It would have been so pretty

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KenB259

Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
199
Location
Michigan
Looks like the blank cracked.

Did you perhaps turn this using excessive pressure on the ends of the blank, or assemble it with too much force ?

I've had similar problems with both !


I never even tried assembling it. I knew it was bad before applying ca. I just wanted to see what it would have looked like.


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mark james

IAP Collection, Curator
Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
8,097
Location
Medina, Ohio
What often appears to be a tight joint at 1" OD may not be so tight at the final OD of the pen (e.g .462"). It may have separated during drilling/turning, etc, but I suspect the joint was not perfect when glued-up. (Just speculating now, and I may be totally incorrect).

There is a slight "wave" with the chevron joint, and this also may indicate not a perfect match for the sections.

I have a plastic tub with 40-50 "if only except..." blanks.

And yes, what you assembled looks mighty nice.
 

KenB259

Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
199
Location
Michigan
What often appears to be a tight joint at 1" OD may not be so tight at the final OD of the pen (e.g .462"). It may have separated during drilling/turning, etc, but I suspect the joint was not perfect when glued-up. (Just speculating now, and I may be totally incorrect).



There is a slight "wave" with the chevron joint, and this also may indicate not a perfect match for the sections.



I have a plastic tub with 40-50 "if only except..." blanks.



And yes, what you assembled looks mighty nice.


You’re probably correct about the joint not being perfect. I guess you can never really tell until it’s done. But when I think about it, penmaking would probably get to be boring if absolutely everything turned out perfectly every time.


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leehljp

Member Liaison
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
Messages
6,729
Location
Tunica, MS,
I agree with Mark on this. And to me, it is in the jig. I spent more time working on a jig and correcting it than on pen blanks. As Mark mentioned - "a wave" - that and an imperfect jig. It takes practice and learning from mistakes - WHY they occurred . . if they can be found out - that is what leads to the perfect jig or perfect setting on the saw that gets the job done.

I had a friend when I was a young adult that taught me that angles are not just degrees but minutes and seconds. When I learned that such precision existed, I was both fascinated and floored! Then I learned to sneak up on those precision angles and that comes from experience and trial and effort.

This is not a loss at all. It helps to show what to watch for in the next one. One of the hardest things for me to accept was one perfect pen that I made the first time trying, and then could not duplicate it in the next 6 or 7 times! :rolleyes::redface:
 
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