Help identifying this kit

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rbyeab

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Dec 28, 2011
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Seattle
Need help identifying this partial kit. I stopped doing pens years ago and now want to get back into it. I have many of these upper tubes and clips, but no transmissions (cross) lower tubes, nor can I identify which of all the junk I have are the correct bushings. (I like making my own center bands). This obviously looks like a cigar kit, but the tube takes an "o" bit. The brass portion of the tube is 1 and 3/16 and is slightly flared on the end.

So problem one- what is it, so I can identify the bushing, etc and problem two where can I get ala cart transmissions, lower tubes and nibs?

Thanks for your help
 

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ed4copies

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It will cost more for the parts than it will to buy complete kits. You have less than a quarter of the parts needed.
 

magpens

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@rbyeab

As Ed said . . . the parts required to complete your component set, IF AVAILABLE SEPARATELY, will cost you more than a complete kit.

The parts you show are for a ( Artisan ) Cigar Pen Kit . . . Craft Supplies USA sells those kits.

The parts you show are the top cap (finial), the clip, and an internal tube with coupler that screws into the cap that you show.

What you now need to complete the kit are the two pieces of brass tubing that constitute the primary structure of the pen, plus the nib end (pointed) and the center band. . There may be an additional coupler that mates the nib to one of the brass tubes. . The brass tubes required are classified as "10 mm" diameter because the drill size used to drill the blanks is a 10 mm drill bit. . I do not know the actual lengths of tubes.
Also required is a "twist action" mechanism to extend and retract the Parker-style refill ( also required ).

In addition, some other parts may be required (see the complete diagram linked below)

The tube that you show in your picture does NOT get glued into a blank. . Its purpose is to slide snugly over the twist mechanism which attaches to the lower "10 mm" tube's top end. . The tube you show has an attached coupler that screws into the cap that you show.

When replacing the refill, the top half of the pen pulls or twists off, thus exposing the twist mechanism which can be unscrewed to then expose the refill to be replaced.

A complete diagram showing ALL parts required can be viewed (and printed) here :


This PDF document also shows the exact sizes of the bushings required.

You can buy the complete kit at that source, or you can buy from other vendors as well, including ..... www . ExoticBlanks . com
or ..... www . penblanks . ca .....


Be aware that this particular component set that you show could be from any number of vendors. . This general style of kit has been around for many years and has been copied several times and remarketed with slight variations in the kit name. . There could be slight variations in the dimensions depending on the vendor who marketed.

If you want to cut your own brass tubes, you can buy 10-inch lengths of the "10 mm" brass tubes and cut your own according to the dimensions given in the last link I gave above. . . This design of pen is quite common and is quite forgiving to small variations in the brass tube lengths ( within reasonable tolerances ).

Good luck, and have fun !!!
 

Bats

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If you want to cut your own brass tubes, you can buy 10-inch lengths of the "10 mm" brass tubes and cut your own according to the dimensions given in the last link I gave above. . .
One caveat on this: If you buy "10mm" tubes from a pen supplier, you're probably fine - they know that "10mm" != 10mm. but if you go shopping elsewhere, you'll need to match the OD (which is actually a little under 10mm, although there's probably a little flexibility here) as well as precisely matching either the wall thickness or ID (which is probably a hair over whatever the small diameter on the bushings is), or else your components won't fit into it properly. But I'm with Ed & Mal - with this many components missing (and the difficulty of sourcing individual parts for just about anything other than slimlines), it's likely best to just buy a new kit and save these for spares.
 

rbyeab

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Location
Seattle
Thanks for the great advice guys. I took a closer look based on what you said and finally realized I bought these just for the clips and caps, to make a "kitless" 7 mm cigar pen. I really like how it turned out. It is Tzalam.
 

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magpens

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One caveat on this: If you buy "10mm" tubes from a pen supplier, you're probably fine - they know that "10mm" != 10mm. but if you go shopping elsewhere, you'll need to match the OD (which is actually a little under 10mm, although there's probably a little flexibility here) as well as precisely matching either the wall thickness or ID (which is probably a hair over whatever the small diameter on the bushings is), or else your components won't fit into it properly. But I'm with Ed & Mal - with this many components missing (and the difficulty of sourcing individual parts for just about anything other than slimlines), it's likely best to just buy a new kit and save these for spares.

@Bats . . . you make a good point. . But I was indeed thinking of the purchase being made at a pen parts supplier, eg. PennStateIndustries , as here listed :-

 

Bats

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@Bats . . . you make a good point. . But I was indeed thinking of the purchase being made at a pen parts supplier, eg. PennStateIndustries , as here listed :-
I figured that was what you had in mind - and that you were probably well aware of the issues involved, too. I just thought it might be worth clarifying for the sake of anyone else looking to cut their own tubes, so they wouldn't make the same sort of mistake I did when I was looking for cheaper sources of 7mm tubes at one point.

(because if there's one thing I'm good at, it's being a bad example)
 

magpens

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I figured that was what you had in mind - and that you were probably well aware of the issues involved, too. I just thought it might be worth clarifying for the sake of anyone else looking to cut their own tubes, so they wouldn't make the same sort of mistake I did when I was looking for cheaper sources of 7mm tubes at one point.

Yes, indeed.

On the same subject, the "10 mm" tubes (or whatever diameter) must be bought at a pen-parts supplier.
Such tubes are, as we know, undersize. . And they have the right wall thickness.

Do NOT buy "10 mm" tubes (or whatever) from a hobby shop . . . . such tubes ( eg. K&S brand ) are "actual size" ( or damned close )
and those will not be a good fit for a pen kit.

Of course, there are exceptions when you KNOW what you are doing, especially if you are making "full custom" pens to your own specs.
 
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