Manu Propria Pens - Sake Cups

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manupropria

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Nov 2, 2014
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Over the weekend I finished a "kawarinuri" experimental urushi lacquer project in which eggshells have been converted into small sake cups with stand.
The eggshells have been coated with urushi and iron powder, some 30 times to build a solid layer. After grinding and polishing the inside and outside was impreigned with transparent urushi "fuki-urushi"

Wish you all a great week.

Martin
 

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thewishman

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To take natural things and transform them into cups so nearly uniform must take a lot of time, practice and talent. Just imagining the delicate touch needed to put the first few coats on the eggshells, and then the polishing...

They are beautiful! How much thicker are the shells when they are completed?
 

Rachgard

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So incredibly delicate and beautiful. This is really impressive and belies a great deal of skill and practice. I would be very interested to watch a video of your process or maybe see a detailed description on how this was done.
Amazing! So glad you shared!
 

Gregory Hardy

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These are simply breathtaking. I am awestruck by the process, the materials in marriage, and the final product. I always ask myself before I go to sleep at night, "Did I leave something beautiful in the world so it's a better place?" (I mean, of course, "...in case I die tonight." Always hedge your bets with your Creator.)

I hope the first toast with the sake is to the man who made this art. Congratulations.
 

manupropria

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Thanks for your kind comments.

The process of making is applying a thin layer of transparent urushi lacquer which is sprinkled with finest iron powder.Then hardened 24 hours. This process is repeated around 20 times. The iron coat is then double as thick as the eggshell itself. Finally there is much grinding and polishing work to be done. The eggs are then cut with a fine saw. Inside and outside are rubbed with transparent urushi lacquer and removed fully then being hardened for 24hours. This process is also repeated several times until the surfaces are sealed. I am now working on projects with goos eggs and Ostrich eggs.

Cheers,

Martin
 

Marcros

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Sep 1, 2017
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United Kingdom
Thanks for your kind comments.

The process of making is applying a thin layer of transparent urushi lacquer which is sprinkled with finest iron powder.Then hardened 24 hours. This process is repeated around 20 times. The iron coat is then double as thick as the eggshell itself. Finally there is much grinding and polishing work to be done. The eggs are then cut with a fine saw. Inside and outside are rubbed with transparent urushi lacquer and removed fully then being hardened for 24hours. This process is also repeated several times until the surfaces are sealed. I am now working on projects with goos eggs and Ostrich eggs.

Cheers,

Martin
are the eggs painted whole first and then cut?

what do you use for grinding the coated shells? are they as fragile/delicate as they appear?
 

manupropria

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I cut them with a small cutting wheel after polishing and then ground the edges on a grinding machine. The urushi Iron coat is quite durable but the cup is still fragile. If dropped, it will fall in pieces like porcelain
 
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