HELP with Sharpening Skew Chisel

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penicillin

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Feb 27, 2019
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I am still trying to live with a Grizzly wet grinder and Tormek jigs. (I would rather have a slow speed grinder, CBN wheels, and a decent jig like the Wolverine or one of its imitations or competitors.) The problem is that they cost a lot of money, and I am not ready to give up on the Grizzly and Tormek jigs quite yet. My problems are:

-> Setup time with with the Tormek jigs and their TTS-100 setting tool to get the bevel perfectly matched with the grinding wheel. I want to do quick touch-ups. I do not want to spend gobs of time setting up for the quick touch-up. I especially want to avoid an hours-long regrinding of the bevels, which can easily happen.

... and ...

-> Consistency setting up the skew chisel in the SVS-50 multi-jig. This is where I am asking for help from you.

I have an ordinary standard "rectangular" skew chisel that I use. The SVS-50 jig clamps the sides of the chisel with two V-shaped clamps, which touch the corners, not the flats. One of the V-shape clamps tightens the skew against the other V-shaped clamp using a screw.

-> My problem is that the skew chisel clamp is not consistent. The skew chisel may have a slight, imperceptible rotational "twist" from the previous time. The result is that I find myself grinding a new bevel from left to right or right to left. On both sides, of course. ... because the skew chisel registration in the jig is not consistent.

How do others avoid this issue? It takes hours to grind a new bevel on a wet grinder. All I want is quick touch-ups to continue turning.

I would appreciate your help with how to make the Grizzly and Tormek equipment that I already own function for me.
 
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howsitwork

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Can’t advise on the jig use but I just use a diamond hone , 300 micron , you can ride it along the bevel easily as the bevel is hollow, ground from your wheel. So until you hone out that hollow grind the stone merely bridges across it allowing you to touch up the edge with ease. If you colour the bevel with black marker pen you can see you just sharpen the edge and rear bit of the tool

Easier to d9 than describe I’m afraid, sorry for that !
 

monophoto

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I don't use a Tormek, so the terminology you use is not familiar.. But a more significant difference is that I rarely grind my skew chisels. Instead, I hone them using a diamond plate or diamond paddle.

I break skew sharpening into three disciplines:
Discipline 1: grinding - something that I do only if the skew is badly out of shape. I use a high-speed grinder, but using a slow speed or Tormek would be the same.
Discipline 2: wet honing - this involves a diamond plate wetted with lapping solution. I place the skew bevel-down on the plate and rock it until I know that the bevel is flat against the plate, and then move it back an forth for a few strokes. It only takes a few seconds, but the set-up time (getting out the plate, wetting it, etc) takes longer than the time spent actually honing the edge. So I might do this before starting a project that I know is going to involve a lot of skew work.
Discipline 3: dry honing and is done with a small diamond paddle. I place the butt of the skew handle on the bedways with the blade pointing up, and wide the edge a few times with the diamond paddle. This takes only a few seconds and might be done several times during a project to tune-up the edge.
 

jttheclockman

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There are a ton of utube videos out there but here is a video that shows exactly what I do. I have learned this from from various turners. I do not use those wheels and have the white wheels. I can do this pretty quickly now and it is just all you need I like the platform method. If just need a quick touch up I break out the diamond pad and a couple swipes with that and good to go. Just be careful to keep same angle when using. Have a few of those tool gadget jigs because when I first got into turning I knew nothing and they were all the rage and found out they are just a expensive dust collector. That is a lesson for many beginners to not get caught up in all the hype and ads for tools that you probably never use. This applies to many woodworking forms.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...0B3685D9B75786B1AC390B3&view=detail&FORM=VIRE
 
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leehljp

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PURE WISDOM:
Have a few of those tool gadget jigs because when I first got into turning I knew nothing and they were all the rage and found out they are just a expensive dust collector. That is a lesson for many beginners to not get caught up in all the hype and ads for tools that you probably never use. This applies to many woodworking forms.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...0B3685D9B75786B1AC390B3&view=detail&FORM=VIRE
So many times I want to warn new turners of the catalogs. Catalogs and Stores are meant to create sales, and their tools are not necessarily the best benefit for the new turner. Same thing for other woodworking and other hobbies. I know the mindset of the newbie: "The catalog people know more than these old yahoos here." And, "There are a number of ways to do something, this is the way I do it."
While this last one is true, there are often easier, more consistent and more productive ways to accomplish things - if one is open to new ideas. But a catalog is usually the first teacher of what is needed - for many people. That is part of the cost of learning to make pens! 😏

There are a couple of old adages that apply:
• Most people will continue to believe the first thing they learn/ believe about something even when confronted with evidence to the contrary. (and advice from the experienced)
• How one starts out determines how they end up.

TO the OP: the one advantage I had even in trying different grinder types - was basic experience as in kid working in a farm shop. I knew how to grind drill bits on the grinder (but one needs to keep at it to maintain the edge - pun intended 🙂). My experience and buying three different kind of grinders for lathe chisels taught me that not all grinders do well in all situations. I now use a normal grinder as I grew up with in a shop, but do use CBN wheels. I don't have the time for slow grinding two dozen+ different kinds of chisels. The CBN wheels accomplish it rather fast, but I do end up doing what others mentioned - honing each one.

My experience taught me how to align and hand grind when needed, but I do use the alignment tools for most tools, but not all.
 

penicillin

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I appreciate all the help and video suggestions. I watched all the videos. I am very aware that I don't have the best equipment, and hope that others learn from my mistakes. I am trying to make it work with reasonable efficiency without quitting or giving up (at least not yet). The solutions or videos above that use Wolverine-type jigs or slow speed dry grinders or CBN wheels may help others avoid my mistakes, but it doesn't help me much to work with what I have now.

Trying to keep the thread on topic:

I was hoping to see more suggestions on how to make the SVS-50 yield easy, fast, and consistent positioning so that I can do touch-ups. This is the kind of help I am asking for in this thread.

I have also considered giving up on the SVS-50 and trying the flat platform, which would avoid the rotational positioning consistency issues with the SVS-50 and my standard (rectangular) skew. That may be the next thing to try if I can't get the SVS-50 jig to work out.
 

jttheclockman

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As I said I have the Tormak grinder but have shelved it because it is too slow and a hassle to set up. I have many of the jigs that go on that sliding bar and have not used them except the one for chisels and planner blades. I find the platform does a great and quick job. I said I have the white wheels and when I grind all I look for is a small spark off them and I know I am grinding. I mark the tool as in video and it is a great way to know if you are touching the tool to the wheel correctly. I just turn by hand to see the mark erase. Good luck in your venture. The skew is the most useful turning tool.
 
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