Laser Cut Art Deco Design on a JR George

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Ken Wines

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Feb 7, 2013
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Before the Mid Ohio Valley Pen Turners Gathering this year I made 6 sets of these blanks to sell at the event. I decided to keep one. I've made several designs in the past never having the opportunity to make a pen from them, this time was going to be different. To date I've only made 10 sets of these blanks in the last couple years.

A little bit about the blanks. The woods are Walnut, Osage and Padauk. There are 92 inlays in the lower blank and the 22 small triangles have to be inserted using tweezers (at least I have to.) Although the triangles look equal in size and shape, the red ones and yellow ones have different radii on the edge opposite the sharp angle. The are 20 inlays in the upper blank.

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Lucky2

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Mar 2, 2012
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Now that's above and beyond the capabilities of this pen turner, and I don't ever imagine that I'll be able to assemble a blank like this one. What an amazingly gorgeous pen, an absolutely amazing blank, and a perfect kit to match it up with. Is it a keeper, or will you be putting it up for sale?

Len
 
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Ken Wines

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Feb 7, 2013
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Charleston, WV
Amazing artistry Ken. I look forward to each of your designs - very inspirational.

Thanks for sharing.
Thanks, Mark! In the sake of full disclosure I can't really take any credit for the design. I have a premium membership on vecteezy.com which allows me to use most of the artwork on the site without having to attribute it back to the site. When I saw this particular design, my head almost immediately went into the 3d visualization mode trying to picture how a pen would look utilizing it. The original pen I made from the design was basically a grid of walnut and inlays of maple. When I revisited the design I decided to add another color to the mix and this was the results.
 

Ken Wines

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Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
265
Location
Charleston, WV
Ken, that is amazing work. Really looks great on a turned pen. Thanks for sharing your work with us lesser talented folks.
Thanks, turncrazy43! I'm not really any more talented than anyone else on the forum. Perhaps the difference, I being retired have more free time to explore what is possible and what is not. Believe me when I tell you, the what is not list is much longer than the what is. I try to stay open minded believing that all is possible until proven otherwise.
 

Ken Wines

Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
265
Location
Charleston, WV
Now that's above and beyond the capabilities of this pen turner, and I don't ever imagine that I'll be able to assemble a blank like this one. What an amazingly gorgeous pen, an absolutely amazing blank, and a perfect kit to match it up with. Is it a keeper, or will you be putting it up for sale?

Len
Thanks, Len! Don't be too quick to place limits on your capabilities. I have no doubt that most in this forum could assemble a blank such as this. As far as the destination of the pen, it will probably be gifted to my eye doctor when I make my annual visit in December. He knows I make pens and at the end of the visit I show him recent pens that I've made. To see the look on his face when he tries to hand it back and you tell him to just stick it in his pocket is worth more to me than selling it to a total stranger.
 

mark james

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Sep 6, 2012
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Medina, Ohio
Thanks, Mark! In the sake of full disclosure I can't really take any credit for the design. I have a premium membership on vecteezy.com which allows me to use most of the artwork on the site without having to attribute it back to the site. When I saw this particular design, my head almost immediately went into the 3d visualization mode trying to picture how a pen would look utilizing it. The original pen I made from the design was basically a grid of walnut and inlays of maple. When I revisited the design I decided to add another color to the mix and this was the results.

I have followed your journey as closely as I can (I don't venture into other forums too often anymore), but I understand your comments. I look frequently at stained glass window designs for inspiration, and those especially formented by Frank Lloyd Wright's concepts and his school's (Taliesin).

When I was a music student (trumpet) I was told: "Here are some works by Mozart, and Haydn. Practice them 400-500-600 times (this month :eek: ) until you have mastered the skills needed to "get close."" By studying "the masters", we can gain skills and then move the designs forward a notch. As I have mentioned, I appreciate your designs. I do regard you as a "Master." You have different methods, (and bless you for sharing your results) - those are what I appreciate, and on occasion may try to emulate with the skills and tools I have.

Please, Carry on!
 
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