Maple Mug

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Cwalker935

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I thought a coffee mug would be easy after making teapots, but not really. The smaller size presented some challenges.

4EB98934-BBC3-4CA0-8D25-78AE27A05532.jpg
 
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leehljp

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I'll take one filled with columbian to go! :biggrin: Nice looking!

Why was smaller more difficult? More tedious? I enjoy your wood pots and now your wood cups/mugs.
 

mark james

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Another wonderful turning Cody. Excellent in all respects. The shape and profile is very attractive, as is the wood grain.

Kudos.
 

Cwalker935

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I'll take one filled with columbian to go! :biggrin: Nice looking!

Why was smaller more difficult? More tedious? I enjoy your wood pots and now your wood cups/mugs.
To do these, I turn on two axes and I turn four separate faces. That involves turning between centers on one axes and using a 4 jaw Chuck on the other axes. If you are not careful you can either turn off your between centers mounting points or your recess for the 4 jaw chuck before you are ready to change axes. A smaller piece leaves you with less working room to maintain the various mounting points.
 

Cwalker935

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How do you turn that without knocking the handle off each time it comes around? :confused::confused:
I turn it on two separate axes. One axes for shaping the lower portion and for hollowing. The second axes for shaping the upper portion, stopping the cut on either side of the handle.
 

greenacres2

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Northwest IN
How do you turn that without knocking the handle off each time it comes around? :confused::confused:
I turn it on two separate axes. One axes for shaping the lower portion and for hollowing. The second axes for shaping the upper portion, stopping the cut on either side of the handle.
I read what you wrote, and all the words are easy enough for me to understand one at a time--i'm just having trouble with putting them together!!

Great mug!!
earl
 

SteveG

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Dec 21, 2009
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Eugene, Oregon 97404
Thanks for making a complex process clear, Cody. Now I can visualize the turning process. I can understand the need for careful planning, as you will shift the turning axis about 90* to work the portion where the handle will reside. Very cool process, and clearly not easy. That is what makes it fun, and yields such a nice result. Thanks for the explanation.
 

Charlie_W

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Nov 16, 2011
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Sterling, VA USA
Awesome turning Cody!! Shape, design and execution are spot on.

I’m still scratching my head a bit.....glad you have it figured out!
 
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