $10.
That's a great idea for the disc storage. I'm guessing those are the 2" ones for the bowl sander with the handle?
As for the regular sheets, I use an accordian style sorting case found with the school supplies.
 

PreacherJon

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Joined
Aug 28, 2019
Messages
339
Location
Ohio
I will concur, one box that size would be ideal.

But when I'm cutting well and the wood is behaving, I don't need that first box of sanding discs. I can start at the higher end.
 
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